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Question: how to control how WHS is using disk space ? RRS feed

  • Question

  • 1st question

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    I installed WHS on a system with 160 (internal) HD and 1 TB external HD storage and added the external drives as server storage. Unfortunately, after I copied a lot of files to the shared folders WHS reported: 'disk full' - although there still was about 800 GB or more free space (on the external drives). I found out that all shared folders (which I created after the external 1 TB drive was added as server storage) were created by WHS only on the small local drive.

     

    How can I tell WHS to create the shared folders on the external storage device(s) where enough space is available ? Possible that the external drive usage is limited by/to the size of the local drive ???

     

    2nd question

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    After installing WHS I found out that only a very small amount of disk space had been reserved for WHS itself (on the local drive - about 5 GB). Because programs which are installed are saved (by default) on this 'system' partition (program files folder): how can I control (or change) the amount of disk space reserved for the 'system' partition (because I'm thinking about upgrading to a larger HD) ? (Even when I direct installations to another drive,. always a number of files from the installations will automatically be stored on 'system' drive c:, e.g. in windows or 'common files' etc)

     

    Thanks.

    Klaus

     

     

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 4:57 PM

Answers

  • #1:


    From the sounds of it, you didn't add your external drive to the disk pool.

     

    Windows Home Server will automatically use and distribute content amongst drives that you've added to the disk pool, something that only happens when you install WHS, or from the Home Server Console's Server Storage tab.

     

    Be warned though that any drive you add to the disk pool will be taken over and anything that was there will be lost.

     

    Take a look in the console to see if the external drive not only shows up, but also part of the pool.

     

    #2

    The final version of Windows Home Server reserves 20 gigs for itself, this amount is set by the installer and cannot be changed by users.

     

    Ideally you shouldn't be installing much software to your WHS and what you do, should be nice and small add-ins. If you do need to go beyond what is available there, it is recommended that you install to one of the shares, or directly to the D drive, to a directory there that you create that is NOT in D:\Shares (or its subfolders).

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 5:07 PM
    Moderator
  • Klaus,

     

    You cannot control how WHS utilises the disk space. The 20Gb primary partion on your C: drive is also fixed, (there is a way round it, BUT, it is NOT recommended or supported by Microsoft.)

    The space issue is the reason that all the documentation recommends that your System Disk should be your largest available disk. One reason being that any remaining space on the D: partion is what is used during the transfer of data from your clients to the server.

    The consensus earlier in the testing, seemed to settle on a system drive of 300-400Gb being about the appropriate size.

    The reason there is such a small C: drive, is because Microsoft don't expect any other programs, apart from possibly things like Anti-Virus/Disk Defagmentation etc., to be installed. Don't forget, this is not a desktop system, it is a headless server.

     

    If you are thinking of upgrading, I would suggest you do it now and use a larger drive as your system disk.

     

    HTH,

     

    Colin

     

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 5:11 PM

All replies

  • #1:


    From the sounds of it, you didn't add your external drive to the disk pool.

     

    Windows Home Server will automatically use and distribute content amongst drives that you've added to the disk pool, something that only happens when you install WHS, or from the Home Server Console's Server Storage tab.

     

    Be warned though that any drive you add to the disk pool will be taken over and anything that was there will be lost.

     

    Take a look in the console to see if the external drive not only shows up, but also part of the pool.

     

    #2

    The final version of Windows Home Server reserves 20 gigs for itself, this amount is set by the installer and cannot be changed by users.

     

    Ideally you shouldn't be installing much software to your WHS and what you do, should be nice and small add-ins. If you do need to go beyond what is available there, it is recommended that you install to one of the shares, or directly to the D drive, to a directory there that you create that is NOT in D:\Shares (or its subfolders).

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 5:07 PM
    Moderator
  • Klaus,

     

    You cannot control how WHS utilises the disk space. The 20Gb primary partion on your C: drive is also fixed, (there is a way round it, BUT, it is NOT recommended or supported by Microsoft.)

    The space issue is the reason that all the documentation recommends that your System Disk should be your largest available disk. One reason being that any remaining space on the D: partion is what is used during the transfer of data from your clients to the server.

    The consensus earlier in the testing, seemed to settle on a system drive of 300-400Gb being about the appropriate size.

    The reason there is such a small C: drive, is because Microsoft don't expect any other programs, apart from possibly things like Anti-Virus/Disk Defagmentation etc., to be installed. Don't forget, this is not a desktop system, it is a headless server.

     

    If you are thinking of upgrading, I would suggest you do it now and use a larger drive as your system disk.

     

    HTH,

     

    Colin

     

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 5:11 PM
  • From the sounds of it, you didn't add your external drive to the disk pool

    I did !

     

    As I assumed (see next answer below) it seems to be recommended by Microsoft that the first drive is the largest. Obviously, my configuration - small first drive, large 2nd drive - will not work as expected. WHS's file management does not really support such an environment !?

     

    Question #2: ok, thanks !

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 5:45 PM
  • The reason there is such a small C: drive, is because Microsoft don't expect any other programs, apart from possibly things like Anti-Virus/Disk Defagmentation etc., to be installed. Don't forget, this is not a desktop system, it is a headless server

     

    Mmmh - ok, this is a SERVER - but on a server I also want to - for example - :

     

    - run my SQL Server Databases or

    - run (scheduled) programs which download data from external locations and process this data

     

    To do this it is provided that I install:

     

    - Microsoft SQL Server

    - SQL Server Supporting programs (Recovery, Management ...)

    - Microsoft Office (Access, evtl Excel)

    - Converters (from / to pdf etc etc)

    - a text and a html editor

     

    plus

     

    - AntiVirus

    - Some system utilities

     

    So - a 20 GB system partition is VERY small !!! Too small !!

     

    Best regards,

    Klaus

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 6:00 PM
  • Don't forget this product is marketed at the technically unsophisticated HOME market by means of Hardware Vendors. I can't see HP installing SQL Server etc for that market.

    The minority of technical users who are interested in that sort of thing will know how to manipulate the restrictions to suit their own requirements.

     

    Colin

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 6:06 PM
  • Klaus

     

    yes, its a server, but you have to remember its a HOME server :-)

     

    your average home user is not going to want to run SQL Server and other such applications - they are just going to want to have WHS share their files and backup their computers.

     

    Andrew

     

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 6:08 PM
    Moderator
  • Hello -

    your average home user is not going to want to run SQL Server and other such applications

    I strongly disagree !
    I think many HOME users are using their computer much more sophisticated than the average business user (who only does some text processing and calculation).

    As a (typical) home user I am:

    - collecting and processing content for my political work
    - maintain databases for several hobbies
    - which both require full text research
    - maintain my photo and multimedia databases (10th of thousands of files which are to be catalogized ...)
    - maintaining all the data & studies etc in out local home network for my wife (a teacher) and my 3 children (high school / students ) etc etc

    Up to now I used my PC with WinXP prof SP2 as a file server substitute (with many contraints , e.g. performance, often unclear broken network connections).

    Now -I don't want to use a toy or a demo software - and Microsoft told me that the Home Server is based on Windows Server 2003 (as the starting screen of HomeServer tells me): a typical platform for all the things I want do to ! 'Home' is a name for a limited number of users: 10 ! OK, I'm also missing some features (which offer other very cheap NAS servers, e.g. 'user goups'), but I was waiting for WHS because it is not only a file storage system (like NAS) but a computer on which I can run programs (unattended !!) .

    No problem, I'm also willing to use the 'full' product of Windows Server - if (!) Microsoft would be willing to offer an intuitive user interface where all important features are concentrated. But I'm not willing to focus on the maintenance of the - from my view - non-intuitive and very deep und (from my sight) unstructured and distributed function tree of the full Windows Server product.

    The user from which you are speaking is the typical user of a network NAS device - simple interface, usable only for storage functions - and cheap: for the price of WHS software you also get the complete hardware.




    Thursday, October 25, 2007 10:03 PM
  • Klaus

     

    I think you might be missing the point of Windows Home Server. It is designed to be a simple to use product that basically does what it says on the tin, sits quietly in the corner somewhere so that your "average" home user can use the functionality that comes with it.


    I dont know that many average home users who want to run SQL for example - Im not saything that people dont want to do that, just that I dont know many! If Microsoft thought that would be what a lot of home users would want Im sure it would have featured somewhere in the product :-)

     

    What you want is not currently what WHS actually offers.


    Also, I think you are also missing some of WHS features - its not just storage, its streaming, its backup, its restore, it remote access and more. That is a lot more than just a simple NAS device can offer.

     

    Yes, it is based on Windows 2003 - but it is a "cut down" version of Windows 2003, not the full blown product with WHS added to it.

     

    If you want a system that can do what you describe, I dont think WHS is it (today) - I think you should consider something like SBS or even 2003 because it is more extensible - but obviously WHS is a lot cheaper than either of those 2 and has different features.

     

    Andrew

     

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 10:18 PM
    Moderator