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Can anybody recommend off the shelf hardware to run Windows Home Sever RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm wanting to setup a Windows Home Server primarily to store digital photos and music. I'm finding it hard to buy an off the shelf solution. HP seem to be about to drop or have dropped their MediaSmart models. I cannot find any current models on the Acer website though they clearly used to make them. That seems to leave TranquilPC. Am I missing something here?

    Any advice welcome.

    Thursday, December 30, 2010 9:30 PM

Answers

  • If you want a turnkey solution, and you live in USA, I recommend you look for an HP solution. If you do your research, you can find units at most popular online sites such as HP, Amazon, NewEgg and Tiger Direct to name just a few.

    Inventories are spotty right now, so be advised. Keep in mind that HP models are "headless" which means you cannot attach a monitor to them. You have to administer them remotely. That is easy (and that is how the system was designed.)

    The HP models have many extras to make use easier and more reliable. There is also a rich community of people who use them and can be helpful to you.

    On the other hand, building a WHS is very easy for nearly anybody. Sourcing the hardware is simple. You must purchase an O.E.M. copy of the Windows Home Server software (about $100) from a company such as NewEgg when you order the hardware. The beauty of WHS is that it is designed to run on a wide variety of hardware.

    If you want any further information, please post here, where others can provide you with additional advice, or let me know and I will be happy to help.

     


    Will
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 10:14 PM

All replies

  • If you want a turnkey solution, and you live in USA, I recommend you look for an HP solution. If you do your research, you can find units at most popular online sites such as HP, Amazon, NewEgg and Tiger Direct to name just a few.

    Inventories are spotty right now, so be advised. Keep in mind that HP models are "headless" which means you cannot attach a monitor to them. You have to administer them remotely. That is easy (and that is how the system was designed.)

    The HP models have many extras to make use easier and more reliable. There is also a rich community of people who use them and can be helpful to you.

    On the other hand, building a WHS is very easy for nearly anybody. Sourcing the hardware is simple. You must purchase an O.E.M. copy of the Windows Home Server software (about $100) from a company such as NewEgg when you order the hardware. The beauty of WHS is that it is designed to run on a wide variety of hardware.

    If you want any further information, please post here, where others can provide you with additional advice, or let me know and I will be happy to help.

     


    Will
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 10:14 PM
  • I live in England but some of the HP models are still available. What I don't understand is why HP and Acer seem to have pulled out of selling these systems. I would prefer to buy a main stream system from a supply who is continuing in the market but cannot find one - or I'm missing something completely. The headless option isn't a problem.

     

    Thanks

     

    Richard

    Friday, December 31, 2010 10:29 AM
  • You have a great source of news and information regarding the status and future of WHS at the UK site:

    http://www.wegotserved.com

    The current version of WHS is, well, exceptionally great by most accounts. In my opinion, it will be a viable option for needs such as yours for years to come. Its successor, Code Name "Vail," presumably will do nearly everything the old version does and more. But the controversy about Vail centers on high probability that the shipping product will not contain WHS v1's awesome Drive Extender feature.

    Nearly any computer will run WHS fine. Just be sure you get one that has a 64-bit processor, in case you want to upgrade to the next version of WHS.

     

     


    Will
    Friday, December 31, 2010 7:27 PM
  • Hi Richard

    I'm a WHS newbie and just set it up on an HP Microserver (a little over £200 but there's a £100 cashback offer on so cheap and cheerful).

    There's a very helpful thread on wegotserved. I followed the advice on a quick BIOS change and which network driver to use, installed, clicked in a pair of 500gb drives I had spare from another project, and it's just fine.

    http://forum.wegotserved.com/index.php/topic/16427-whs-on-hp-proliant-microserver/

    Hope that helps.

    Neil

     

    Saturday, January 1, 2011 2:56 PM
  • Hello

     

    Accidentaly i was looking at the HP Microserver too. 

    I had the "pleasure" to install it recently for a client using Windows Server 2008 R2 Foundation, initially it was a pain to get the built in SATA/RAID controller (if we can call it a raid controller) working. The Foundation being built i presume on the same core (Windows Server 2008 R2), i'm not too worried about the installation itself - in this particular case i ended up streamlining the AMD SATA drivers to the installation source.

    I really like the design of this box, it would fit exactly in to the cabinet i have my RC version running right now on a Dell pc (Core 2 Duo 2GHz), but one thing i'm concerned is the CPU - Dual Core 1.3 GHz AMD Athlon II.

    For a very similar amount of money, i could get a HP Proliant ML 110 G6 with 2 core Xeon CPUs (and it comes with a DVD drive, keyboard and mouse).

    My home network consists of 5 PCs/Laptops, and at same time 2-3 would be using the server. Is this CPU sufficient for the streaming of the files (SD movies mostly, no HD)?

     

    Thanx 

    Monday, February 28, 2011 6:29 PM