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Windows 7 doesn't detect my iAudio X5 RRS feed

  • Question

  • My XP laptop recognizes my iAudio X5, but not my Dell Inspiron desktop with Home Premium Windows 7, 64 bit.  When I plug it into a USB port (and I have tried all 6 USB ports on my computer, front and back), a Windows "Device Connect" sound occurs, and when I unplug it, the Windows "Device Disconnect" sounds occurs.  But no mp3 player window opens up, and when I look for it in Windows Explorer, it's not there.  When I go to Device Manager and look under Universal Serial Bus Controllers, iAudio X5 is listed there. I contacted the manufacturer, Cowon, and the Win7 machine they connected to an iAudio X5 was able to recognize it with no difficulty.  My firmware is up to date as is my Windows Update. I checked Windows 7 Compatibility, and it indicated that the iAudio X5 is compatible. I've checked all my additional drives with no luck.
    Saturday, December 25, 2010 5:21 AM

Answers

  • Windows drivers come in 32 bit and 64 bit versions. I know most of the media software is 32 bit and would have to have a 32 bit driver but most device manufactures also make a 64 bit driver. I was wondering if your installation software asked you which version to install and if you choose the 64 bit driver and not the 32 bit driver. If you did this, it would show up in the device manager but would not open the mp3 player when you plugged the device up( if the mp3 player is 32 bit).

     Windows scans the ports and when something is plugged in it checks to see if there is a driver installed for the device and if there is a driver then windows opens the correct application, such as the mp3 player. Now if you only had a 64 bit driver and you did not have any 64 bit software for the driver then windows would do nothing.

     I just started using a 64 bit dual processor machune and have been studing it a little. I had to install some device drivers and was asked on one of them which driver 32 bit or 64 bit to install. On my USB to serial adapter I had choosen the 64 bit thinking it was the right one for my machine. I found out it needed the 32 bit driver because all the software was 32 bit for the adapter.

     One way to check to see if you have a 32 bit driver installed for the device is open the control panel and go to the device manager, select properties for your   iAudio X5 device and the click on the driver tab and then click driver details in the small window is listed the drivers and their locations mine shows something like this for a 32 bit driver "C:/Windows/System32/Drivers/????.sys" My 64 bit machine is down right now and I can not check to see what a 64 bit would look like on it but i would assume it would have system64/Drivers/????.sys. 

     Another thing you can try. In the control panel select default programs. Then select the MP3 player that you use from the list that will be displayed. There is two selections at the bottom of the window one is Select this program as default, make sure it is set as default. Then there is Choose defaults for this program, click this and a list of file types that this software can open will be shown. Make sure all the file types are checked that your device can use. This is what windows uses to know which application to open when that file type is being used. This can cause windows not to start the MP3 player.

     The last thing that I know of that could cause the problem is the register does not have the correct data in it to tell windows what parrameters to use when starting and which application to start. I stay away from this area and when I have problems that lead to this I either get help or do a complete reinstall of my system. When the registery is messed up, usually the only way to correct it is to reinstall the system or do a restore to a point early in the system setup.

    Curtis

     


    Always Lost in Code, Always mark answers as correct if they answer you question and solve your problem. This way others when searching for similar problems can find the answer faster.
    Sunday, December 26, 2010 6:30 AM

All replies

  • Linthel,

     Is your XP a 64 bit machine too? Also are you sure it is windows 7 premium and not windows 7 Ultimate kn or n because this sounds like the multimedia software is not installed or not in stalled correctly? Windows 7 Ultimate kn & n does not have the multimedia installed you have to install it seperate.

     If your Xp is a 32 bit machine then this may be just you need to install it using the 32 bit mode. The 64 bit and 32 bit devices are run in seperate modes and if the drivers are installed for 64 bit and not 32 then the 32 bit software would not be called. So there is many things that could cause your problem.

    Curtis


    Always Lost in Code, Always mark answers as correct if they answer you question and solve your problem. This way others when searching for similar problems can find the answer faster.
    Saturday, December 25, 2010 6:50 PM
  • The XP is 32 bit. My Windows7 is definitely Home Premium. I had already installed the multimedia software which works normally.  I don't know what you mean by "install it using the 32 bit mode"?  I never had to do anything other than plug the iAudio X5 into the XP laptop USB port in order to start using it. I didn't have to actively or manually install any drivers.
    Sunday, December 26, 2010 5:00 AM
  • Windows drivers come in 32 bit and 64 bit versions. I know most of the media software is 32 bit and would have to have a 32 bit driver but most device manufactures also make a 64 bit driver. I was wondering if your installation software asked you which version to install and if you choose the 64 bit driver and not the 32 bit driver. If you did this, it would show up in the device manager but would not open the mp3 player when you plugged the device up( if the mp3 player is 32 bit).

     Windows scans the ports and when something is plugged in it checks to see if there is a driver installed for the device and if there is a driver then windows opens the correct application, such as the mp3 player. Now if you only had a 64 bit driver and you did not have any 64 bit software for the driver then windows would do nothing.

     I just started using a 64 bit dual processor machune and have been studing it a little. I had to install some device drivers and was asked on one of them which driver 32 bit or 64 bit to install. On my USB to serial adapter I had choosen the 64 bit thinking it was the right one for my machine. I found out it needed the 32 bit driver because all the software was 32 bit for the adapter.

     One way to check to see if you have a 32 bit driver installed for the device is open the control panel and go to the device manager, select properties for your   iAudio X5 device and the click on the driver tab and then click driver details in the small window is listed the drivers and their locations mine shows something like this for a 32 bit driver "C:/Windows/System32/Drivers/????.sys" My 64 bit machine is down right now and I can not check to see what a 64 bit would look like on it but i would assume it would have system64/Drivers/????.sys. 

     Another thing you can try. In the control panel select default programs. Then select the MP3 player that you use from the list that will be displayed. There is two selections at the bottom of the window one is Select this program as default, make sure it is set as default. Then there is Choose defaults for this program, click this and a list of file types that this software can open will be shown. Make sure all the file types are checked that your device can use. This is what windows uses to know which application to open when that file type is being used. This can cause windows not to start the MP3 player.

     The last thing that I know of that could cause the problem is the register does not have the correct data in it to tell windows what parrameters to use when starting and which application to start. I stay away from this area and when I have problems that lead to this I either get help or do a complete reinstall of my system. When the registery is messed up, usually the only way to correct it is to reinstall the system or do a restore to a point early in the system setup.

    Curtis

     


    Always Lost in Code, Always mark answers as correct if they answer you question and solve your problem. This way others when searching for similar problems can find the answer faster.
    Sunday, December 26, 2010 6:30 AM
  • Following the suggestion you made in your 4th paragraph above, I checked the Properties of my Audio X5 under USB controllers in Device Manager, and lo and behold, it said, "no driver installed"!  I chose "Search automatically for updated driver software," but Windows said that a driver was already installed. So I tried "Browse my computer for driver software," then "Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer." The only choice listed was "USB mass storage device." So I picked that, and Windows proceeded to install it.  A window immediately popped up for my mp3 player, and the player was then completely accessible! I wonder whether the whole problem as well as the reason for Windows installing a USB mass storage device driver wasn't because my mp3 player happens to have a hard disc drive rather than the more usual flash drive. Who knows?

    The main thing though is that it worked. Thanks for your excellent assistance!

    Tom Lindow

    Monday, December 27, 2010 12:14 AM
  • I think I learn more in your post......
    Tuesday, December 28, 2010 1:52 PM