locked
XP and Office: Disk and COA, both with holograms. OEM versions. Will they pass WGA? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Many versions of XP and Office 2003 now being sold include original Mcrosoft CD media and COAs.  But they are labeled OEM.
    The impression I'm getting from posts on this board is that an original CD and COA are no guarantee of passing WGA if the software is labeled OEM.
    Is that right?
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 7:26 PM

Answers

  • Hello bnad,

    As long as an OEM licensing kit is truly a Genuine item, personally I don't think there is any reason whatsoever to even dream that one day Microsoft will decide to use WGA to "flag" Genuine systembuilder/OEM licenses installed by individuals and computer enthusiasts on their personal machines.  Mainly because they have no reason to do it, and also because there would be no way of looking into the installation and knowing if it were installed according to the somewhat arcane licensing rules.  When you do an online validation now, there is a disclaimer at the bottom of the screen that says something like, Even though this installation of [product] passed validation, that does not mean it is properly licensed.

    I have been participating in this forum for over three years, and in that time I have only seen a handful of cases where there was an issue with a Genuine OEM licensing kit, and the WGA result shows as "Blocked PID."  I posted this  a while back in another thread:

    "If you search this forum you will see that your result, "blocked PID," is quite rare.

    Based on what has been posted in those older threads with Blocked PID, my suggestion would be to contact the Microsoft licensing specialist with Ingram Micro and discuss the matter with them.  Previous Blocked PID situations seem to involve a mix up in communication between Microsoft and the distributor, in this case Ingram Micro, regarding the distributor erroneously reporting back to Microsoft that this particular Product Key was classified as a "return."

    In at least one of the threads, it took several months for the situation to be addressed."

    From attending may TS2 and partner events, I can tell you that Microsoft is well-aware that a lot of systembuilder/OEM licensing kits are purchased by end users.  Even though the rules governing who can buy the licensing kits were "tightened up" about 2-3years ago, the rules are routinely ignored by sellers.  MS des not seem to mind because I think they know that someone buying a systembuilder licensing kit is likely to be an advanced user who will not need any Microsoft hand-holding to install or troubleshoot their installations, so the sale does not cost them money in terms of extra tech support expenditures, and in the overall sales picture, OEM licensing sold to end users is a small percentage of the business.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, September 15, 2009 9:24 PM
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 1:42 PM
  • Hello Bnad,

    Both retail and OEM licensed Microsoft products can be counterfeited, and counterfeits generally are caught either during the activation process or during validation by either WGA/OGA or by online validation at http://www.microsoft.com/genuine.

    Microsoft's current implementation of the WGA and OGA program offer a complimentary replacement for preinstalled installations of Office and Windows that are later found to be counterfeit.  Please read about the Genuine Windows Offer here http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FAQ.aspx?displaylang=en&sGuid=b5892d7a-d7cb-426a-b7ae-185716367476#ID0EFIAC  and the Genuine Office Offer here  http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FAQ.aspx?displaylang=en&sGuid=b5892d7a-d7cb-426a-b7ae-185716367476#ID0EKNAC

    You can look at some pretty convincing counterfeit software materials here http://www.microsoft.com/howtotell/content.aspx?displaylang=en&pg=counterfeit
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 9:57 PM

All replies

  • Hello Bnad,

    Both retail and OEM licensed Microsoft products can be counterfeited, and counterfeits generally are caught either during the activation process or during validation by either WGA/OGA or by online validation at http://www.microsoft.com/genuine.

    Microsoft's current implementation of the WGA and OGA program offer a complimentary replacement for preinstalled installations of Office and Windows that are later found to be counterfeit.  Please read about the Genuine Windows Offer here http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FAQ.aspx?displaylang=en&sGuid=b5892d7a-d7cb-426a-b7ae-185716367476#ID0EFIAC  and the Genuine Office Offer here  http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FAQ.aspx?displaylang=en&sGuid=b5892d7a-d7cb-426a-b7ae-185716367476#ID0EKNAC

    You can look at some pretty convincing counterfeit software materials here http://www.microsoft.com/howtotell/content.aspx?displaylang=en&pg=counterfeit
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Saturday, September 12, 2009 9:57 PM
  • Thanks for the info.  It appears the XP CD I just bought (from China) is a high quality counterfeit.  But the XP CD I bought last year (also from China!) is genuine.

    Regarding OEM versions of XP: it seems that almost all versions of XP now commercially available are OEM versions, even those from reputable vendors such as CompUSA and Amazon.com.  Because they're being sold by reputable vendors, I'm assuming the media and COAs for these versions are genuine and not counterfeit.  If that is the case, and these OEM versions of XP sold by Amazon and CompUSA are used for build-your-own-PC use, is there a danger that they may not pass WGA?
    I guess what I'm asking is: will Microsoft use WGA to turn on a "counterfeit" notification on these OEM versions sold by CompUSA and Amazon if Microsoft detects or suspects that they are being used for home PC self-builds?  I doubt that these versions are being sold to the Dells and HPs of the world, so it seems to me that there could be a whole class of non-counterfeit XP packages, sold by reputable vendors, being bought for $100 or more by people who have every reason to think their software should be allowed to work, except for the OEM designation.
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 3:29 AM
  • Hello bnad,

    As long as an OEM licensing kit is truly a Genuine item, personally I don't think there is any reason whatsoever to even dream that one day Microsoft will decide to use WGA to "flag" Genuine systembuilder/OEM licenses installed by individuals and computer enthusiasts on their personal machines.  Mainly because they have no reason to do it, and also because there would be no way of looking into the installation and knowing if it were installed according to the somewhat arcane licensing rules.  When you do an online validation now, there is a disclaimer at the bottom of the screen that says something like, Even though this installation of [product] passed validation, that does not mean it is properly licensed.

    I have been participating in this forum for over three years, and in that time I have only seen a handful of cases where there was an issue with a Genuine OEM licensing kit, and the WGA result shows as "Blocked PID."  I posted this  a while back in another thread:

    "If you search this forum you will see that your result, "blocked PID," is quite rare.

    Based on what has been posted in those older threads with Blocked PID, my suggestion would be to contact the Microsoft licensing specialist with Ingram Micro and discuss the matter with them.  Previous Blocked PID situations seem to involve a mix up in communication between Microsoft and the distributor, in this case Ingram Micro, regarding the distributor erroneously reporting back to Microsoft that this particular Product Key was classified as a "return."

    In at least one of the threads, it took several months for the situation to be addressed."

    From attending may TS2 and partner events, I can tell you that Microsoft is well-aware that a lot of systembuilder/OEM licensing kits are purchased by end users.  Even though the rules governing who can buy the licensing kits were "tightened up" about 2-3years ago, the rules are routinely ignored by sellers.  MS des not seem to mind because I think they know that someone buying a systembuilder licensing kit is likely to be an advanced user who will not need any Microsoft hand-holding to install or troubleshoot their installations, so the sale does not cost them money in terms of extra tech support expenditures, and in the overall sales picture, OEM licensing sold to end users is a small percentage of the business.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, September 15, 2009 9:24 PM
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 1:42 PM