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  • Question

  • I'm rebuilding my WHS system with two SATA drives. One 1TB and one 320GB. Which one should I load the system onto? I plan on enabling duplication on the shared folders.

    Thanks, Ken

    Wednesday, April 29, 2009 2:37 PM

Answers

  • The 320 GB drive will be fine.

    Before you install Windows Home Server I would recommend you check the BIOS for your computer to see if you can set your SATA ports to IDE or legacy mode. This will normally allow Windows Home Server to install successfully with in-box drivers. If you can't do this for some reason, you will probably have to supply drivers for your SATA drives to be seen by Windows Home Server setup. In this case, because your system drive will need drivers to be seen, you will need to supply drivers twice, and they will need to be supplied on a floppy disk. The first time will be in the initial graphical portion of setup, at the hardware detection screen. The second time is just after the first reboot, at the "Press F6" prompt that will appear at the bottom of the screen.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by kensweather Wednesday, April 29, 2009 6:48 PM
    Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:14 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The 320 GB drive will be fine.

    Before you install Windows Home Server I would recommend you check the BIOS for your computer to see if you can set your SATA ports to IDE or legacy mode. This will normally allow Windows Home Server to install successfully with in-box drivers. If you can't do this for some reason, you will probably have to supply drivers for your SATA drives to be seen by Windows Home Server setup. In this case, because your system drive will need drivers to be seen, you will need to supply drivers twice, and they will need to be supplied on a floppy disk. The first time will be in the initial graphical portion of setup, at the hardware detection screen. The second time is just after the first reboot, at the "Press F6" prompt that will appear at the bottom of the screen.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by kensweather Wednesday, April 29, 2009 6:48 PM
    Wednesday, April 29, 2009 4:14 PM
    Moderator
  • When it is an advantage to use a larger size drive as the primary drive.  I have been using a 500GB drive since the beta and I have been considering doing a clean install to simply clean things up from playing around a little and I was considering using a newer 1TB drive.  Why do some sources such as "home server show" and even HP mention larger drives. 

    My current setup is

    500GB
    250GB
    250GB
    200GB
    160GB

    Friday, May 1, 2009 12:26 PM
  • A lot of the WHS "net wisdom " is from the pre-PP1 period. At one time, the system drive (specifically the D: partition) was used by Windows Home Server as a "landing zone" for files being copied to the server. they would be written first to D:, then would be moved to the secondary drives in the storage pool. One result of this was that the largest file (or group of files) you could copy to your server in a single operation was limited by the free space on D:. At that time, it was very desirable to use the largest possible drive as the system drive. When Power pack 1 was released that changed; Windows Home Server now writes files directly to the storage pool when they're copied/moved to the server.

    If I were building a server from scratch today, I would buy a 500 GB drive and two 1 or 1.5 TB drives (whatever gives the best price per GB at the e-tailer I buy from). I would use the 500 GB drive as the system drive, and the larger drives as secondary drives in the storage pool.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, May 1, 2009 3:15 PM
    Moderator
  • Well then what is the purpose of using the minimum size hard drive.  Is that to allow space for the client backups.  Why would you not use a small drive like 40GB for the system drive and add the larger drives after that.
    Friday, May 1, 2009 10:40 PM
  • Well then what is the purpose of using the minimum size hard drive.  Is that to allow space for the client backups.  Why would you not use a small drive like 40GB for the system drive and add the larger drives after that.

    Because WHS won't install on a hard drive that's less than 70 GB.
    Saturday, May 2, 2009 4:07 AM
    Moderator
  • My point is what is the purpose of using any more than the minimum, whatever that happens to be regarding that version, for your OS drive.  I am referring to that one drive.  I think of it as a way to recycle an older and of course smaller capacity drive.
    Saturday, May 2, 2009 12:20 PM
  • Large drives offer more room for data, and are newer. More room for data is good because, well, you have more room for data. :) Newer is good because hard drives are mechanical, and mechanical devices will wear out over time. A three year old drive is probably close to the end of it's life, and is an extremely poor candidate for the system drive in a computer that will be turned on 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, May 2, 2009 2:56 PM
    Moderator