locked
Two Different Windows XP Home installations on same computer won't validate RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a Dell that came with Windows XP home edition on it but got a virus and windows wouldn't boot on it.  I didn't have the original installation CD that came with the computer so I installed one that I did have and it has a valid COA on it.  The thing is, I didn't format the hard drive.  I installed the second windows XP in a second windows directory so both versions of windows XP are on there.  I thought that the validator would read my COA from my second installation of windows but it's not.  It's picking up the OEM version's COA and saying my current windows XP does not match the COA it is reading.  How do I get the validator to read the COA from the second installation?
    Sunday, August 3, 2008 4:15 AM

Answers

  • I fixed it.  I wound up getting another copy of Windows XP from my college that allows us one free.  So, I reinstalled that over the second installation of windows and left the original windows intact.  Fired it up and it let me activate!  Thank goodness I'm a college student and have access to the academic software microsoft gives out free.  What a pain to have 2 perfectly good versions of windows and unable to use them because i already used them on other computers that i no longer have.  I miss w*a*r*e*z.  Piracy was survival!
    • Edited by Living Sacred Monday, August 4, 2008 6:22 AM misspelled a word
    • Marked as answer by Living Sacred Friday, August 8, 2008 5:13 AM
    Monday, August 4, 2008 6:21 AM

All replies

  • I fixed it.  I wound up getting another copy of Windows XP from my college that allows us one free.  So, I reinstalled that over the second installation of windows and left the original windows intact.  Fired it up and it let me activate!  Thank goodness I'm a college student and have access to the academic software microsoft gives out free.  What a pain to have 2 perfectly good versions of windows and unable to use them because i already used them on other computers that i no longer have.  I miss w*a*r*e*z.  Piracy was survival!
    • Edited by Living Sacred Monday, August 4, 2008 6:22 AM misspelled a word
    • Marked as answer by Living Sacred Friday, August 8, 2008 5:13 AM
    Monday, August 4, 2008 6:21 AM
  • Living Sacred,

    If the two "perfectly good" copies of Windows are OEM licenses from other computers, then they are no longer "perfectly good" for any use EXCEPT as installed on the computers they originally came with.

    Piracy is theft.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Monday, August 4, 2008 3:19 PM
  • Living Sacred,


        I would like to share some valuable information with you regarding using NON-GENUINE software.  There are various versions of non-genuine Windows in the wild people are using.  Further research indicates there were @ a minimum of 10 viruses imbedded with non-genuine releases.  Next product key code generators are also embedded with virsus and maleware. This will put your computer in a Non-Genuine status immediately. Product key code generators ARE NOT authorized! 
    Microsoft product keys are only allowed to be used on one computer unless otherwise specified in the end user licensing agreement (EULA). You can research EULA information @ Microsoft. 

        Under NO circumstances should anyone try to download/distribute any ISO images for software from a P2P file sharing site, or use a second-hand burned copies of software. Research has shown that about half of the software copies available on P2P download sites are infected with root kits, spyware, Trojans, and honestly who knows what else. At this point there could be a great chance your computer could be taken over by a malicious user. You may want to research purchasing a good software suite that protects against maleware and antivirus etc. Microsoft Live OneCare has a great product for taking care of customers systems.

        There are other options available also such as purchasing software directly from Microsoft @ http://www.windowsmarketplace.com/ and installing it directly onto a newly purchased computer. Please always research the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) for all the correct usage agreements. Next review http://www.howtotell.com should any questions and/or doubts arise. Also you may always visit the WGA Forum and ask us. 


    Take care,


    Stephen Holm, MS


    Stephen Holm
    • Edited by Stephen Holm Monday, August 4, 2008 5:10 PM Updated
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Wednesday, August 6, 2008 11:39 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by Living Sacred Thursday, August 7, 2008 6:52 AM
    Monday, August 4, 2008 5:07 PM
  • Corporate shills, all of you.  Microsoft owns you.  How very sad.
    • Marked as answer by Living Sacred Thursday, August 7, 2008 6:52 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by Living Sacred Friday, August 8, 2008 5:13 AM
    Thursday, August 7, 2008 6:52 AM
  • Do you realize what you are saying?  Or have you been brainwashed by your years of working for Microsoft?

    You are saying that I cannot use MY copy of Windows XP on any other computer than the one I bought it for.

    That makes as much sense as telling me that if I move to a new house that I can't bring my furniture.  The furniture I bought was only good for the old house.  I have to go out and buy all new furniture for my new house.  That makes no sense.  Unless, of course, you are the furniture store...
    Friday, August 8, 2008 5:12 AM
  • Living Sacred said:


    You are saying that I cannot use MY copy of Windows XP on any other computer than the one I bought it for.


    It is NOT YOUR COPY.  Microsoft software is licensed, never sold.  Licenses are an agreement between the owner of the software and the licensee, you.  You agree to the terms when you buy, install, and use the software.

    OEM licenses, which your other computers might have had (or not, we do not know for sure from the available info), by the terms of the licensing agreement, are NOT permitted to be moved from one computer to the other.

    Retail licenses ARE permitted to be moved form one computer to another.

    A much better analogy than the erroneous furniture analogy is the driver's license analogy.  You have a DL from your State---does that mean you own the road?  No, your State is allowing you to use the road as long as you follow the rules set by the State, the rules you agreed to follow when you signed your DL.
    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, August 12, 2008 4:01 PM
  • Ah, but my driver's license is valid in all 50 states.  Although one police officer in my state tried to give me a ticket for not having a license from this state although my car was registered here but I was only a student, a temporary resident, so I didn't need to change my driver's license.  But, typical authoritarian, totalitarian attitude could not comprehend that.  No thinking outside the box.  No making exceptions, even though state law provides that exception.  No sense of what is reasonable or good for the public at all.  Kind of like Microsoft...
    Tuesday, August 12, 2008 10:51 PM