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8 Year Old OEM Suddenly Not Valid RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've had the same OEM copy of windows xp home for about 6-7 years.  I've reformated my computer at least a dozen times and been able to validate and update windows with no problems whatsoever.  Over the years, I've pretty much upgraded every part in the system apart from the motherboard and processor.  I do remember being asked to re-validate a couple of times after replacing parts but again, there was never a problem.

    I recently purchased a new system so I sold my old computer to a student friend of mine.  I swapped the original windows install drive with one of the other larger drives I had in the machine and reformated everything.  I gave my friend all of my original disks and the product key sticker is still the same it's always been.  I am not using the old product key on my new computer as it came with its own sticker and a new OEM copy of Windows.  I've never installed or used my software/key on any other machine.

    He installed Windows Xp using the same disk and key on the same computer that I've been using for years and was able to activate with no problem.  However, when he went to get updates (as the copy with the machine is rather old) he could not validate.  I told him that it was possible that he'd just have to activate by telephone as I had reinstalled windows a lot over the years and there may be a limit on how often you can do it online.  He phoned the support number and gave every number listed on the product key sticker and was told he had a valid product but it was listed as being reported stolen or a fraud.  He was told his only recourse was to purchase a new copy of windows.

    As the original user of the product, I never reported it stolen.  I've researched possible causes for an invalid product and non seem to apply here.  I've never brought the machine to anyone for repairs.  I've had the same key and machine for years without problem.  The only change is I swapped the original 40gb install drive with the 200gb drive I had been using as storage.

    I'm not really sure what to do here.  All the research I've been doing on the problem all seems to lead to dishonest repair shops or crooked salesmen.  I haven't come across anything that can tell me about a product that was valid for years suddenly becoming invalid.

    Wednesday, January 28, 2009 8:50 PM

Answers

  • Hello Kduch,

    The OEM System Builder you originally purchased was tied to the actual motherboard onto which it was originally installed. Upgrading the motherboard would require a new licensing key to be purchased. Below is a more detailed description.

     

    OEM (System builder/COA): OEM license for XP comes with certain restrictions that make it less flexible, and therefore less expensive, than the retail license for Vista.  A major limitation is that the license is "married" to the computer onto which it is first installed, and the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) states it is not permitted to be moved to any another computer.  One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availability is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized. To read your EULA, click Start>Run, type winver and click OK, then click on the link for the license terms or EULA.

    Does this help clairfy some? 

     

    Thank you,

     

    Stephen


    Stephen Holm
    • Proposed as answer by Stephen Holm Wednesday, January 28, 2009 9:33 PM
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Wednesday, February 4, 2009 10:37 PM
    Wednesday, January 28, 2009 9:31 PM

All replies

  • Hello Kduch,

    The OEM System Builder you originally purchased was tied to the actual motherboard onto which it was originally installed. Upgrading the motherboard would require a new licensing key to be purchased. Below is a more detailed description.

     

    OEM (System builder/COA): OEM license for XP comes with certain restrictions that make it less flexible, and therefore less expensive, than the retail license for Vista.  A major limitation is that the license is "married" to the computer onto which it is first installed, and the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) states it is not permitted to be moved to any another computer.  One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availability is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized. To read your EULA, click Start>Run, type winver and click OK, then click on the link for the license terms or EULA.

    Does this help clairfy some? 

     

    Thank you,

     

    Stephen


    Stephen Holm
    • Proposed as answer by Stephen Holm Wednesday, January 28, 2009 9:33 PM
    • Marked as answer by Stephen Holm Wednesday, February 4, 2009 10:37 PM
    Wednesday, January 28, 2009 9:31 PM
  • The motherboard and processor (and probably half the ram) are pretty much the only original parts in the machine.  I've asked my friend to run the diagnostic tool so hopefully I'll have those results soon and I can post all the info asked for in the sticky.
    Thursday, January 29, 2009 12:12 AM