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changing motherboards RRS feed

  • Question

  • hi all

    will it be a problem to change motherboards from 1 brand to another ?

    i hope not i will set up my sata drives and ide all the same as in master slave config

    or 1 & 2

    has anyone had any dramas doing this ?

    cheers scott

    Tuesday, October 23, 2007 11:33 AM

Answers

  • Windows Home Server (like other OEM software from Microsoft) is "locked" to a particular hardware configuration on activation, and can't be moved to a different configuration. You're allowed some changes, but you would have to replace major parts that have failed with the same part, or with the part that the manufacturer recommends as a replacement. So if your Asus (for example) motherboard fails, you would have to either get a new one of the same model, or if it's no longer available, you'd have to get the motherboard that Asus recommends as the replacement for yours. You wouldn't be able to go out and replace it with a Gigabyte motherboard.
    Tuesday, October 23, 2007 11:51 AM
    Moderator
  •  

    Neither.

     

    WHS is an OEM product, which means that once it is activated, it is locked to a specific machine.  Motherboards do fail, in which case an OEM (you in this case) needs to replace it with the same motherboard model (or manufacturer recommended replacement model).

     

    So, while WHS has lower hardware requirements, and you see a lot of people stating that they are running WHS on old PC they have sitting around, I don't recommend it for this very reason - it might be kind of difficult getting another of those old Piii boards.

     

    Remember OEM is different than Retail -  Retail has support from Microsoft, and the license can be transferred to a different machine - OEM does not have Microsoft support (you need to go thru the OEM - you if you bought OEM OS), and CAN NOT be transferred to a different machine (and a new mainboard would constitute a different machine).

     

    Mash  

    Tuesday, October 23, 2007 1:19 PM

All replies

  • Windows Home Server (like other OEM software from Microsoft) is "locked" to a particular hardware configuration on activation, and can't be moved to a different configuration. You're allowed some changes, but you would have to replace major parts that have failed with the same part, or with the part that the manufacturer recommends as a replacement. So if your Asus (for example) motherboard fails, you would have to either get a new one of the same model, or if it's no longer available, you'd have to get the motherboard that Asus recommends as the replacement for yours. You wouldn't be able to go out and replace it with a Gigabyte motherboard.
    Tuesday, October 23, 2007 11:51 AM
    Moderator
  • so can i do a reinstall or is it format all drives solution

    i have a gigabyte and i have a new mobo but it isnt a giga

    geez 1.2 terabytes is alot to back up if i need to format

    and then the problem is i have no monitor can i plug server into laptop and use laptops screen

    as the monitor using the laptop vga port

    or i do i need to find 1 just for this ? i hope i can do it over the network or laptop vga

    any ideas??

    cheers scott

    Tuesday, October 23, 2007 12:18 PM
  •  

    Neither.

     

    WHS is an OEM product, which means that once it is activated, it is locked to a specific machine.  Motherboards do fail, in which case an OEM (you in this case) needs to replace it with the same motherboard model (or manufacturer recommended replacement model).

     

    So, while WHS has lower hardware requirements, and you see a lot of people stating that they are running WHS on old PC they have sitting around, I don't recommend it for this very reason - it might be kind of difficult getting another of those old Piii boards.

     

    Remember OEM is different than Retail -  Retail has support from Microsoft, and the license can be transferred to a different machine - OEM does not have Microsoft support (you need to go thru the OEM - you if you bought OEM OS), and CAN NOT be transferred to a different machine (and a new mainboard would constitute a different machine).

     

    Mash  

    Tuesday, October 23, 2007 1:19 PM

  • I was actually pretty excited about Windows Home Server until this post.  I was aware of the OEM thing, but I thought you could call and transfer the OS. 


    I am having second thoughts now on spending ~$180 for something that is locked into a single motherboard.  I was planning on using an old system and I don't know how long it will last and if I can get another identical board.


    I am sorry to say that I am going to have to rethink my options here and probably not purchase WHS.


    Tuesday, October 23, 2007 7:02 PM
  •  

    Ditto,

    I'll have to decide to get it now or wait for v2, especially if paying $180.00 USD for WHS & not being able to upgrade the PC if the MB goes belly-up.

    Hopefully v2 won't be a OEM OS.

     

    Is WHS OEM worth $180.00, if your PC dies & you are stuck w/ a non-usable $180.00 OS... I think NOT...

     

    It actually appears that WHS was not ready for RTM anyway... Have you noticed the references to Server 2003 during the installation & in the help files?    What up w/ that?    A Rush JOB?

     

    It just doesn't seem like the OLD MS Quality is in this one.

    Tuesday, October 23, 2007 7:45 PM
  • In theroy, Ken is right about OEM versions of Window being locked to a specific harware config. However, in practice it may be possible to change the mobo. I have done exactly this with an OEM installation of XP MCE. My gigabyte mobo burned after a couple of years, so I replaced it with an Intel mobo. This did require a complete re-install of windows though.

     

    I was expecting activation to fail after the reinstall and was preparing myself for a pleading phone call to Microsoft. But, in fact automatic activation worked with no problems. Automatic updates and Windows validation work just fine too.

     

    I have heard that there is a timer associated with the lock of the OS to the hardware that times out six months after a hardware change. In other words, if your hardware hasn't changed significantly for more than six months, then you may be able to re-activate the OS on another hardware configuration. Provided, of course that you aren't running the same copy of the OS on more than one machine.  

     

    I have also read reports of people in your situation talking nicely to Microsoft Tech Support and being allowed to re-activate on different hardware.

     

    If you have any doubts, I would suggest calling Tech Support and explaining the situation.

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    Ben

    Wednesday, October 24, 2007 6:37 AM
  • I have changed the OEM installation from one hardware setup to a completely different setup by a new re-installation. The new installation wouldn't automatically re-register, so I had to telephone to do it. No problem whatsoever, and only took a couple of minutes.

    Don't forget that by far the vast majority of sales are going to be via the pre-packaged vendor route who will be taking care of hardware failures.

     

    Colin

    Wednesday, October 24, 2007 5:08 PM
  • I need to change MB with one that has 6 SATA ports so that I can add 2 more harddrives. I've ordered a new Intel board. The old MB is an Asrock with 2 SATA ports. My WHS is an OEM version. Is there anyway to do this?
    Monday, January 19, 2009 10:19 PM
  • Hi Gerry,
    no need to put in the same question into two (this being already answered) threads.

    Related to the OEM installation thing: I moved my hardware platform for WHS about 3 times to a new motherboard. Sometimes product activation kicked in, sometimes not, but I did not face any activation problems.

    Some points what to consider I mentioned in the other thread, to which you posted.

    Good luck
    Olaf
    Tuesday, January 20, 2009 7:36 AM
    Moderator