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Microsoft CHARGES to Activate Windows XP ? RRS feed

  • Question

  • My story:

    I am repairing an out-of-warranty HP Pavilion Desktop Computer. I changed the Motherboard and CPU. I reloaded Windows XP and called Microsoft to "Activate" Windows. After 2 separate calls and several hours on the telephone, they reluctantly gave me a new Product Key. However, when I entered the key, Windows said it was "Invalid". Yes, I double checked and triple checked the key with the Microsoft representative. I asked her to generate another key, but she refused. I asked for a case number so we could resolve the issue. I was told I would have to pay a Tech Support Fee in order to receive a case number.....The Windows software is working fine with the exception of the "You must Activate within 30 days" message. WHY SHOULD I HAVE TO PAY TO ACTIVATE MY LEGITIMATE LICENSE OF WINDOWS?

     

    Friday, August 24, 2007 9:40 PM

Answers

  • Hey genius, maybe YOU should read my previous posts. As I said earlier, HP no longer provides a replacement motherboard for that model.  Yes, I know my license is still valid. I just have to convince Microsoft. Yes, I used a systembuilder/OEM CD. It just happened to be provided by Dell. According to Dell, the CD they provided is a "SystemBuilder/OEM" CD and does not contain any "BIOS locks" or proprietary software. Thay said that CD can be used on any computer, as long as I "Legally Activate It". Yes, I did a Telephonic Activation.

    Yes, I thought about downloading an ISO, but came to my senses. I have sinced purchased another copy of XP from the Great Microsoft Monopoly. I have learned that it is not worth the effort to repair a broken computer. The entire computer industry has the deck stacked against you. This is my last post. Good luck to you all.

    Sunday, August 26, 2007 6:18 PM

All replies

  • Jim,

     

    Did you explain the situation about the failed components? Did replace the defective HP components with HP components? 

     

    We request all users initially run the Genuine Diagnostics tool to try and identify the issue you may be having.

    Download and run the utility at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 , then click the Windows tab, Copy to

    Clipboard, then paste the report into a New Post on this Forum.

     

    Step 2 is tell us about the COA. Tell us:


    1. What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center?
    2. Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?
    3. Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?
    4. DO NOT post the Product Key.
    5. Please also provide a short description of the issue you are experiencing.

     

    NOTE: The data collected with the Genuine Diagnostics Tool does NOT contain any information that can personally identify you and can be fully reviewed, by you, before being posted.

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    Friday, August 24, 2007 11:10 PM
  • Hi Stephen,

    Yes, I explained the situation to the MS rep.

    No, HP no longer makes replacement parts for this Desktop. I replaced them with genuine Intel components.

    Step2:

    1. Pro

    2. Neither.

    3. Hewlett Packard

    4. OK, I won't post the product key.

    5. After replacing the motherboad & CPU, the HP restore disks will no longer work as they do not recognize the system as a HP. I called HP for a copy of Windows that could be installed on the repaired system. They can only send Windows embedded in Restore disks. As stated before, this will not work. Since a Windows license was part of the original purchase, I assumed it would be legal to load Windows from a CD I received with a Dell system. Then, I asked Microsoft to update my original HP product key to work with the repaired system. When the product key they gave me didn't work, I was left out in the cold by Microsoft.

     

    Thanks for your help.

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.7.0039.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Not Activated
    Detailed Status: N/A
    Cached / Grace status: N/A, N/A
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-*****-*****-*****
    Windows Product Key Hash: 3g4CZGFEDgbKmn/oB4pa2FZsssU=
    Windows Product ID: 76487-OEM-2211906-00102
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    CSVLK Server: N/A
    CSVLK PID: N/A
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro
    ID: {CF64F928-AEA9-47D7-86F9-B1F8AF88E04A}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    Commit / Reboot / BRT: N/A, N/A, N/A
    WGA Version: Failed to retrieve file version. - 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: N/A
    Architecture: N/A
    Build lab: N/A
    TTS Error: N/A
    Validation Diagnostic: 025D1FF3-171-1_025D1FF3-179-2_025D1FF3-199-3
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: Failed to retrieve file version. - 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: FCEE394C-2993-80070002_B4D0AA8B-470-80070002

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{CF64F928-AEA9-47D7-86F9-B1F8AF88E04A}</UGUID><Version>1.7.0039.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-YD4YT</PKey><PID>76487-OEM-2211906-00102</PID><PIDType>2</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1409082233-73586283-725345543</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>INTEL_</Manufacturer><Model>D865GVHZ</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Intel Corp.</Manufacturer><Version>BF86510A.86A.0075.P24.0503071605</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="3"/><Date>20050307000000.000000+000</Date><SLPBIOS>Dell System,Dell Computer,Dell System,Dell System</SLPBIOS></BIOS><HWID>A84E32E70184805D</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/></MachineData>   <Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/></Office></Software></GenuineResults>

    Saturday, August 25, 2007 6:45 PM
  • I think you should take Microsoft to small claims court over this because they are infringing on your right of first sale to use a purchased commodity good (NOT a work for hire) for any purpose you see fit.
    Saturday, August 25, 2007 8:06 PM
  • JimMCF3000,

     

    There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter, retail (aka full packaged product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is NOT permitted to be moved to any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception, the case of a defective motherboard.  If a motheboard becomes defective, you are of course permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  For reasons stated below, if at all possible, you should replace it with and identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement.

    The details become sticky when the license was obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses SLP technology, which sets the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP.  The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine systembuilder/OEM MS XP CDROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  However, when installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and annot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CDs.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availablity is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased

    Saturday, August 25, 2007 9:10 PM
  • Ehh.....WHAT ???? From what I gather from the previous post it goes something like this:

     

    Upgrade a motherboard for performance reasons - you are screwed.

    Replace a defective motherboard with a different one (which is in my case)-Microsoft will force you to jump through so many hoops you will eventually become frustrated and go out and buy a new license (again...you are screwed).

     

    After reading the above post twice, I believe my licence should still be valid. HP refuses to send a OEM CD (that is not embedded in Restore disks). Dell should have the same OEM standing with Microsoft as HP does. Therefore, using the Dell OEM CD should be valid. Microsoft is so worried about piracy, they have failed miserably in doing what is best for their customers.

     

    Now if you will excuse me, I have to go out and that it up the *** and buy another license.

     

    Saturday, August 25, 2007 10:36 PM
  • Your issue is with HP and not Microsoft.  It was HP that customized their OEM version of Windows so that it is BIOS-locked to a specific HP motherboard BIOS.  If you replaced the HP motherboard with a non-HP motherboard, then there would, of course, by no HP BIOS.  So what I'm saying is if your HP motherboard died, then so did the HP OEM Windows license.

     

    Saturday, August 25, 2007 11:27 PM
    Moderator
  • JimMCF3000,

     

    Stop ranting and start reading.

     

    Your license is still valid.  You have to use a systembuilder/OEM CD because you chose to use a non-HP motherboard to replace a defective HP motherboard.  If you would have used an acceptable replacement HP mobo, you wouldn't have the current problem.

     

    Your expectation to be able to use a Dell CD on an HP is delusional.

     

    Use a systembuilder/OEM CD for the kind of XP you have (you wrote the CoA was for XP Pro) along with the PK on the HP CoA, then after installation do a Telephonic Activation.  It's likely you have a friend or relative who has one of these CDs.  If not, ask a local computer shop to burn you a copy for a few dollars.  Resist the temptation to just download an iso off the internet since these a rife with rootkits, viruses, and who knows what else.

    Sunday, August 26, 2007 2:01 AM
  • Hey genius, maybe YOU should read my previous posts. As I said earlier, HP no longer provides a replacement motherboard for that model.  Yes, I know my license is still valid. I just have to convince Microsoft. Yes, I used a systembuilder/OEM CD. It just happened to be provided by Dell. According to Dell, the CD they provided is a "SystemBuilder/OEM" CD and does not contain any "BIOS locks" or proprietary software. Thay said that CD can be used on any computer, as long as I "Legally Activate It". Yes, I did a Telephonic Activation.

    Yes, I thought about downloading an ISO, but came to my senses. I have sinced purchased another copy of XP from the Great Microsoft Monopoly. I have learned that it is not worth the effort to repair a broken computer. The entire computer industry has the deck stacked against you. This is my last post. Good luck to you all.

    Sunday, August 26, 2007 6:18 PM