locked
Concerns about the WGA program RRS feed

  • Question

  • According to the Q&A page that I've been reading, the following information is collected from my system when I agree to participate in the WGA program:

     

     

     

     

     

    Q:

    What information is collected from my computer?

     

    A:

    The genuine validation process will collect information about your system to determine if your Microsoft software is genuine. This process does not collect or send any information that can be used to identify you or contact you. The only information collected in the validation process is:

    • Windows product key
    • PC manufacturer
    • Operating System version
    • PID/SID
    • BIOS information (make, version, date)
    • BIOS MD5 Checksum
    • User locale (language setting for displaying Windows)
    • System locale (language version of the operating system)
    • Office product key (if validating Office)
    • Hard drive serial number

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    If the validation process is using information such as the BIOS information and MD5 Checksum (which can be upgraded on many systems), and the Hard Drive Serial number (which may fail and/or be upgraded as well), then am I to assume that if I upgrade any of these items I will no longer be able to validate my software?  I am a computer enthusiast that routinely upgrades many of the components on my systems (especially hard drives).  Will I need to buy another copy of Windows XP Professional every time I do an upgrade?  

    Wednesday, June 7, 2006 1:03 AM

Answers

  • Rich99,

    WGA and Product Activation work hand in hand toward the goal of enforcing the various End User Licensing Agreements and preventing casual copying, a common form of software "piracy."

    Product Activation is the mechanism that establishes an installation of XP on a given collection of hardware, and WGA is the mechanism that checks up on the installation to make sure all is well.  You could say that PA is the major Exam and WGA is the Pop Quiz. 

    Product Activation is more likely to keep track of the collection of hardware associated with a given Windows installation.  If that collection changes too much, you will be asked to reactivate the XP license.

    Have a read at this link for good info on PA and hardware changes:  http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.php

    Wednesday, June 7, 2006 1:24 AM

All replies

  • Nope!

     

    You will have to simply reactivate.

     

    -Phil Liu

    Wednesday, June 7, 2006 1:22 AM
  • Rich99,

    WGA and Product Activation work hand in hand toward the goal of enforcing the various End User Licensing Agreements and preventing casual copying, a common form of software "piracy."

    Product Activation is the mechanism that establishes an installation of XP on a given collection of hardware, and WGA is the mechanism that checks up on the installation to make sure all is well.  You could say that PA is the major Exam and WGA is the Pop Quiz. 

    Product Activation is more likely to keep track of the collection of hardware associated with a given Windows installation.  If that collection changes too much, you will be asked to reactivate the XP license.

    Have a read at this link for good info on PA and hardware changes:  http://www.aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.php

    Wednesday, June 7, 2006 1:24 AM