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Can WHS act as a ADSL Router? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have just sent back my D-Link draft-n router after much frustration and dissappointment with a long line of their products which got me thinking.....

     

    For the simple home user why have a router? Would it not be simpler and more economical to have DHCP, Firewall, Wireless Lan server ADSL Modem all on the server?

     

    This shoud save on power consumption becoming a greener solution as well.

     

    Being a "simple home user" could anyone explain if and how this can be acheived?

    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 2:21 PM

Answers

  • To be honest, if you're concerned about power consumption, you would be better off sticking with a router and switch. They'll use less power than your server.

    But as for using your server as a router, it's probably doable, but it's definitely unsupported. Microsoft has a vision for WHS, and being your "everything" isn't part of that vision.

    You'll need to install/configure two network cards (unsupported, and WHS doesn't support multi-homing, so you'll probably have some pain getting your connections bridged), and you'll need to install/configure a number of other services that are not normally used: RRAS and DHCP for sure, probably DNS as well, and I'm honestly not sure what all else. Smile All of this is somewhat complicated to configure correctly, and the correct configuration can vary widely depending on your ISP and your internal network setup.

    Other considerations: Do you really want your home server, which presumably is the repository for all your important data (like finances, medical records, etc.) on the very edge of your network, exposed to the Internet? I don't. And traffic with WHS directly will potentially interfere with your Internet connection. Is that something you want?
    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 3:54 PM
    Moderator
  • The security issue is a good point, as is the traffic one. I will stick with a router. Just have to wait for the Wifi consortium to sort their act out with approving draft n. For now it's just 54g.

     

    Thanks for the help.

     

    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 4:01 PM

All replies

  • Simple answer is no! There is a DHCP addon (http://forums.microsoft.com/WindowsHomeServer/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=2013024&SiteID=50) but the rest is complicated and / or not supported. Whilst 'not supported' doesn't mean it won't work it does mean you might break things and there would be no MS support if you did.

     

    Gordon

    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 2:59 PM
  • You would have thought in the age of reducing your carbon footprint this should be an option!

     

    Been doing a little research and I have got this far....

     

    • ADSL connection - Directly connect server to ADSL via a modem
    • Use Server 2003 firewall or some other software
    • Share the internet connection through windows
    • Add a wireless card which can act as an access point. I have this listed one of the modes on my wireless adapter.
    • Connect Computer/Laptop/XBOX etc to the servers wireless lan connection.

    Is it not this simple?

     

    (At work at present so will give it a go tonight)

    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 3:08 PM
  • To be honest, if you're concerned about power consumption, you would be better off sticking with a router and switch. They'll use less power than your server.

    But as for using your server as a router, it's probably doable, but it's definitely unsupported. Microsoft has a vision for WHS, and being your "everything" isn't part of that vision.

    You'll need to install/configure two network cards (unsupported, and WHS doesn't support multi-homing, so you'll probably have some pain getting your connections bridged), and you'll need to install/configure a number of other services that are not normally used: RRAS and DHCP for sure, probably DNS as well, and I'm honestly not sure what all else. Smile All of this is somewhat complicated to configure correctly, and the correct configuration can vary widely depending on your ISP and your internal network setup.

    Other considerations: Do you really want your home server, which presumably is the repository for all your important data (like finances, medical records, etc.) on the very edge of your network, exposed to the Internet? I don't. And traffic with WHS directly will potentially interfere with your Internet connection. Is that something you want?
    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 3:54 PM
    Moderator
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
    To be honest, if you're concerned about power consumption, you would be better off sticking with a router and switch. They'll use less power than your server.

    But as for using your server as a router, it's probably doable, but it's definitely unsupported. Microsoft has a vision for WHS, and being your "everything" isn't part of that vision.

    You'll need to install/configure two network cards (unsupported, and WHS doesn't support multi-homing, so you'll probably have some pain getting your connections bridged), and you'll need to install/configure a number of other services that are not normally used: RRAS and DHCP for sure, probably DNS as well, and I'm honestly not sure what all else. All of this is somewhat complicated to configure correctly, and the correct configuration can vary widely depending on your ISP and your internal network setup.

    Other considerations: Do you really want your home server, which presumably is the repository for all your important data (like finances, medical records, etc.) on the very edge of your network, exposed to the Internet? I don't. And traffic with WHS directly will potentially interfere with your Internet connection. Is that something you want?

     

     

    Like I said the short answer is no :-) Thanks for confirming my thoughts Ken.

     

     

    Gordon

    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 4:01 PM
  • The security issue is a good point, as is the traffic one. I will stick with a router. Just have to wait for the Wifi consortium to sort their act out with approving draft n. For now it's just 54g.

     

    Thanks for the help.

     

    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 4:01 PM
  •  GordonTGopher wrote:

     Ken Warren wrote:
    To be honest, if you're concerned about power consumption, you would be better off sticking with a router and switch. They'll use less power than your server.

    But as for using your server as a router, it's probably doable, but it's definitely unsupported. Microsoft has a vision for WHS, and being your "everything" isn't part of that vision.

    You'll need to install/configure two network cards (unsupported, and WHS doesn't support multi-homing, so you'll probably have some pain getting your connections bridged), and you'll need to install/configure a number of other services that are not normally used: RRAS and DHCP for sure, probably DNS as well, and I'm honestly not sure what all else. All of this is somewhat complicated to configure correctly, and the correct configuration can vary widely depending on your ISP and your internal network setup.

    Other considerations: Do you really want your home server, which presumably is the repository for all your important data (like finances, medical records, etc.) on the very edge of your network, exposed to the Internet? I don't. And traffic with WHS directly will potentially interfere with your Internet connection. Is that something you want?

     

     

    Like I said the short answer is no :-) Thanks for confirming my thoughts Ken.

     

     

    Gordon

     

    Isn't there router software available that will run on WHS??

    Monday, August 25, 2008 8:26 PM
  • Robin, everything you need is available in Windows Server 2003, so it's available in Windows Home Server. However, it requires a number of unsupported modifications to your server that have a good chance of causing problems, and it's definitely a violation of the EULA.

    A broadband router is much cheaper and runs no risk of breaking your server when you try to make it into something that Microsoft really doesn't want it to be.
    Monday, August 25, 2008 9:23 PM
    Moderator
  • I see Smile Well the idea of turning WHS into a software router left my mind a while ago but i needed a strong argument that would really make the idea going out of my mind. I'll just have to save some more for a good external router but that won't be a problemSmile Thanks for your reply/advice! 

    Monday, August 25, 2008 10:04 PM