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Why not offer both raid and/or duplication? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I just got back from fry's. I purchased 8tb of storage for slightly less then $400.00 (4x2tb@$89.99 each plus tax). These drives will give me about 4tb of RAID storage that can survive a concurrent failure of two drives. With 3tb and 4tb drives soon to be available the price of storage will soon drop again.

    If your budget does not permit new high capacity drives and/or you insist on using older smaller drives then duplication may be your best choice.

    If your interest is reliability then you should spend the few extra dollars and buy new drives. You can implement high reliability RAID strategy that will protect your data from drive failure. In addition, they will have a higher MTBF because they are new and there will be fewer of them.

    Given that the 3tb and 4tb drives will probably be in the market before VAIL is released - why not offer both alternatives?

    Sunday, October 31, 2010 12:10 PM

All replies

  • Because Windows Home Server is a consumer product, and RAID is not a consumer technology.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Sunday, October 31, 2010 1:19 PM
    Moderator
  • I'm running my copy of Vail Beta with the following configuration (not supported), as it seemed most efficient and gave me the option of using what I had (RAID included):

    • 320GBx2 Western Digital RE3 (raid edition drives) - pulled from storage pool, 60GB C:\ System, 238GB D:\ for VM Guests (VMWare Server, as Vail does not have HyperV) - RAID 1 on ARC
    • 2TBx2 Western Digitial EARS (green edition new advanced format, not raid friendly) - storage pool, all folders using duplication - Motherboard SATA
    • 1.5TBx1 Western Digital EARS (green edition new advanced format, not raid friendly, and different size than rest) - backup pool (only the critical folders set to be touched by backup) - Motherboard SATA
    • 2TBx6 Western Digital EADS (green edition, none advanced format, allows enabling of TLER) - pulled from storage pool, 7.4TB E:\ for media storage - RAID 6 on ARC

    I set it up this way, as I already had the EARS drives, and they are not RAID friendly with their error correction timings.  You have to be careful about, that, especially when you start talking more than 4 drives in an array.  The RAID was setup, as I wanted optimum performance on that volume, as well as dual drive failure coverage.  The raid card I've got Areca ARC-1222, provides ~110MB/sec writes with this configuration, around 30% faster than the DE managed volume with the same performance level disks (Yes, I have teamed NICs on a switch that supports 802.3ad) .  It's not hard to simply open explorer, create a share, and setup perms to the two users I've got on my home network.  The media volume is the only one that will ever grow past the ~1.5TB of usable space I've got in the DE volume as well, and this raid card supports RAID level/size migration.  The only bad part there, is you cannot upgrade say two drives at one time like you could with a DE volume.

    This is again fully unsupported, but I've been running like this for quite a while now, and have had no issues.  It works great, and with my system drive on RAID, my personal critical data on DE with Windows Backup as well as being nightly synchronized offside to S3 disk, my Media on a smoking fast RAID volume, support for multiple VMWare Guests, DHCP and DNS services turned on, and support for the few extras I use including Super Flexble File synchronizer (for backing up all my remote data to my WHS, as well as backing up my WHS to Amazon S3), and PS3 Media Server for streaming data to my home theater.  I am quite happy.  I also like the fact that this system is based on 2K8, so I can learn and use things that I don't get to do at work, and being 64bit, I was able to load it up with a Xeon 3430 Quad core and 8GB of memory for hosting more than one OS for my web development efforts as well!

    I really would have rather purchased 2k8 Standard for this machine, but shelling out over $1k for just the OS did not sit well with me.  It's too bad they don't give us power home users an option to purchase it at a more reasonable public sector rate.

    ** Note, it's a little strange, but the backup software in Vail insists that you backup the D:\ volume if you set it up like I did.  This must be due to the fact that it's part of the same physical volume as the System is using.  This has yet to cause problems, but I don't really need to backup the data on the D:\ drive.  I would open an issue on this, but it's pretty far outside the realm of supported configurations.

     

    Sunday, October 31, 2010 3:36 PM
  • "I really would have rather purchased 2k8 Standard for this machine, but shelling out over $1k for just the OS did not sit well with me.  It's too bad they don't give us power home users an option to purchase it at a more reasonable public sector rate."
     
    Maybe Aurora will meet your needs.
     
     

    Release notes can be found here:

     

     
    --
    _________________
     
    BullDawg
    In God We Trust
    _________________

    I'm running my copy of Vail Beta with the following configuration (not supported), as it seemed most efficient and gave me the option of using what I had (RAID included):

    • 320GBx2 Western Digital RE3 (raid edition drives) - pulled from storage pool, 60GB C:\ System, 238GB D:\ for VM Guests (VMWare Server, as Vail does not have HyperV) - RAID 1 on ARC
    • 2TBx2 Western Digitial EARS (green edition new advanced format, not raid friendly) - storage pool, all folders using duplication - Motherboard SATA
    • 1.5TBx1 Western Digital EARS (green edition new advanced format, not raid friendly, and different size than rest) - backup pool (only the critical folders set to be touched by backup) - Motherboard SATA
    • 2TBx6 Western Digital EADS (green edition, none advanced format, allows enabling of TLER) - pulled from storage pool, 7.4TB E:\ for media storage - RAID 6 on ARC

    I set it up this way, as I already had the EARS drives, and they are not RAID friendly with their error correction timings.  You have to be careful about, that, especially when you start talking more than 4 drives in an array.  The RAID was setup, as I wanted optimum performance on that volume, as well as dual drive failure coverage.  The raid card I've got Areca ARC-1222, provides ~110MB/sec writes with this configuration, around 30% faster than the DE managed volume with the same performance level disks (Yes, I have teamed NICs on a switch that supports 802.3ad) .  It's not hard to simply open explorer, create a share, and setup perms to the two users I've got on my home network.  The media volume is the only one that will ever grow past the ~1.5TB of usable space I've got in the DE volume as well, and this raid card supports RAID level/size migration.  The only bad part there, is you cannot upgrade say two drives at one time like you could with a DE volume.

    This is again fully unsupported, but I've been running like this for quite a while now, and have had no issues.  It works great, and with my system drive on RAID, my personal critical data on DE with Windows Backup as well as being nightly synchronized offside to S3 disk, my Media on a smoking fast RAID volume, support for multiple VMWare Guests, DHCP and DNS services turned on, and support for the few extras I use including Super Flexble File synchronizer (for backing up all my remote data to my WHS, as well as backing up my WHS to Amazon S3), and PS3 Media Server for streaming data to my home theater.  I am quite happy.  I also like the fact that this system is based on 2K8, so I can learn and use things that I don't get to do at work, and being 64bit, I was able to load it up with a Xeon 3430 Quad core and 8GB of memory for hosting more than one OS for my web development efforts as well!

    I really would have rather purchased 2k8 Standard for this machine, but shelling out over $1k for just the OS did not sit well with me.  It's too bad they don't give us power home users an option to purchase it at a more reasonable public sector rate.

    ** Note, it's a little strange, but the backup software in Vail insists that you backup the D:\ volume if you set it up like I did.  This must be due to the fact that it's part of the same physical volume as the System is using.  This has yet to cause problems, but I don't really need to backup the data on the D:\ drive.  I would open an issue on this, but it's pretty far outside the realm of supported configurations.

     


    BullDawg
    Sunday, October 31, 2010 8:41 PM
  • Maybe Aurora will meet your needs.
    https://connect.microsoft.com/SBS
    Aurora has no media handling capabilities, and I would expect it to be priced between Vail and SBS. In other words about the same as Server 2008 Std...
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, November 1, 2010 1:58 AM
    Moderator
  • Not only that, but I tried Aurora preview already as well, and it uses DE!  So, no real reason to make that switch... unless Aurora had HyperV, which I didn't check, but doubting it does.  I don't care about domain connectivity, as I only have a handful of systems at home, and its easy enough to just setup a couple users.

    Thursday, November 4, 2010 12:08 AM