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Install Software to server. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello all!

    Quick question,

    Can I install software, like office 2007, onto the windows home server and run it using my other computers that it is not directly installed on??

    -JM
    Tuesday, June 10, 2008 3:33 PM

Answers

  •  Lazerbeak wrote:
    One thing you could try is install the software on your client pc, then copy the offfice folder to the server, then try running it from there.

    it might work


    Office requires a large number of registry entries to function correctly. This absolutely will not deliver a fully functional office suite to users.
    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 2:57 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • You can install it and then run it from an RDP (remote desktop / terminal server session)

    Tuesday, June 10, 2008 3:39 PM
    Moderator

  • Do I always have to go threw a remote desktop, could I install it on the server, then place a shortcut to the exe file on the other computers....
    Tuesday, June 10, 2008 3:43 PM
  •  John McKnight wrote:

    Do I always have to go threw a remote desktop, could I install it on the server, then place a shortcut to the exe file on the other computers....
    No, because most software requires a lot of behind the scenes configuration to function.

    And installing it on the server for use through a Remote Desktop connection is a technical violation of the EULA.
    Tuesday, June 10, 2008 3:58 PM
    Moderator
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
    And installing it on the server for use through a Remote Desktop connection is a technical violation of the EULA.

     

    A violation of which EULA? Can also you please give the exact phrase in the EULA? Obviously If you're correct my answer is incorrect, however AFAIK you are allowed to install office software on WHS / W2K3 server and then access through RDP session. If you have single license you obviously you can run only instance of the office application at any one time. AFAIK this is fully legal, at least up to office 2003 (I don't have 2007)

     

     John McKnight wrote:


    Do I always have to go threw a remote desktop, could I install it on the server, then place a shortcut to the exe file on the other computers....

     

    Ken's comment on this issue is correct.

    If you want MSoffice on more then one computer and and you're not using it commercially you could also consider getting Office Home and Student Version. This is a lot cheaper to buy (around US$ 150) and you are allowed install it on THREE different computers. http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/suites/HA101655301033.aspx

    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 7:34 AM
    Moderator
  •  John McKnight wrote:
    Hello all!

    Quick question,

    Can I install software, like office 2007, onto the windows home server and run it using my other computers that it is not directly installed on??

    -JM



    One thing you could try is install the software on your client pc, then copy the offfice folder to the server, then try running it from there.

    it might work


    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 8:32 AM
  • Thanks!

     

    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 1:26 PM
  •  Lazerbeak wrote:
     John McKnight wrote:
    Hello all!

    Quick question,

    Can I install software, like office 2007, onto the windows home server and run it using my other computers that it is not directly installed on??

    -JM



    One thing you could try is install the software on your client pc, then copy the offfice folder to the server, then try running it from there.

    it might work


    Sure, if you're looking for trouble.
    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 2:04 PM
    Moderator

  • What is that all your going to say..... trouble...
    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 2:20 PM
  •  John McKnight wrote:
    Hello all!

    Quick question,

    Can I install software, like office 2007, onto the windows home server and run it using my other computers that it is not directly installed on??

    -JM


    Another option to try is a map network drive and install it there
    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 2:24 PM
  •  brubber wrote:
    A violation of which EULA?

    It's a technical violation of the WHS EULA, which restricts the use of Remote Desktop to administrative functions only. Using an office suite through Remote Desktop is not an administrative function.

    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 2:56 PM
    Moderator
  •  Lazerbeak wrote:
    One thing you could try is install the software on your client pc, then copy the offfice folder to the server, then try running it from there.

    it might work


    Office requires a large number of registry entries to function correctly. This absolutely will not deliver a fully functional office suite to users.
    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 2:57 PM
    Moderator
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
     Lazerbeak wrote:
    One thing you could try is install the software on your client pc, then copy the offfice folder to the server, then try running it from there.

    it might work


    Office requires a large number of registry entries to function correctly. This absolutely will not deliver a fully functional office suite to users.


    your probably right but he might as well try it out.


    Ive run office 95 Big Smile from a network share
    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 3:21 PM
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
     brubber wrote:
    A violation of which EULA?


    It's a technical violation of the WHS EULA, which restricts the use of Remote Desktop to administrative functions only. Using an office suite through Remote Desktop is not an administrative function.

     

    When I run winver and then open EULA there's no such restriction. This is for 120 day Trial version. Please don't tell me that the EULA for the OEM version is different.

     

    Such a restriction would also be in contrast with the intended uses of WHS which include (according to this WHS Team blog) Family Applictions, 3rd Party Platform, Enthousiast Playground. It would also be in contrast with this VERY interesting interview with Charlie Kindel on channel 9. This basically tells you that WHS was based on server core because it's intended NOT only for Home Users but also for Enthousiasts.

    Friday, June 13, 2008 3:27 PM
    Moderator
  • I'll have to get back to you on the exact location of that clause in the EULA, brubber. It's a standard restriction on the use of "Remote Desktop for Administration", though. And using WHS as a desktop, or as a traditional Terminal Services-style application server, is very far afield from the concept of an enthusiast playground. Not to mention that there are some serious side-effects of such use: for example users who have permission to log in to the server remotely through Remote Desktop are excluded from logging in through the Remote Access web site.
    Friday, June 13, 2008 4:33 PM
    Moderator
  • Okay, you'll find the complete EULA for the OEM software over here, but the relevant bit is 2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS d. Functionality Limitations:


    Code Snippet

    d. Functionality Limitations.

    · Active Directory - You may not use the server
    software as a domain controller or otherwise make
    use of DCPromo.exe. You also may not join the
    server software to any Active Directory domain.

    · Terminal Services - You may only use Terminal
    Services functionality to the extent required to
    manage the server software in Remote
    Administration Mode. You may not use Terminal
    Services for any other purpose.

    · Server Roles - You may not use server roles
    other than the roles that are already enabled
    during the server setup process.


    I'll ask if there are plans to change this, but I'd be surprised...
    Saturday, June 14, 2008 12:40 AM
    Moderator
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
    Okay, you'll find the complete EULA for the OEM software over here, but the relevant bit is 2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS d. Functionality Limitations:


    Code Snippet

    d. Functionality Limitations.

    · Active Directory - You may not use the server
    software as a domain controller or otherwise make
    use of DCPromo.exe. You also may not join the
    server software to any Active Directory domain.

    · Terminal Services - You may only use Terminal
    Services functionality to the extent required to
    manage the server software in Remote
    Administration Mode. You may not use Terminal
    Services for any other purpose.

    · Server Roles - You may not use server roles
    other than the roles that are already enabled
    during the server setup process.


    I'll ask if there are plans to change this, but I'd be surprised...

     

    OK thanks Ken. Clearly the EULA you are referring to is very much different from the one distributed on the 120 day evaluation version (I can mail this one to you if you don't have it at hand. IMHO this is REALLY REALLY BAD. When I get evaluation software it should at least contain the same limitations as the full product, so that I know what I get when I buy the software. Also I think the limitations are way to severe. With this EULA in place people are also NOT allowed to use the server as a DHCP or DNS server, E-mail server and so on. In fact there are published Add-ins on the wegotserved.co.uk site which violate this EULA!!!!

     

    Again, it's not only ment as Home Server or Enthusiast playground, intended uses of WHS which include (according to this WHS Team blog) Family Applictions, 3rd Party Platform,.......,........

     

    Also if it's meant to be an Enthousiasts playground please tell me how to do this in any other way then through Terminal Services? With these restrictions there's also no way you can develop and test Add-inn's. If you are correct and this is the current EULA it's about time MS / WHS-team reconsider this one, keeping the original targets in mind!!

     

    Also when I use Terminal Services to connect to my WHS when I try to help other users to solve their problem / answer their question this would be a violation of this EULA. Guess I have to stick to 120d eval version for some time. The EULA included with that one is much less restrictive.

    Saturday, June 14, 2008 8:19 AM
    Moderator
  • For those who want to run applications on the WHS and not violate the EULA (since you are not allowed to use terminal services to do this) please have a look at the Program Launcher Add-Inn. It allows you to run any program straight from the WHS console. IMHO doing it this way would not be a violation of the EULA.

    Saturday, June 14, 2008 8:32 AM
    Moderator
  • Yes, this is a different EULA. It's for production software. The eval EULA is for eval software, and has different restrictions. And I have the 120 day eval EULA on hand, thanks. Smile For one thing, it's in the eval software available for download on Connect. But I also have a stack of eval software sitting next to my desk that I give out to people. (Hmm, I'm down to 3; maybe it's time to get some more...)

    I've asked Microsoft specifically about that section of the OEM/system builder EULA, because I agree it's overly restrictive. But you're incorrect when you say that you can't develop add-ins. You can do that without any problem. An add-in will only work on Windows Home Server, but it doesn't have to be compiled on Windows Home Server, and there are ways to obtain the required DLLs without violating this section of the EULA. (It's easier with TS, of course.)

    Finally, it's a technical violation to use TS the way you do. And I do too, even though I've been aware of this section of the EULA for a long time. It's not something that Microsoft is going to chase us down for, and believe me, they know we do it. Smile But if you try to use your home server to get around licensing restrictions on other software (which might include expensive Micro$oft office suites, for example), Microsoft can point to the EULAs and say "Now pony up." Microsoft needs something in the WHS EULA that lets them control this type of use.
    Saturday, June 14, 2008 1:17 PM
    Moderator
  •  Ken Warren wrote:

    I've asked Microsoft specifically about that section of the OEM/system builder EULA, because I agree it's overly restrictive. But you're incorrect when you say that you can't develop add-ins. You can do that without any problem. An add-in will only work on Windows Home Server, but it doesn't have to be compiled on Windows Home Server, and there are ways to obtain the required DLLs without violating this section of the EULA. (It's easier with TS, of course.)

     

    Sure, you can do that, however not without any problem. When you develop a new app IMHO there's no way you can do this properly without debugging / testing the app on the intended platform. Also what's left of the "Enthousiast Playground" when you can't even TS into the box for other then "Administrative Tasks"

     Ken Warren wrote:
    Finally, it's a technical violation to use TS the way you do. And I do too, even though I've been aware of this section of the EULA for a long time. It's not something that Microsoft is going to chase us down for, and believe me, they know we do it. But if you try to use your home server to get around licensing restrictions on other software (which might include expensive Micro$oft office suites, for example), Microsoft can point to the EULAs and say "Now pony up." Microsoft needs something in the WHS EULA that lets them control this type of use.
    Not for me. I'm running evaluation version on my box, so in that respect I think I'm in the clear.

     

    Also like I said before there's Add-in's on the wegotserved website that are clear violations of this EULA. However WHS support website provides a direct link to this website. Makes you wonder how serious we (and any court if it would ever lead that far) should take these restrictive phrases in the EULA. 

     

    In addition to that you can install MS office on the server and get access to it using the Program Launcher Add-in without violating the EULA, even though it's effectively the same running the office software from a TS session. Personally I think there will be very few users interested in doing this, so why not just legalise this. MS already provides Office software for Home users for a very low price, something like 50 - 60 $ per computer, so IMHO there's really no need to run this from the server. It could be interesting though for those people that don't carry around a laptop but that want to work on documents on their server, but I think that's only a small group.

     

    Personally I would be pretty frustrated if I would buy the software after testing it for 120 days, only to find out that the so-called "production software" has a much more restrictive license. IMHO the 120 day eval version is should be identical in all respects to the production software, and actually I would expect the  EULA of the evaluation version to be more restrictive then the one of the full version.

     

    I would also be really interested to hear what the WHS-team (including Charlie Kindel) think about this, not what MS legal department thinks about this. If I read the blogpost and listen to the interview with Charlie Kindel I can't believe they are happy with this.

    Sunday, June 15, 2008 11:01 PM
    Moderator
  •  brubber wrote:
    I would also be really interested to hear what the WHS-team (including Charlie Kindel) think about this, not what MS legal department thinks about this. If I read the blogpost and listen to the interview with Charlie Kindel I can't believe they are happy with this.
    I asked. The answer is that the EULA is designed to restrict people from doing certain things that they really don't want end users doing with Windows Home Server: using it as a branch office server, using it as an application server, getting around the 10 user /10 computer limit, etc. The team is satisfied with the current wording, and doesn't see any reason to change it at present.
    Tuesday, June 17, 2008 2:09 AM
    Moderator
  •  Ken Warren wrote:
     brubber wrote:
    I would also be really interested to hear what the WHS-team (including Charlie Kindel) think about this, not what MS legal department thinks about this. If I read the blogpost and listen to the interview with Charlie Kindel I can't believe they are happy with this.

    I asked. The answer is that the EULA is designed to restrict people from doing certain things that they really don't want end users doing with Windows Home Server: using it as a branch office server, using it as an application server, getting around the 10 user /10 computer limit, etc. The team is satisfied with the current wording, and doesn't see any reason to change it at present.

     

    OK, thanks Ken. I think they have a valid point there, at least if they want prevent use as a branch office / office application server. Personally I still think it's overly restrictive for home users, however let's stop the discussion here. Thanks anyway for asking!

    Tuesday, June 17, 2008 5:26 AM
    Moderator