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  • Question

  • So I backed up a machine with a 500GB hard drive which had 14.7GB worth of data on it (including OS, that's 14.7GB total).  I went to restore it to a 160GB hard drive via the WHS Restore CD (i.e. removed the 500GB and replaced it with a 160GB) and on "Choose Volumes to Restore" I get a red 'X' between "C:Volume 1 (465.76GB)" and "C:New Volume 149.05GB".

    There doesn't appear to be a way to press 'Next' to get the thing to perform the restore.

    Now surely Microsoft isn't requring that the new drive be at least the same size as the old drive.  The new drive surely must be larger than that amount of data on the original drive.

    Right?

    So what is wrong here?

    Thanks in advance for any help.
    Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:34 AM

Answers

  • Hi Alex,
    as WHS restore is designed currently, the target volume of a restore procedure cannot be smaller than the source volume.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    • Marked as answer by Alex Barimo Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:59 AM
    Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:56 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Alex,
    as WHS restore is designed currently, the target volume of a restore procedure cannot be smaller than the source volume.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    • Marked as answer by Alex Barimo Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:59 AM
    Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:56 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Olaf.

    Thanks for your reply.

    So if I install Windows XP on a 1TB drive, and I'm only using 4GB on the 1TB drive, then when I do the restore I have to have a 1 TB drive or larger to perform the restore?

    Can that possibly be correct?

    If so all I can say is wow.

    Let me know if the above is wrong (sure sounds wrong, but I guess anything is possible).

    Thanks!
    Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:59 AM
  • Alex Barimo said:

    Hi Olaf.

    Thanks for your reply.

    So if I install Windows XP on a 1TB drive, and I'm only using 4GB on the 1TB drive, then when I do the restore I have to have a 1 TB drive or larger to perform the restore?

    Can that possibly be correct?

    Yes, that's correct.

    Alex Barimo said:

    If so all I can say is wow.

    Let me know if the above is wrong (sure sounds wrong, but I guess anything is possible).

    Thanks!



    Sunday, November 16, 2008 1:07 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Alex,
    Alex Barimo said:

    So if I install Windows XP on a 1TB drive, and I'm only using 4GB on the 1TB drive, then when I do the restore I have to have a 1 TB drive or larger to perform the restore?

    Can that possibly be correct?


    it's not the drive, it's the volume, which determines the size. So on a 1 TB drive you can have a much smaller volume for the OS (I prefer between 30 and 100 GB here, dependend from the OS and the overall disk size). I assume there is no simple way to calculate the real disk space needed to restore a certain partition due to the method data is stored in the Backup database, so this could be the reason to be bound to the original volume size as minimum. (And usually the disk size is only increasing, rarely increasing with replacements.)
    What you can try before you start a migration scenario, would be to resize the system partition - there are many 3rd party tools which do that job. If you run a successfull backup after that resize action you should be able to restore it as well.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Sunday, November 16, 2008 5:03 PM
    Moderator

  •  

    Hi Olaf.

    Yes, it's the volume.  In the case of a single 1TB drive with a single 1TB volume that has just the OS on it (say 4GB), you need an entire 1TB drive (or larger) to perform a restore.

    Looks like this has to do with Volume Shadow Service, or VSS.

    I take it you mean that PRIOR to performing the backup I should perform a shrink on the volume to be backed up.  In other words, I should delete the pagefile.sys file (obviously after turning it off), hiberfil.sys, and anything else that might not be movable, etc, and defrag the disk, then possibly use the shrink that is part of Vista (or what is in the 'disk manager' from the WHS restore CD).  The problem with this (assuming that I could get it to work, and besides the fact that it's work, and of course work that a normal home user would not be inclined to perform) is that it leaves me with volumes that I don't necessarily want.  Maybe I am planning on using the unused space on that original largely unused 1TB volume.


    Apparently there are people who are providing IDENTICAL drives (people on here who claim to be doing so) who are getting the 'red x'.  If so, I would suggest to “the WHS team” that they document this (at a minimum) and do something about it for a subsequent release of WHS.  Some people might claim that "this isn't a WHS problem, it’s a VSS problem!", or that I should feel "lucky" to be able to recover files.  Actually I wouldn't feel lucky if I encountered this problem after trying to restore my drive, and I would consider it a WHS problem, since under ordinary circumstances I'm not exposed to the vagaries of VSS, the immovability of pagefile.sys, and other technical mumbo jumbo that is completely outside the bounds of what a home user should be exposed to.

    Not sure what someone with a 1.5TB single volume drive would do if, after buying another 1.5TB drive, they get the ‘red x’.  Maybe they’d cry (or pray that sometime soon they could purchase a 2TB drive).


    Thanks for your response and have a good day.

    Monday, November 17, 2008 1:40 AM