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Windows XP Professional 1-2CPU key change problem RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi!

    I am a computer technician and today I've come across a new problem. I had to re-install Windows XP Professional 1-2CPU on a customers' old Dell Optiplex GX260. The PC had no recovery partition or a recovery disc with it, so I had to use an old backup copy of Windows XP Professional with SP1.

    During the installation, the system wouldn't accept the key from the COA on the side of his PC, so I used an old invalid key in order to finish the installation. Later I've updated it to SP2 from CD and went online to validate the installed Windows XP Professional now with SP2.

    No mather what I did though, the system just wouldn't let me change the key to the valid one. The message I'm getting is always the same and it tells me to check if I didn't misstype the new key.

    Now, I think the problem could be caused by the fact that the key is valid only for
    Windows XP Professional 1-2CPU. If there is a difference in keys for the XP Professional 1-2CPU and  XP Professional then my customer is in trouble. Is there any way I could make it work? Or is there a place where I could download the Windows XP Professional 1-2CPU from? The man had a valid Windows XP Professional 1-2CPU on his Dell before it died. He doesn't need a new key, just a copy of Windows XP Professional 1-2CPU.
    Sunday, January 20, 2008 11:53 PM

Answers

  • Mark_J_Sturges,

     

    Use this form http://support.dell.com/support/topics/global.aspx/support/change_order/tag_transfer?c=us&l=en&s=gen&redirect=1 to transfer ownership of the Dell from the previous owner to the new owner.  If you don't know the previous owner's name, Dell requires the Service Tag and the Express Service Code to transfer ownership.  Both are on the Dell sticker on the computer case.

     

    The computer was shipped from Dell with a recovery solution, either in the form of a recovery partition or an OS Reinstallation CD.   The customer is paying to replace that previously provided solution.

     

    As to your own upgrade on your Dell, you were attempting to violate the OEM End User Licensing Agreement by trying to move the originally installed OEM license for XP to another computer.  When you upgrade the motherboard to gain additonal performance or new function, for licensing purposes you are creating a new computer and cannot use the previous OEM license on it.  That is why Microsoft told you it was being used on another computer, which was the original configuration of your Dell.

     

    Why would you want to screw your friend by misusing his or her Windows Product Key?  Just buy a new license.

     

    Please visit www.microsoft.com/oem , sign up for free to become a registered partner, and use the free resources provided to learn about Microsoft licensing and products.

     

    Monday, January 21, 2008 3:31 PM
  • The simple fact is the Dell OEM Product Key affixed to a Dell computer is only valid with Dell's recommended recovery procedure.  This procedure requires a Dell OEM Windows XP Reinstallation CD.  If you choose not to contact Dell and order their Windows XP Reinstallation CD, then the Dell OEM Product Key is no longer valid.  Then you would have to purchase a conventional "full Version" of Windows XP which will include the proper CD and license.

     

    Monday, January 21, 2008 6:51 PM
    Moderator
  • Mark,

     

    Currently there really is not anything else which can be done. Dan and Carey have provided detailed information for procuring recovery media. Unfortuantely it appears the Optiplex GX 260 was procurred second hand without any of the original media. Past experiencing (speculating) Optiplex products are commonly used in business environments. In turn usually the business would install their image (with their VLK licensing) on the system and unfortunately this would wipe out the original restore image which came preinstalled on the machine. The best option would be is using the transferring document Dan provided into your client's name. Next work with Dell Technical support and request the original recovery media. We apologize for any inconvience for the problems your are experiencing. 

     

     

    Thank you,

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    Monday, January 21, 2008 11:55 PM

All replies

  • Mark_J_Sturges,

     

    Get a genuine Dell Windows XP OS Reinstallation CD for less than $15 from Dell and use it to do a correct installation.  Does the customer's OptiPlex 260 have a Certificate of Authenticity (CoA) for XP Pro from Dell?
    Monday, January 21, 2008 2:22 AM
  • If by CoA you mean the sticker on the side of the PC case, then yes. What I don't understand is why should he pay for it? Also, when you want something from Dell, you need your customer number and the name and address of the person who bought it. The PC is second-hand and no one knows those details. I was hoping MS had a download site for such cases.

    Dell are a pain to deal with if your XP goes down. About 8 months ago I had to reinstall XP on my own Dell PC after upgrading to a new MB with PCI-e slot. The key from my CoA sticker didn't work. Microsoft said it's been used on another PC, so clearly, somebody at Dell had stolen and used the key thinking I would never need to use it. Now Dell wouldn't even put me through to their support without paying for it and Microsoft doesn't care. They just told me to contact Dell about it. Now I'm using my friends' key, which means if he ever needs it, he is screwed.

    Thanks for your answer though.
    Monday, January 21, 2008 11:11 AM
  • Mark_J_Sturges,

     

    Use this form http://support.dell.com/support/topics/global.aspx/support/change_order/tag_transfer?c=us&l=en&s=gen&redirect=1 to transfer ownership of the Dell from the previous owner to the new owner.  If you don't know the previous owner's name, Dell requires the Service Tag and the Express Service Code to transfer ownership.  Both are on the Dell sticker on the computer case.

     

    The computer was shipped from Dell with a recovery solution, either in the form of a recovery partition or an OS Reinstallation CD.   The customer is paying to replace that previously provided solution.

     

    As to your own upgrade on your Dell, you were attempting to violate the OEM End User Licensing Agreement by trying to move the originally installed OEM license for XP to another computer.  When you upgrade the motherboard to gain additonal performance or new function, for licensing purposes you are creating a new computer and cannot use the previous OEM license on it.  That is why Microsoft told you it was being used on another computer, which was the original configuration of your Dell.

     

    Why would you want to screw your friend by misusing his or her Windows Product Key?  Just buy a new license.

     

    Please visit www.microsoft.com/oem , sign up for free to become a registered partner, and use the free resources provided to learn about Microsoft licensing and products.

     

    Monday, January 21, 2008 3:31 PM
  • Are you serious??? I am violating the OEM End User Licensing Agreement? Don’t get me started! Are you saying that when you buy a PC with windows on it and later want to upgrade you HW you are actually violating Microsoft??? Are we being punished for upgrades?

    I have paid 450 GBP for a rather crappy Dell Dimension 1100 with later upgrades in mind. I needed this PC for work. Within the price I must have paid for the pre-installed OS. By the way, I was well aware the pre-installed, pre-validated system wouldn’t work anymore. I take the CoA on the side of the case with a key on it is there exactly for situations when the OEM recovery is no longer possible. Otherwise it would be pointless to put it there as all Dell PC’s come pre-validated with a special VLK. Or do you know of any other reason for it being there?

    Interestingly enough, the key from the Dell PC case of a friend of mine worked just fine, thus confirming some Dell employee must have stolen and used the key from my CoA sticker. Or do you have another “violation” explanation for that?

    I believe (and I’m not alone) the arrogant and greedy “violated” asses of Dell and Microsoft should be kicked all the way to the moon for the way they’re treating their legitimate customers.

    Unless you can help, please consider this thread closed. I don't want to know about any supposed violations and paid services by Dell or Microsoft. I paid, I upgraded and then I was robbed.
    Monday, January 21, 2008 6:37 PM
  • The simple fact is the Dell OEM Product Key affixed to a Dell computer is only valid with Dell's recommended recovery procedure.  This procedure requires a Dell OEM Windows XP Reinstallation CD.  If you choose not to contact Dell and order their Windows XP Reinstallation CD, then the Dell OEM Product Key is no longer valid.  Then you would have to purchase a conventional "full Version" of Windows XP which will include the proper CD and license.

     

    Monday, January 21, 2008 6:51 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi, Carey Frish! Where did you get your info from?

    1;Dell's recommended recovery procedure is to either use the recovery partition or the Recovery CD if provided. Both already contain a pre-validated key (different from the one on the sticker) and OS restoration using these two sources ALWAYS results in a valid and activated Windows installation. That means you are completely wrong in assuming the Dell OEM Product Key affixed to a Dell computer is only valid with Dell's recommended recovery procedure. Put simply, no key is needed.

    2; I have used a real genuine DELL recovery CD to restore my system with the new MOBO. If you read my post carefully you'll see it was just the key from MY sticker that didn't work. Another key from another Dell PC worked perfectly well.

    That means this whole debate about OEM violations and specific Dell validations is absolutely pointless. It all boils down to this one and only issue: A DELL employee has written down and used my key before shipping. Only I had access to the sticker since then. Now, of course, Microsoft don't care and DELL want me to pay a fee in order just to put me through to the correct support department.

    Anyway, I started this thread with a different problem and that one has been resolved today.
    Monday, January 21, 2008 8:40 PM
  • Mark,

     

    Currently there really is not anything else which can be done. Dan and Carey have provided detailed information for procuring recovery media. Unfortuantely it appears the Optiplex GX 260 was procurred second hand without any of the original media. Past experiencing (speculating) Optiplex products are commonly used in business environments. In turn usually the business would install their image (with their VLK licensing) on the system and unfortunately this would wipe out the original restore image which came preinstalled on the machine. The best option would be is using the transferring document Dan provided into your client's name. Next work with Dell Technical support and request the original recovery media. We apologize for any inconvience for the problems your are experiencing. 

     

     

    Thank you,

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    Monday, January 21, 2008 11:55 PM
  • Hi Stephen,

    Thanks for your reply. Although English isn't my first language I always thought I spoke it well enough to make myself understood. Like I said in my last post the problem you are being so apologetic about has been resolved. Using a few tricks I managed to activate the customers Optiplex Windows XP with the CoA key. Now I saved the activation along with the whole system partition in case he manages to destroy his system again. Before you say I've violated some MS rule again, let me tell you the PC had a valid and activated Win XP on it when he bought it and the key was the same I used now.

    What I am so crossed about, and what the guys here have been discussing with me is a problem with my own Dell Dimension 1100 and XP Home Edition on it. I have described the problem in detail earlier in this thread and if you think you can help me, you would be the first MS person to ever do so. Everyone else from your gang I ever spoke or wrote to didn't give a ...t and neither did Dell. It is pretty obvious why my key doesn't work, but there is nobody at Dell that would listen and all MS does is telling me to contact Dell. It is a magic circle, which I understand, but cannot break as I am unwilling to pay twice for the same thing. If you can spare me one XP Home Edition key I would be most grateful, especially because I am using a friends key. If he ever needs it, he won't be able to use the one from his CoA sticker anymore. That means the key I need is really meant for his use in case of trouble. I told him that and so far he doesn't plan to do any upgrades. Still the point is my key has been stolen by a Dell employee.

    I can supply any information about his Dell PC purchase, which you can check with Dell. I have no receipt for my PC, but Dell have all my details.
    Tuesday, January 22, 2008 12:45 AM
  • Product key is technically bound to the HW. Before you uninstalled your OS, you should have logged out. Because the key and the HW have been integrated into one and could not be parted away. That is why they told you the previous key had been used in another PC. But if you computer completely broken down before you could have time to log out, you would be so unlucky that you have to be "robbed"! Just buy a new one!

    I'm a someone from mainland China, not a professional computer technician.

    Tuesday, January 22, 2008 1:13 AM
  • C'mon Winterman! Don't you understand that MY own never before used CoA key didn't work, but somebody elses did!!! I am getting really frustrated with these replies. Just use your LOGIC. If one CoA key doesn't work, but another does, it can only mean what MS say. The key is being used by another computer and it is not mine. I am not paying 95 GBP for a new licence. I have bought this PC with a licence and if other Dell customers can have a CoA with a valid key, why does mine not work?

    By the way, my PC didn't break down. I have upgraded the Mobo and before I did I have turned the PC off in a propper manner. Afterall, I am a professional computer technician. And I really don't think that it is just me who "was so unlucky to be robbed". I've worked for HP and I also frequently visit PC stores. I know how tempting it is for some people to steal, be it licence keys or pieces of HW.
    Tuesday, January 22, 2008 1:38 AM
  • Are you still in the tech field?  I do not mean to sound crude but if you are a tech you should have better resources.  You should have codes for reinstalling & upgrading. You should have BART to recover lost info along with virus protection software.  I am also a tech, not a hacker by no means but if you are upgrading or installing just to fix a computer you should be able to get the codes for free that match the CD and if you have the code and lost the matching software you should be able to get that for free.  I might get special treatment for working on school computers but I do not remember paying for anything other then the actual computer and if the OEM sticker is on it, that is all you need to get help from MS.  I know this is from 08 but I was reading and had to comment.  I hope if your still in the tech business you do not have to use anything illegally or borrow any numbers.  I have never had a problem with MS helping me.  Dell can actually scan your computer from the internet and get the code from it even if the warranty is expired. 

     

    Sorry was surfing for info on a Asus Laptop with a corrupt HD due to wrong drivers and it led me here.

     

    Thanks,

     

    Miracle

    Sunday, August 29, 2010 11:13 AM