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Hard Drive Temperatures RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have 3 internal drives in my EX470. On the bottom is the 500GB drive the machine came with. The next 2 slots have 1TB drives. The Disk Management add-in reports the following Celsius temperatures, reading from the bottom up: 37, 61, 32. Should I be overly concerned with the 61? It's been this way since the beginning, several months ago. "Hardware Status", under Settings, shows all green, with System = 32C and CPU = 26C.
    Monday, December 1, 2008 9:29 AM

Answers

  • If the drive is operating within specification (and it sounds like it is) I feel there's no need to do anything about it. Disk Management is, I think, reporting the S.M.A.R.T. reading, which is probably the drive case temperature.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Bobsie Tuesday, December 2, 2008 1:42 PM
    Tuesday, December 2, 2008 1:31 PM
    Moderator
  • It's possible that that one drive has an improperly calibrated temp sensor, also.  If you shut down then pull that drive out, is it really 60 degrees?? (be careful in case it is)

    It's not really behaving in spec, because they're talking about placing the drive into an ambient environment of that temperature.  But I think something abnormal is happening, either to create such excess heat (relative to a similar drive in an adjacent bay), or else the temp sensor is malfunctioning.

    Given how sensitive drives are, if there is a malfunction in the sensor, perhaps that's just a first sign something's not right.  I would probably get that drive out (ie get the data off it first), wipe it, then contact the vendor.  They'll have a utility to run (probably using a desktop machine not the server) that will look for trouble and will give you error codes.  If you get any error codes then they'll let you return the drive.  But sometimes drive problems are subtle--if you run the tests on the drive in a ventilated case and it's still giving you sky high temps, I would still try to use that data to get a return authorization even if there were no error codes.

    Lastly, if it really is that hot, maybe there's poor ventilation in the server case (failed fan? or drives too crowded).  If that's the case, then it's probably within spec, but I wouldn't want that state of affairs to continue.

    edit to add--I have the same server, but I haven't poked around the case yet (will someday soon do the RAM upgrade).  The case certainly seems "lacy" meaning it looks like there's a lot of mesh for airflow, but when disks are in the trays they look packed in there--I'm not sure there is adequate ventilation in the MediaSmart case.
    • Marked as answer by Bobsie Monday, December 22, 2008 11:55 PM
    Monday, December 22, 2008 2:57 PM

All replies

  • 61° C is rather high. What's the manufacturer's specification for the drive? If you don't exceed that, you should be okay. 
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, December 1, 2008 12:48 PM
    Moderator
  • Ken Warren said:

    61° C is rather high. What's the manufacturer's specification for the drive? If you don't exceed that, you should be okay. 


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)



    I found this at Seagate for the ST31000340AS:
    "Ambient temperature
    Ambient temperature is defined as the temperature of the environment immediately surrounding the drive.
    Actual drive case temperature should not exceed 69°C (156°F) within the operating ambient conditions.
    Above 1,000 feet (305 meters), the maximum temperature is derated linearly to 112°F (44°C) at 10,000 feet
    (3,048 meters).
    Operating: 0° to 60°C (32° to 140°F)
    Nonoperating: –40° to 70°C (–40° to 158°F)"

    This drive includes my duplicates & my PC backups, so it pretty much only operates during backup times. It is idle almost every time I look at Disk Management in the WHS Console.
    Monday, December 1, 2008 1:25 PM
  • Hi,

    I would be seriously considering removing that drive, especially if, as you say, it isn't running much. It may be necessary to add a further drive, if your remaining data drives don't have enough free space.
    FYI, my EX470 is running at 16C just now - and that's after a backup cycle.

    Colin



    If anyone answers your query successfully, please mark it as 'Helpful', to guide other users.
    • Marked as answer by Bobsie Monday, December 1, 2008 6:34 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by Bobsie Monday, December 1, 2008 6:34 PM
    Monday, December 1, 2008 5:06 PM
    Moderator
  • If the drive is operating within specification (and it sounds like it is) I feel there's no need to do anything about it. Disk Management is, I think, reporting the S.M.A.R.T. reading, which is probably the drive case temperature.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Bobsie Tuesday, December 2, 2008 1:42 PM
    Tuesday, December 2, 2008 1:31 PM
    Moderator
  • It's possible that that one drive has an improperly calibrated temp sensor, also.  If you shut down then pull that drive out, is it really 60 degrees?? (be careful in case it is)

    It's not really behaving in spec, because they're talking about placing the drive into an ambient environment of that temperature.  But I think something abnormal is happening, either to create such excess heat (relative to a similar drive in an adjacent bay), or else the temp sensor is malfunctioning.

    Given how sensitive drives are, if there is a malfunction in the sensor, perhaps that's just a first sign something's not right.  I would probably get that drive out (ie get the data off it first), wipe it, then contact the vendor.  They'll have a utility to run (probably using a desktop machine not the server) that will look for trouble and will give you error codes.  If you get any error codes then they'll let you return the drive.  But sometimes drive problems are subtle--if you run the tests on the drive in a ventilated case and it's still giving you sky high temps, I would still try to use that data to get a return authorization even if there were no error codes.

    Lastly, if it really is that hot, maybe there's poor ventilation in the server case (failed fan? or drives too crowded).  If that's the case, then it's probably within spec, but I wouldn't want that state of affairs to continue.

    edit to add--I have the same server, but I haven't poked around the case yet (will someday soon do the RAM upgrade).  The case certainly seems "lacy" meaning it looks like there's a lot of mesh for airflow, but when disks are in the trays they look packed in there--I'm not sure there is adequate ventilation in the MediaSmart case.
    • Marked as answer by Bobsie Monday, December 22, 2008 11:55 PM
    Monday, December 22, 2008 2:57 PM
  • I had a similar issue to start with. I resolved it by separating the drive slightly so there was an air gap between each.
    qts
    Tuesday, December 23, 2008 5:35 PM
  • Thanks, everyone. Seagate has offered to replace the drive under warranty.
    Friday, December 26, 2008 10:12 AM