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Windows keeps telling me my copy of Windows is not Genuine because of my motherboard RRS feed

  • Question

  • I recently had my motherboard go out on me and had it replaced. How can I get Windows to accept it as Genuine?
    Sunday, January 8, 2012 6:03 PM

Answers

  • Generally a motherboard change will invalidate an OEM license. At any rate the change likely triggered a need for phone activation.

     

     How to activate Windows 7 manually (activate by phone)

    1) Click Start, and in the Search box type:   slui.exe  4

    2) Next press the 'ENTER' key

    3) Select your 'Country' from the list.

    4) Choose the 'Phone Activation' option.

    5) Stay on the phone (do not respond to any of the automated prompts) and wait for a person to help you with activation.

    6) Explain your issue clearly to the support person.

     

     

    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, January 11, 2012 11:24 PM
    Sunday, January 8, 2012 6:10 PM
    Answerer
  • Please observe announcement 1 at the top of this page.

    In order to receive the best support, we request all users initially download and run the Genuine Diagnostics tool (MGADiag.exe) at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012. Click "Continue", click the "Copy" button then “Paste” the report into a reply message in your own thread.

    If your copy of Windows came preinstalled on your computer (OEM) you cannot get your new mobo to accept it.  OEM copies of Windows are only valid on the original motherboard.  Unless you replaced the mobo with the manufacturer's replacement part you need to replace Windows also.  This is from the Microsoft OEM FAQs at:

    http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/licensing_faq.aspx

    Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required. If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.

    If you upgraded the mobo (but not with the manufactuer's replacement part) you need to purchase a full license copy of Windows.  If you don't know whether your copy of Windows is the original OEM copy then post the MGADiag report as described in announcemnt 1.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Sunday, January 8, 2012 6:15 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Generally a motherboard change will invalidate an OEM license. At any rate the change likely triggered a need for phone activation.

     

     How to activate Windows 7 manually (activate by phone)

    1) Click Start, and in the Search box type:   slui.exe  4

    2) Next press the 'ENTER' key

    3) Select your 'Country' from the list.

    4) Choose the 'Phone Activation' option.

    5) Stay on the phone (do not respond to any of the automated prompts) and wait for a person to help you with activation.

    6) Explain your issue clearly to the support person.

     

     

    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Wednesday, January 11, 2012 11:24 PM
    Sunday, January 8, 2012 6:10 PM
    Answerer
  • Please observe announcement 1 at the top of this page.

    In order to receive the best support, we request all users initially download and run the Genuine Diagnostics tool (MGADiag.exe) at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012. Click "Continue", click the "Copy" button then “Paste” the report into a reply message in your own thread.

    If your copy of Windows came preinstalled on your computer (OEM) you cannot get your new mobo to accept it.  OEM copies of Windows are only valid on the original motherboard.  Unless you replaced the mobo with the manufacturer's replacement part you need to replace Windows also.  This is from the Microsoft OEM FAQs at:

    http://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/licensing_faq.aspx

    Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required. If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.

    If you upgraded the mobo (but not with the manufactuer's replacement part) you need to purchase a full license copy of Windows.  If you don't know whether your copy of Windows is the original OEM copy then post the MGADiag report as described in announcemnt 1.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Sunday, January 8, 2012 6:15 PM
    Answerer