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OCS + CUCM + CUPS => Extension mobility supported? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    Is it possible to RCC an extension mobility profile with MOC?  I want to use this in following scenario:

    -  User has a deskphone
    -  User is on the road and uses IP communicator.

    When in office he logs on using extension mobility. From this moment, MOC should control this device
    When on the road, he uses IPCommunicator and logges on using Extension Mobility. from this moment, MOC should use the IPC to control.

    In the Cisco documentation I find the following:

    Shared Lines: There are potential unwanted interactions that may occur in shared line scenarios. The CUPS procedure for selecting the device to be controlled by MOC is to login the MOC session. Upon sign-in, both devices associated with shared line will ring and the MOC user must answer the phone the user wishes to control. The unwanted feature interaction in this case include conflict in device and call control and indefinite ringing in cases where the user is away from both devices. This issue is also applicable for devices subscribed to extension mobility where selection of device to control procedures is similar to shared lines.

    Why is this applicable to Extension Mobility?  In this case, a user is only logged on to one phone at the same time?   Did somebody test this issue before?

    Thanks
    Friday, January 4, 2008 9:17 AM

All replies

  • Hi Roeben,

     

    When you have a shared line you need to use the MAC address to call out what phone you want to use with RCC in the Tel Uri. With extension mobility you have no fixed MAC address if the user has multiple profiles or has a shared line on another phone somewhere I think that is where you may have an issue. If you user has only one exentsion mobility profile and no other shared lines my guess is it would function normally. You would also have to ensure that a user can only log into one phone at a time which is configurable in Callmanager.

     

    Hope this helps. I would ask Cisco these questions as well.

     

    Cheers

    Chris

    Saturday, January 5, 2008 4:39 PM
  • Hi Roeben,

     

    This shouldn't be a problem in an RCC scenario. If the system detects that you are online on 2 different devices (example logged in on a phone, with a shared line on a fixed phone) OCS will call you. The phone you answer, will be your phone, used for RCC.

     

    Regards,

    Cedric

    Friday, February 29, 2008 4:10 PM
  • Hi Cedric,

     

    Not sure what you are talking about with your post, are you talking about Remote call control or using MOC as a softphone. Shared lines and RCC in Callmanager can have unexpected results if you dont call out the MAC address in tel URI in OCS, you can only control one phone at a time. As I mention in my post with extension mobility you have no fixed MAC address as you log in and out of different phones, unless you only plan on logging in to the same phone all the time. So if you plan to use RCC with extension mobility you can not have another shared line on a hard phone otherwise it may produce unexpected results. If you have just an extension mobility profile and no shared lines I believe this would work fine.

     

    Please let me know if you need more clarification. There is mention of the use of shared lines and extension mobility in CUPS documentation as well.

     

    Cheers

    Chris

    Friday, February 29, 2008 5:31 PM
  •  VoIPnorm wrote:

    Hi Cedric,

     

    Not sure what you are talking about with your post, are you talking about Remote call control or using MOC as a softphone. Shared lines and RCC in Callmanager can have unexpected results if you dont call out the MAC address in tel URI in OCS, you can only control one phone at a time. As I mention in my post with extension mobility you have no fixed MAC address as you log in and out of different phones, unless you only plan on logging in to the same phone all the time. So if you plan to use RCC with extension mobility you can not have another shared line on a hard phone otherwise it may produce unexpected results. If you have just an extension mobility profile and no shared lines I believe this would work fine.

     

    Please let me know if you need more clarification. There is mention of the use of shared lines and extension mobility in CUPS documentation as well.

     

    Cheers

    Chris



    Hi Chris,

    I'm talking about using MOC to type find a number, and then click the number which makes your ipphone dial. (not using moc as an audio-softphone!). Whenever I log on MOC, all the devices which share my tel URI extension, will call me. the device I answer the line from, will become the RCC device. As soon as I answer, the system hangs up again automatically. It learns the macaddress by doing that.

    (UCM 6.1.1a-2000-3 and CUPS 6.0.2)

    Regards,
    Cédric
    Monday, March 3, 2008 9:57 PM
  • Hi Cedric,

     

    I am not to sure what you mean about learning the MAC address of the IP phone you are controling. Can you please point me in the direction of the documentation that talks about this behaviour. As far as I was aware the only time a MAC address is passed in SIP mesages is when you specify it in the OCS configuration. This is also mentioned in CUPS documentation and is required when using shared lines. I have never heard of the behaviour you are describing but would like to know more. Are there any specific OCS or CUPS settings to enable this?

     

    Cheers

    Chris

    Tuesday, March 4, 2008 2:59 AM
  • Hi Cedric,

     

    Just thought I would follow up my last post with some info from the documentation. This was taken from documentaiton that describes 1.03 and as far as I know this information below hasnt changed according to the 6.0 documentation. Please let me know if you have some other sources of information.

     

    Also like to point you to the following Blog by Matt that talks about the same situation with CUPS 6.0

     

    https://blogs.pointbridge.com/Blogs/mcgillen_matt/Pages/Post.aspx?_ID=21

     

    Mat does a great job of describing the problem with 3 phones.

     

     

    Excerpt from Cisco documentation;

     

    Enter the Tel URI.

    Cisco recommends that you use the following format for the TEL URI:

    tel:xxxx;phone-context=dialstring

    where

    xxxx also specifies the directory number that the CTI Manager reports

    back to Cisco Unified Presence Server as the calling or called number

    when a call gets placed.

    phone-context=dialstring enables the MOC client to control one of

    the devices that are associated with the directory number.

    If you enter the device ID, the MOC client can only control that particular

    device; for example:

    tel:xxxx;phone-context=dialstring;device=SEP0002FD3BB5C5

    If you enter the partition, the MOC client specifies the partition for the

    directory number; for example:

    tel:xxxx;phone-context=dialstring;device=SEP0002FD3BB5C5;partition

    =myPartition

    If you do not enter the device ID in the TEL URI, CTI Gateway determines

    the devices that are associated with the line directory number. If only one

    device is associated with the line DN, CTI Gateway uses that device.

    If you do not enter the device ID in the TEL URI and two devices are

    associated with the line DN (shared line), CTI Gateway uses the following

    rules to select a device:

    If one of the two devices is Cisco IP Communicator and its status is

    registered, CTI Gateway uses that device.

    If one of the two devices is Cisco IP Communicator, but it is not

    registered, CTI Gateway uses the alternate hard device.

    If two hard devices exist on the shared line, CTI Gateway monitors the

    two devices while making a call on the shared line. When the user

    answers, CTI Gateway monitors that device.

    If more than two devices are associated with a line DN, you must specify

    the desired device in the TEL URI.

     

    ===========================================================

    And also:

    Shared Lines

    Potential unwanted interactions can occur when Microsoft Office Communicator (MOC) controls a line

    (extension and phone), and the extension is a shared line with multiple users.

    If an inbound call on the shared line is answered by another user on the shared line, MOC displays

    control of the call incorrectly.

    If another user on the shared line assumes control of a call with hold/resume, MOC loses control of

    that call.

    In general, MOC works well for a single-user, home or office environment, or even in a

    manager/assistant two-user environment, but unwanted feature interactions can occur with multiuser

    shared lines.

    Call Forwarding

    When a user forwards a call to another extension from an IP phone, the enabled MOC client for this

    phone may not recognize the forwarding change.

    After the users log in, they can choose the default device for calling phone

    numbers, either the phone or the computer.

    Note If the user specifies computer as the default device, Cisco Unified

    Presence Server does not get integrated with LCS.

    For detailed information on how to

    configure Microsoft Office Communicator

    2005, refer to the Microsoft Office

    Communicator online help.

    You can also find more information about

    Microsoft Office Communicator 2005 at the

    following URL:

    http://www.office.microsoft.com/en-us/assi

    stance/HA011992481033.aspx#Deploymen

    tGuide

    In MOC configuration, choose Microsoft Office Outlook as the personal

    information manager, if appropriate.

    For detailed information on how to

    configure Microsoft Office Communicator

    2005, refer to the Microsoft Office

    Communicator online help.

    You can also find more information about

    Microsoft Office Communicator 2005 at the

    following URL:

    http://www.office.microsoft.com/en-us/assi

    stance/HA011992481033.aspx#Deploymen

    tGuide

    Table 10 Microsoft Office Communicator 2005 Configuration Checklist (continued)

    Configurations Steps Related Documentation

    34

    Cisco Unified Presence Server Deployment Guide, Release 1.0(3)

    OL-12016-01

    Obtaining Documentation

    To have both the MOC client and the phone recognize the forwarding change, forward the call by using

    MOC.

    Cisco Extension Mobility

    When you configure Cisco Extension Mobility, be aware of the following guidelines:

    Ensure that end-user Cisco Extension Mobility profile names do not start with SEP.

    Ensure that physical phone device names always start with SEP.

    Ensure that Cisco IP Communicator device names always start with SEP.

    When an end user who is controlling a Cisco Extension Mobility line with MOC logs in to or logs out

    from the phone, MOC loses control of the line. The user must log in or log out from MOC to regain

    control of the line.

    Note If the user logs out of MOC and then logs back in while on a call, MOC may not display the correct call

    status.

     

    Cheers

    Chris

    Tuesday, March 4, 2008 3:23 AM
  • Hi Cedric,

     

    I found some information about what you mentioned in your earlier posts on shared lines and the phone ringing you to select the device you want to control. Thought it migh be handy to reproduce it here as not everyone will beware that this feature exists. If you know of any other documentation on this feature can you please share it.

     

    Shared Lines: There are potential unwanted interactions that may occur in shared line scenarios. The CUP procedure for selecting the

    device to be controlled by MOC is to login the MOC session. Upon sign-in, both devices associated with shared line will ring and the

    MOC user must answer the phone the user wishes to control. The unwanted feature interaction in this case include conflict in device

    and call control and indefinite ringing in cases where the user is away from both devices. This issue is also applicable for devices

    subscribed to extension mobility where selection of device to control procedures is similar to shared lines.

     

    There has been some updates to the following Cisco document on CUPS RCC integration to OCS:

     

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucme/pbx/interop/notes/617030nt.pdf

     

    Cheers

    Chris

    Wednesday, June 11, 2008 4:01 PM
  • To fix your problem, Cisco has release a Snappin to the MOC client.  You can install this to your MOC client to allow the OCS user to select which devices they want to control during the login session of the OCS.  It's a drop down menu and works well.  So this should solve your issue.

    http://cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cups/7_0/english/integration_notes/IntegrationNoteOCS_CUP70_MOCCallControl.html#wp53643

    INS
    Saturday, February 14, 2009 5:58 AM
  • Voipnorm: 
    Hmm, that updated cisco cups integration guide still has no words, and why to fill those settings seen on the 50+ page of screenshots, without any comments :) 

    For a non-cisco expert, like me it is very difficult to understand the use of that document, and the possibility to point my finger on the cisco partner if the integration project is broken because of them.

    Tommer12: thanks for the cisco plugin info, however I am not sure I can freely download it. 
    Monday, February 23, 2009 3:09 PM
  • Using the following document in conjunction with the screenshot version should help you out

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cups/7_0/english/integration_notes/IntegrationNoteOCS_CUP70_MOCCallControl.html

    This is basically just a written version of the screen shot document. Of course to download the software may require a CCO account which I am sure the Cisco partner that did your install should be able to get for you.

    Good luck pointing that finger:-)

    Cheers
    Chris
    Chris http://voipnorm.blogspot.com/
    Monday, February 23, 2009 4:01 PM