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Windows 7 Upgrade is IMPOSSIBLE RRS feed

  • Question

  • I originally purchased a computer with Windows Vista with an upgrade promised for Windows 7. I was sent the upgrade disc; I installed it and the upgrade worked. Much later I reinstalled my OS and now I cannot get windows to recognize that I have a valid OS. I never received a product key with my disc, but I am told that the process should automatically validate windows. I called DELL and spent hours on the phone trying to resolve this issue but could not.

    I attempted to contact support, but apparently I cannot without paying for it. The Windows 7 upgrade process is hopelessly broken. I have reinstalled my OS at least 10 times, in various ways, with the Windows 7 upgrade disc. Someone please explain to me what to do.

    I ran a tool that someone said to run in another thread. It is called "Windows Genuine advantage Diagnostic tool". Should I paste the output of that tool to this post?

    Saturday, October 8, 2011 5:29 AM

Answers

  • I suspect that Dell provided an OEM System Builder disk and that does not automatically activate.  You need a key.  You must have gotten one originally or you could not have activated.

    There is nothing wrong with the upgrade process.  You just need a key.  The original Vista was a Type 2, OEM SLP copy and those do not require manual activation.

    Quit reinstalling.  That has nothing to do with your problem.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, October 11, 2011 8:38 PM
    Saturday, October 8, 2011 6:57 AM
    Answerer
  • "Kyle12M" wrote in message news:797207e8-c9bc-447c-93d1-34f119aace79...

    I originally purchased a computer with Windows Vista with an upgrade promised for Windows 7. I was sent the upgrade disc; I installed it and the upgrade worked. Much later I reinstalled my OS and now I cannot get windows to recognize that I have a valid OS. I never received a product key with my disc, but I am told that the process should automatically validate windows. I called DELL and spent hours on the phone trying to resolve this issue but could not.

    I attempted to contact support, but apparently I cannot without paying for it. The Windows 7 upgrade process is hopelessly broken. I have reinstalled my OS at least 10 times, in various ways, with the Windows 7 upgrade disc. Someone please explain to me what to do.

    I ran a tool that someone said to run in another thread. It is called "Windows Genuine advantage Diagnostic tool". Should I paste the output of that tool to this post?

     
    You neglected to enter your Product Key for Windows 7 – the Key in use here is the Default Key.
    Check the paperwork that came with the upgrade disk – it should have the Key in it somewhere.
    Once you find it, use that Key together with the Change Product Key link at the bottom of the System properties page, and then activate by phone.
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, October 11, 2011 8:38 PM
    Saturday, October 8, 2011 10:05 AM
    Moderator
  • Colin and Noel are correct.

      The person you talked to at dell was misinformed.  All Windows require a Product Key and there is only one type of (consumer level) Product Key that does not normally require the user to manually enter the key.  This key is known as an OEM SLP key.  It comes Pre-installed in PCs built by large manufactures.  This type of key will self-activate when it detects the proper Bios Flag in the PC's motherboard.  The Manufacturer is the one that places the Bios Flag in the motherboard and that Bios is specific to the version of Windows to be installed on that PC.  Meaning if the PC is intended to have Vista per-installed, the manufacturer will add their Vista specific Bios Flag.

      Now, if the Dell person you talked to was correct and your Upgrade didn't need you to manually entera Product Key, that would mean they sent you an OEM SLP version of Windows 7 (that had the OEM SLP key pre-installed in the Windows software).  That would not work on your PC because your PC was originally intended for Vista and would have the Vista Bios Flag.  A Windows 7 OEM SLP key would not work with a Vista Bios Flag.

      So, since we know that Dell didn't send you a OEM SLP version of Windows 7, as an upgrade, we know it must have been either a Retail version or an OEM System Builder version (which is what most, if not all, manufacturers sent for the Windows 7 upgrade promotions).  Both of these versions require a Product Key be manually entered and activated by the user.

      This is why Colin and Noel have been insisting that you need a Product key to use that Windows 7 upgrade, because there is no other way it could work.

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, October 11, 2011 9:02 PM
    Tuesday, October 11, 2011 9:02 PM

All replies

  • Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Diagnostic Tool Output

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 0
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-74XYM-BH4JX-XM76F
    Windows Product Key Hash: KeYfcvXg/a1Q01x73+f8IL/JC4Y=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-112-0000007-85866
    Windows Product ID Type: 5
    Windows License Type: Retail
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003
    ID: {DD5864DB-74B3-4539-939B-1777713D1BF9}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7600.win7_gdr.110622-1503
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{DD5864DB-74B3-4539-939B-1777713D1BF9}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-XM76F</PKey><PID>00359-112-0000007-85866</PID><PIDType>5</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-3019166717-1237877216-314574625</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Model>Inspiron 1440                   </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>A02</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20090615000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>10A83C07018400F8</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM><OEMID>DELL  </OEMID><OEMTableID>WN09   </OEMTableID></OEM><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7600.16385

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, RETAIL channel
    Activation ID: 2e7d060d-4714-40f2-9896-1e4f15b612ad
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00359-00170-112-000000-00-1033-7600.0000-2772011
    Installation ID: 008136039665265800011084816130033323880773200276730364
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: XM76F
    License Status: Initial grace period
    Time remaining: 37620 minute(s) (26 day(s))
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 3
    Trusted time: 10/8/2011 1:23:07 AM

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: 0x00000000
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000
    Event Time Stamp: 10:5:2011 23:30
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: MAAAAAEAAgABAAIAAAABAAAAAgABAAEA6GE0+/rAen/osGBXylhC4FY7EANKmEbK

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20001
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: yes
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name    OEMID Value    OEMTableID Value
      APIC            DELL          WN09  
      FACP            DELL          WN09  
      HPET            DELL          WN09  
      MCFG            DELL          WN09  
      SLIC            DELL          WN09  
      OSFR            DELL          WN09   
      SSDT            PmRef        CpuPm


    Saturday, October 8, 2011 5:30 AM
  • I suspect that Dell provided an OEM System Builder disk and that does not automatically activate.  You need a key.  You must have gotten one originally or you could not have activated.

    There is nothing wrong with the upgrade process.  You just need a key.  The original Vista was a Type 2, OEM SLP copy and those do not require manual activation.

    Quit reinstalling.  That has nothing to do with your problem.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, October 11, 2011 8:38 PM
    Saturday, October 8, 2011 6:57 AM
    Answerer
  • "Kyle12M" wrote in message news:797207e8-c9bc-447c-93d1-34f119aace79...

    I originally purchased a computer with Windows Vista with an upgrade promised for Windows 7. I was sent the upgrade disc; I installed it and the upgrade worked. Much later I reinstalled my OS and now I cannot get windows to recognize that I have a valid OS. I never received a product key with my disc, but I am told that the process should automatically validate windows. I called DELL and spent hours on the phone trying to resolve this issue but could not.

    I attempted to contact support, but apparently I cannot without paying for it. The Windows 7 upgrade process is hopelessly broken. I have reinstalled my OS at least 10 times, in various ways, with the Windows 7 upgrade disc. Someone please explain to me what to do.

    I ran a tool that someone said to run in another thread. It is called "Windows Genuine advantage Diagnostic tool". Should I paste the output of that tool to this post?

     
    You neglected to enter your Product Key for Windows 7 – the Key in use here is the Default Key.
    Check the paperwork that came with the upgrade disk – it should have the Key in it somewhere.
    Once you find it, use that Key together with the Change Product Key link at the bottom of the System properties page, and then activate by phone.
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, October 11, 2011 8:38 PM
    Saturday, October 8, 2011 10:05 AM
    Moderator
  • No, I do not need a key. Like I said, a product key was not provided. If you do not believe me, call Dell, they can confirm that Windows 7 upgrade discs were not shipped with product keys for upgrades from Vista->7.
    • Edited by Kyle12M Tuesday, October 11, 2011 4:49 PM
    Tuesday, October 11, 2011 4:39 PM
  • "Kyle12M" wrote in message news:b933da3f-d482-4f24-9377-589976caf046...
    No, I do not need a key. Like I said, a product key was not provided. If you do not believe me, call Dell, they can confirm that Windows 7 upgrade discs were not shipped with product keys for upgrades from Vista->7.
     
     
    Since Dell did not actually provide the disks, they could not comment.
    They were actually shipped from a third-party company.
     
    The Upgrade disks use OEM_NSLP Keys and do not require a “Windows marker version: 0x20001” which your computer seemingly has. What they DO require is a personal Product Key, which  was sent to you at the same time (although maybe not in the same package) as the disk.
     
    The fact that your PC apparently has a “Windows marker version: 0x20001” begs the question of whether you have attempted to circumvent activation by some means, since as far as I’m aware, that marker was not issued until Win 7 was released, and certainly should not be present on any machine which was not shipped with Win 7.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, October 11, 2011 5:13 PM
    Moderator
  • Colin and Noel are correct.

      The person you talked to at dell was misinformed.  All Windows require a Product Key and there is only one type of (consumer level) Product Key that does not normally require the user to manually enter the key.  This key is known as an OEM SLP key.  It comes Pre-installed in PCs built by large manufactures.  This type of key will self-activate when it detects the proper Bios Flag in the PC's motherboard.  The Manufacturer is the one that places the Bios Flag in the motherboard and that Bios is specific to the version of Windows to be installed on that PC.  Meaning if the PC is intended to have Vista per-installed, the manufacturer will add their Vista specific Bios Flag.

      Now, if the Dell person you talked to was correct and your Upgrade didn't need you to manually entera Product Key, that would mean they sent you an OEM SLP version of Windows 7 (that had the OEM SLP key pre-installed in the Windows software).  That would not work on your PC because your PC was originally intended for Vista and would have the Vista Bios Flag.  A Windows 7 OEM SLP key would not work with a Vista Bios Flag.

      So, since we know that Dell didn't send you a OEM SLP version of Windows 7, as an upgrade, we know it must have been either a Retail version or an OEM System Builder version (which is what most, if not all, manufacturers sent for the Windows 7 upgrade promotions).  Both of these versions require a Product Key be manually entered and activated by the user.

      This is why Colin and Noel have been insisting that you need a Product key to use that Windows 7 upgrade, because there is no other way it could work.

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, October 11, 2011 9:02 PM
    Tuesday, October 11, 2011 9:02 PM
  • The only action I've taken to activate my Windows 7 operating system is reinstalling it multiple times using the "custom" and "upgrade" choices. I have proof of purchase (if you count emails confirming my purchase from Dell, which include information about my free upgrade), and I have activated my OS before from Vista->7. I was told by multiple people at Dell that my Windows 7 upgrade disc did not come with a product key. How can I get a free product key, considering I've already purchased this product?

    Also, the fact that a "Windows marker version" value that shouldn't be showing up is showing up, is not very comforting. But I am a software developer and I can assure you if I wanted to "steal" this product I wouldn't be talking to you right now, I'm sure there are cracked versions all over the internet. I simply want what is rightfully mine; a product I paid for and am continuously being given conflicting information about.

    • Edited by Kyle12M Wednesday, October 12, 2011 1:28 PM
    Wednesday, October 12, 2011 1:22 PM
  • "Kyle12M" wrote in message news:2bae1216-dbc5-4d86-947d-ce36767330bb...
    The only action I've taken to activate my Windows 7 operating system is reinstalling it multiple times using the "custom" and "upgrade" choices. I have proof of purchase (if you count emails confirming my purchase from Dell, which include information about my free upgrade), and I have activated my OS before from Vista->7. I was told by multiple people at Dell that my Windows 7 upgrade disc did not come with a product key. How can I get a free product key, considering I've already purchased this product?
     
     
     
    The emails from Dell are irrelevant – as I said the provisioning of the Upgrade offer was through a third party. Unless you can provide some form of proof from that company that  you ordered *and received* a copy of the upgrade disk and a key, then you’re SOL.
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Wednesday, October 12, 2011 1:30 PM
    Moderator
  • Hello Kyle12M,

    I have encountered many Dell Vista-to-W7 upgrade packages, which were given to Dell customers who purchased a Dell computer during the transition phase between Vista and W7.

     

    Here is a typical example--this package has a plain black and white instruction booklet in many languages, plus two discs; a gray Dell W7 Upgrade Assistant 64-bit disc (P/N VJ2H2) and a red-orange Dell W7 Upgrade Option WVista HP to W7 HP 64-bit disc (P/N XFDDW).  The OS disc has "For use only as an Upgrade to a Qualifying Dell Windows 7 Upgrade Option PC" printed on it.  The OS disc sleeve has a Certificate of Authenticity affixed to it, with the product listed as "Win Vista HmPrm - Win 7 HmPrm UPG Fulfill".  The CoA has a product key on it.

     

    Can you tell us the part number of your Dell Windows 7 upgrade disc?  Can you provide a picture?  Or can you report what is printed on the disc?  Did the disc come with a Certificate of Authenticity, and if so what is the product description (the first line), and is there a product key on it?  Do NOT post the product key.


    Wednesday, October 12, 2011 2:14 PM
  • Noel,

    The emails are not irrelevant because they are proof that I ordered, paid for, and received a Dell laptop computer that came with a free upgrade to Windows 7. You questioned my integrity with your statement "The fact that your PC apparently has a “Windows marker version: 0x20001” begs the question of whether you have attempted to circumvent activation by some means". I responded by saying that I have proof that my purchase of Windows 7 was genuine. What thread are you reading...?

    Dan,

    I will provide a picture of my disc and any other information I can find on the disc/in the documentation I have. If there was a product key with the disc we wouldn't be having this discussion.

    Thursday, October 13, 2011 8:26 PM
  • All of this begs the question.  You MUST have a product key for the type of Windows license identified in your report. 

    Windows Product ID Type: 5
    Windows License Type: Retail

    If something has happened to it and you can't find it or don't know where it was in the first place then you can only cure the problem by contacting Dell or purchasing a new Windows 7 license.  Microsoft cannot give you the product key if it was issued through Dell.  Dell may not be able to give it to you either.  For certain, Type 5 Retail licenses do NOT have an embedded product key like Type 2 OEM SLP licenses do.  Continuing to reinstall is pointless.

    The product key in your report is the default key inserted by the Windows installer when the user either chooses not to enter a product key at the time of installation or does not have one.  It is not a unique key and for that reason is blocked on the Microsoft activation servers.

    There is nothing to be gained from continuing to argue the point.  I refer you to Darin Smith's (MSFT) reply above.

     


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Thursday, October 13, 2011 9:19 PM
    Answerer
  • Colin,

    I am not arguing the point anymore, and I haven't been for the past few posts. I am explaining that I was misinformed and requesting assistance. Unfortunately Microsoft typically has crappy customer service, so I am not surprised to hear that they will not provide me with another product key. The lack of a process to help customers with this is absurd since the product key itself doesn't cost any money; the software costs money, and I've already paid for the software.

    Thursday, October 20, 2011 7:54 PM
  • So did you reinstall the original Windows Vista operating system that originally came preinstalled on your Dell PC and then perform the upgrade to Windows 7?
    Carey Frisch
    Thursday, October 20, 2011 8:07 PM
    Moderator
  • There is no point to argue, as far as I can see.

    Your current install is non-genuine for reason. If you are not prepared to correct that reason, then you have to accept the restrictions.

    You have not - either here, or elsewhere - yet shown any willingness to research your problem. As such all we can assume is the worst.

     


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Thursday, October 20, 2011 8:13 PM
    Moderator
  • Colin,

    I am not arguing the point anymore, and I haven't been for the past few posts. I am explaining that I was misinformed and requesting assistance. Unfortunately Microsoft typically has crappy customer service, so I am not surprised to hear that they will not provide me with another product key. The lack of a process to help customers with this is absurd since the product key itself doesn't cost any money; the software costs money, and I've already paid for the software.


    Kyle,

    You have it backwards.  Microsoft owns the software.  You own the product key.  The product key determines the license and that defines your rights.  In fact the price for Windows is for the license.  Section 8 of the End User License Agreement is clear that you did not purchase the software:

    "8.         SCOPE OF LICENSE. The software is licensed, not sold. This agreement only gives you some rights to use the features included in the software edition you licensed. Microsoft reserves all other rights. "


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Thursday, October 20, 2011 8:30 PM
    Answerer