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Moderator discourtesy and abuse #2

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  • AnswerFile name too long cannot copy

    • Tuesday, September 01, 2009 7:58 PMMaflagulator Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       
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      I'm running the 7100 build...enjoying it except for one big thing:

      While attempting to copy 402gb from my main storage volume onto a spare 500gb drive (for the purpose of changing to a new RAID array) I've come across something that I would expect a Windows 98 OS to give me.

      It tells me that a file has TOO LONG of a file name, then provides with two unhelpful options: SKIP or CANCEL

      I never had XP give me an issue like this at all, so what gives? And while some specific files did have long file names (such as for songs, etc.) it had 7 issues with folders stating that their name was too long, but in fact they were not since they were titled '07-06-07' for the date that I dumped the audio files in them. However, they may have contained FILES with long file names though.



      Anyone else get this same situation? Perhaps the RTM version does not do this? Can anyone verify this regarding their install of the RC or the RTM?

      It made it through 400gb out of the 402gb transfer.

      I'm just happy to see that it doesn't spazz out about an issue like this until it has done all the other transfers that it can do because it saves the issues it has with files until the very end. In XP it would spazz about it the moment it came across it causing the transfer process to halt.

    Answers

    • Wednesday, September 02, 2009 3:02 PMjmhonzell Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
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      Path limit is 248 characters.
      Path+Filename limit is 260 characters.

      Exceeding either will result in the error mentioned.
      Simplify your folders and titles.
    • 33 minutes agojmhonzell Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
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      Windows 2000 has a 254 character limit.
      Windows XP has a 255 character limit.
      Windows Vista has a 260 character limit.

      Each application/API handles long filenames differently, so BEWARE:
        Nero 6 could only handle 108 characters, but it didn't tell you that. Instead, it burned the disc and truncated the filename resulting in garbage.
        QuickTime 2006 could only handle 63 characters. Oops to all those podcasts titles.
        Even Mac systems advertised 255 characters, but the shell could only handle 31 characters until OS X.

      While there are a few workarounds, they are limited in how they can be used and becomes somewhat inconvenient if you are handling lots of files:
         From the command prompt only.
         May overwrite other data in the filename record resulting in loss of information: (ie. attributes, creation date, starting location for file, etc.)

      "What should I do?"

      The answer was already proposed: Simplify your titles.

    All Replies

    • Wednesday, September 02, 2009 2:05 PMMaflagulator Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       
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      BUMP.....

      Could anyone please attempt to verify this?  Wouldn't you like to know if this might be a problem for you down the road?  AHEM!!


        ~Scott
    • Wednesday, September 02, 2009 2:56 PMCarey FrischMVP, ModeratorUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       
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      Please review the responses and answers in this previous thread: Error: "Windows cannot copy file. The filename or extension is too long."
      Carey Frisch
    • Wednesday, September 02, 2009 3:02 PMjmhonzell Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
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      Path limit is 248 characters.
      Path+Filename limit is 260 characters.

      Exceeding either will result in the error mentioned.
      Simplify your folders and titles.
    • 18 hours 54 minutes agoMaflagulator Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       
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      Path limit is 248 characters.
      Path+Filename limit is 260 characters.

      Exceeding either will result in the error mentioned.
      Simplify your folders and titles.

      What were the limitations for those under Windows XP?  I never had this issue under XP.

        ~Scott
    • 14 hours 9 minutes agodеrosnеc Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       Proposed Answer
      You cannot vote on your own post
      1

      See this MSDN article:  http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa365247(VS.85).aspx#path_names_and_namespaces  (Build date: 8/27/2009)



      Maximum Path Length

      In the Windows API (with some exceptions discussed in the following paragraphs), the maximum length for a path is MAX_PATH, which is defined as 260 characters. A local path is structured in the following order: drive letter, colon, backslash, components separated by backslashes, and a terminating null character. For example, the maximum path on drive D is "D:\<some 256 character path string><NUL>" where "<NUL>" represents the invisible terminating null character for the current system codepage. (The characters < > are used here for visual clarity and cannot be part of a valid path string.)

      Note  File I/O functions in the Windows API convert "/" to "\" as part of converting the name to an NT-style name, except when using the "\\?\" prefix as detailed in the following sections.

      The Windows API has many functions that also have Unicode versions to permit an extended-length path for a maximum total path length of 32,767 characters. This type of path is composed of components separated by backslashes, each up to the value returned in the lpMaximumComponentLength parameter of the GetVolumeInformation function (this value is commonly 255 characters). To specify an extended-length path, use the "\\?\" prefix. For example, "\\?\D:\<very long path>". (The characters < > are used here for visual clarity and cannot be part of a valid path string.)






      EDIT:

      I posted this info 13:37 later, even reduced it down to the minimum, but it is being deleted by some abusive renegade moderator.



      Use ROBOCOPY.  It is an MS Command Prompt utility that supercedes XCOPY.  I just tested it with a 251.3 filename (created in the root C:\) and it works almost without hitch.  You'll want to experiment carefully before relying on it.

    • 7 hours 24 minutes agogeotso Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       
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      The Windows API has many functions that also have Unicode versions to permit an extended-length path for a maximum total path length of 32,767 characters.


      Well, that's in theory but I can't make it work...
      For example I have a file G:\[251 characters file name].txt and I want to move it in G:\Documents. However when I try to drag it to the destination (in Windows Explorer) I get a message like: file name or path is too long.
      What should I do?
    • 33 minutes agojmhonzell Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       Answer
      Vote As Helpful
      Windows 2000 has a 254 character limit.
      Windows XP has a 255 character limit.
      Windows Vista has a 260 character limit.

      Each application/API handles long filenames differently, so BEWARE:
        Nero 6 could only handle 108 characters, but it didn't tell you that. Instead, it burned the disc and truncated the filename resulting in garbage.
        QuickTime 2006 could only handle 63 characters. Oops to all those podcasts titles.
        Even Mac systems advertised 255 characters, but the shell could only handle 31 characters until OS X.

      While there are a few workarounds, they are limited in how they can be used and becomes somewhat inconvenient if you are handling lots of files:
         From the command prompt only.
         May overwrite other data in the filename record resulting in loss of information: (ie. attributes, creation date, starting location for file, etc.)

      "What should I do?"

      The answer was already proposed: Simplify your titles.
    • 3 minutes agoZeus76 Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       
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      How will that help somebody who already has a 251.3 filename in some folder?


      ROTFLMAO
      It won't.

      But renaming through a command box (cmd.exe) when run as administrator usually works quite nicely.

      Regards

      Rem
    • a few seconds agodеrosnеc Users MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers MedalsUsers Medals
       
      You cannot vote on your own post
      0

      You cannot gain access to a 251.3 filename except if it is in the root c:\.   You cannot get it there unless you use ROBOCOPY or equivalent.  COPY or XCOPY or REN or even DEL won't work.  Neither will the Explorer GUI.

      So, the OP is hosed if he already has 251.3.  That's Carey's solution.  Hosed.  Big green checkmark, that.

    Thursday, September 3, 2009 5:07 PM

All replies

  • People asking the same questions all the time without reading previous posts about the same subjects made me stroll away from this website. Nowadays... just dropping in from time to time.

    As far as your question is concerned... Some moderators do have too many rights. I don't know whether it is censorship or narrowmindedness. If I were you... I'd have a drink an let go. If there weren't stupid people around we couldn't think of ourselves as superior human beings couldn't we?

    Just let go.

    Bye for today

    Rem

    PS who blocked the long filename thread???
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 5:22 PM


  • That was from locked thread   Locked  File name too long cannot copy



    Some moderators just want to conceal problems, rather than provide solutions.




    Best Regards, Zeus.

    Derosnec

    Thursday, September 3, 2009 5:32 PM
  • I think there should be identification of who has locked a thread and the reason for locking it.

    Just as I think there should be the same for deletions and reports of abuse.

    It's time for the moderators to own up for their actions.
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 10:41 PM