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Why would windows 7 professional 64-bit re-activate over a year after installation & activation? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Just a bit curious & annoyed. I purchased & installed windows 7 pro 64-bit over a year ago & installed it the very day it arrived. The installation & activation went smoothly (no problems.) Suddenly, today, it just gave me the message that activation had succeeded! I've never had any reason to think it needed re-activation. What  in the world is going on? Why would it just decide to activate again after all this time?
    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 1:56 AM

Answers

  •   To explain a little more in detail:  Reactivation is required when the 'master' Hardware ID significantly changes from the Hardware ID that was recorded during the last successful Activation.  This 'master' Hardware ID is made up of the Hardware IDs of many of the Hardware pieces that make up the PC.  When hardware is changed up, added or removed, this changes the 'master' hardware ID a little (or sometimes allot).  If you change, add or remove more hardware, this changes the 'master' Hardware ID a little (or allot) more. Eventually the master Hardware ID will change enough to require Windows to need to be reactivated.  (we call this a Hardware Out of Tolerance)

      However, starting back in Vista, we started to find that the some Hardware Drives would change the individual Hardware ID of the hardware the driver controlled. Because of this, sometimes Windows will need to be reactivated without ever having changed any physical hardware.

     

      As Carey explained, this is expected and normal behavior and is nothing to be alarmed about.

     

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, August 18, 2011 9:12 PM
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 9:12 PM
  • Sometimes a hardware device ID number may change when a driver update is installed...nothing to be alarmed about.
    Carey Frisch
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, August 18, 2011 9:12 PM
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 2:37 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  •   In order to receive the best support, we request all users initially download and run the Genuine Diagnostics tool (MGADiag.exe) at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012. Click "Continue", click the "Copy" button then “Paste” the report into a reply message in this thread.

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 4:55 AM
    Answerer
  • Sometimes a hardware device ID number may change when a driver update is installed...nothing to be alarmed about.
    Carey Frisch
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, August 18, 2011 9:12 PM
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 2:37 PM
    Moderator
  • "Carey Frisch" wrote in message news:814bcbb7-034d-42c5-9487-1c6711759ae9...
    Sometimes a hardware device ID number may change when a driver update is installed...nothing to be alarmed about.
    Carey Frisch
     
     
    Such a change will not normally bring about a re-activation request, unless it’s the motherboard drivers.
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 7:51 PM
    Moderator
  • You haven't been around this forum long enought to have a thorough understanding of all the intricacies of product activation.
    Carey Frisch
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 8:09 PM
    Moderator
  •   To explain a little more in detail:  Reactivation is required when the 'master' Hardware ID significantly changes from the Hardware ID that was recorded during the last successful Activation.  This 'master' Hardware ID is made up of the Hardware IDs of many of the Hardware pieces that make up the PC.  When hardware is changed up, added or removed, this changes the 'master' hardware ID a little (or sometimes allot).  If you change, add or remove more hardware, this changes the 'master' Hardware ID a little (or allot) more. Eventually the master Hardware ID will change enough to require Windows to need to be reactivated.  (we call this a Hardware Out of Tolerance)

      However, starting back in Vista, we started to find that the some Hardware Drives would change the individual Hardware ID of the hardware the driver controlled. Because of this, sometimes Windows will need to be reactivated without ever having changed any physical hardware.

     

      As Carey explained, this is expected and normal behavior and is nothing to be alarmed about.

     

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, August 18, 2011 9:12 PM
    Thursday, August 18, 2011 9:12 PM