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Windows 7 Genuine Advantage error RRS feed

  • Question

  • Is there a valid reason that Windows goes invalid after repairing the computer?

    We replaced the MB on a Gateway that suffered a power surge.

    Wouldn't the CPU have been a better choice in authentication?

    Fixing hardware should not invalidate the license for the OS, unless the reason is to inconvenience the end user, and make them switch to Apple.

    Friday, January 14, 2011 7:38 AM

Answers

  • "The User of This PC" wrote in message news:7ac97425-3046-4ad4-be83-dea53c5d3c28...

    Is there a valid reason that Windows goes invalid after repairing the computer?

    We replaced the MB on a Gateway that suffered a power surge.

    Wouldn't the CPU have been a better choice in authentication?

    Fixing hardware should not invalidate the license for the OS, unless the reason is to inconvenience the end user, and make them switch to Apple.


    The OEM Key with which all such machines are installed is locked to the motherboard on which it is first installed. This is what reduces the price of the OS (together with the lack of support from MS - Retail licenses have a certain entitlement to direct support from MS, while OEM ones must be supported by the manufacturer) to the low price that manufacturers are prepared to pay.
    Replacement of the motherboard by the manufacturer under warranty conditions does not invalidate the license, because the manufactuer can still support the new motherboard - but it would be expecting too much of any manufacturer to support motherboards which the know nothing about, and which may be radically different to any which they would otherwise install on any machine they sell.
    Locking to the CPU would actually restrict the customer more, not less, as currently they can upgrade the CPU so long as it still operates on the original motherboard. Relatively few people will in fact either replace the motherboard, or upgrade the CPU - most will replace a broken machine with a new one, or replace an older model with a newer one, rather than upgrade the board. It's up to the repair shop to explain the licensing consequences of motherboard replacement to the customer, as they should be aware of them, while the customer quite possibly either never read the license terms at all (if, for example, they either bought the machine second-hand, or weren't the ones who conducted the initial OOB installation), or skipped through it very quickly without understanding the restrictions. Any repair shop which is 'surprised' by the invalidity of an OEM license after motherboard replacement probably won't be in business for long, as it's been a factor since at least 1991, even if it has only effectively been enforced since the release of XP in 2001.
     
     
     
     

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    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Saturday, January 15, 2011 12:44 AM
    Friday, January 14, 2011 9:17 AM
    Moderator