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Multi-master synchronization - What's it mean? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I work on an app that is file based.  I am evaluating P2P technologies seeking a technology that can basically synchronize a file folder between multiple clients.  Is this what the term "Multi-master synchronization" means?


    Use Case Example:
    • Five clients want to collaborate
    • If client1creates a new file, it should propogate to all others
    • If client4 appends additional data to file created by client1, it should propogate to all others
    • Files will not be modified, but can be appended
    The Microsoft Synchronization Framework is attractive as the app I work with is developed in C#.  I am concerend about the Sync Framework's maturity, robustness, and reliability.  I have not seen adopters of this framework outside of what appears to be Microsoft research related projects.  However, the technology is attractive as an easy way to collaborate without having to setup a server.  Please correct me if I am wrong.

    Thanks in advance,

    -Ed

    • Moved by Max Wang_1983 Thursday, April 21, 2011 10:10 PM forum consolidation (From:SyncFx - Technical Discussion [ReadOnly])
    Wednesday, April 16, 2008 2:14 AM

Answers

  •  

    Hi Ed,

     

    Short of the fact that SQL Server 2008 is one of the first ship vehicles for the technology, we cannot talk to future release vehicles or platforms for the Microsoft Sync Framework (unless an NDA is in place)

     

    However, to answer your question - we use multi-master to refer to the fact that the data can be modified by any node in the mesh of loosely connected endpoints and that we're not dictating a hub/spoke topology to enable sync. (Changes can flow from any endpoint and make their to any other node while the metadata guarantees correct conflict detection and change enumeration)

     

    Hope this helps!

    -Moe

     

    Wednesday, April 16, 2008 5:01 AM

All replies

  •  

    Hi Ed,

     

    Short of the fact that SQL Server 2008 is one of the first ship vehicles for the technology, we cannot talk to future release vehicles or platforms for the Microsoft Sync Framework (unless an NDA is in place)

     

    However, to answer your question - we use multi-master to refer to the fact that the data can be modified by any node in the mesh of loosely connected endpoints and that we're not dictating a hub/spoke topology to enable sync. (Changes can flow from any endpoint and make their to any other node while the metadata guarantees correct conflict detection and change enumeration)

     

    Hope this helps!

    -Moe

     

    Wednesday, April 16, 2008 5:01 AM
  • HI Moe,

     

    Thank you for your reply. SQL Server 2008 sounds like more than just a test bed for the Microsoft Sync Framework. 

     

    I need to revisit the "Favorites" sample application.  At first try it was not inutitive to me how to configure the Favorites sample application and I did not see documentation on how to use it.  If I am successful with "Favorites" I will start looking for a multi-master demo or figure out what it takes to create my own.

     

    Thanks again!

     

    -Ed

    Sunday, April 20, 2008 4:12 PM