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Windows Vista upgraded to Win7 now says Not Genuine RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello.  Windows Vista that came pre-installed on a Toshiba laptop was upgraded to Windows 7 using the free upgrade option.  The upgrade went fine and it did not ask to be activated.  It did ask for a product key, which Toshiba said to skip because the upgrade does not require a key.  After a while (possibly about 30 days) it popped up saying it was not a genuine copy of Windows 7 and would not activate.

    We called Toshiba who told us to call Microsoft who told us to call Toshiba.

    The Windows 7 free upgrade did not come with its own Product Key and Toshiba claims it should simply upgrade without a hitch.  Microsoft claims Windows 7 requires its own product key.  Toshiba says to reinstall Windows Vista and then upgrade to Windows 7 again, however if Win7 does require its own product key, it will be a royal waste of time to reinstall everything only to find out it doesn't work again in 30 days.

    Some more information on this would be helpful.  If it does require a product key then Toshiba failed at understanding their own ____ and we can use the information gathered here when contacting them again in the future.

    Here is the diagnostic report.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: N/A, hr = 0xc004f012
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-74XYM-BH4JX-XM76F
    Windows Product Key Hash: KeYfcvXg/a1Q01x73+f8IL/JC4Y=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-112-0000007-85920
    Windows Product ID Type: 5
    Windows License Type: Retail
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003
    ID: {B826CF66-E7FA-45C3-84A6-5FAA250BFE59}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7600.win7_gdr.100226-1909
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 100 Genuine
    Microsoft Office Enterprise 2007 - 100 Genuine
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: B4D0AA8B-604-645_025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3_E2AD56EA-765-d003_E2AD56EA-766-0_E2AD56EA-134-80004005_E2AD56EA-765-8009_E2AD56EA-766-2ee7_E2AD56EA-148-80004005_16E0B333-89-80004005_B4D0AA8B-1029-80004005

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{B826CF66-E7FA-45C3-84A6-5FAA250BFE59}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-XM76F</PKey><PID>00359-112-0000007-85920</PID><PIDType>5</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-2547823882-3215522444-3120926077</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>TOSHIBA</Manufacturer><Model>Satellite L500</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>TOSHIBA</Manufacturer><Version>V1.10</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="5"/><Date>20090518000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>13B83607018400F8</HWID><UserLCID>1009</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM><OEMID>TOSCPL</OEMID><OEMTableID>TOSCPL00</OEMTableID></OEM><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>100</Result><Products><Product GUID="{91120000-0030-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE}"><LegitResult>100</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Enterprise 2007</Name><Ver>12</Ver><Val>52591A040915EAC</Val><Hash>gwNJ3lVnEIvcCPw0Pw09IkctywI=</Hash><Pid>81599-854-6916184-65258</Pid><PidType>1</PidType></Product></Products><Applications><App Id="15" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="16" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="18" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="19" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="1A" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="1B" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="44" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="A1" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="BA" Version="12" Result="100"/></Applications></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7600.16385

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, RETAIL channel
    Activation ID: 2e7d060d-4714-40f2-9896-1e4f15b612ad
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00359-00170-112-000000-00-1033-7600.0000-1382010
    Installation ID: 008205342641681345203731301490923323337232720234901350
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: XM76F
    License Status: Notification
    Notification Reason: 0xC004F009 (grace time expired).
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 4
    Trusted time: 21/07/2010 9:35:31 PM

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: N/A
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000
    Event Time Stamp: N/A
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: LAAAAAEAAQABAAIAAAABAAAAAQABAAEAeqi6UmBU2nqQoa5YWsLM4ZB8Rso=

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes
    Windows marker version: 0x20001
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: yes
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name    OEMID Value    OEMTableID Value
      APIC            PTLTD              APIC 
      FACP            TOSCPL        CRESTLNE
      HPET            INTEL         CRESTLNE
      BOOT            PTLTD         $SBFTBL$
      MCFG            INTEL         CRESTLNE
      SLIC            TOSCPL        TOSCPL00
      OSFR            TOSHIB        A+2nd ID
      SSDT            BrtRef        DD01BRT
      SSDT            BrtRef        DD01BRT


     

    Thursday, July 22, 2010 1:50 AM

Answers

  •   Should I have received a Windows 7 Upgrade key with the Upgrade disc, or should an upgrade without entering a key work, assuming a fresh, factory Vista install?  The reason I ask is if it does require a key, reinstalling everything won't work and I will need to call Toshiba to complain more.


    In your case, yes.

    There is OEM Software (usually installed at the factory) that has an OEM SLP product key already entered.  When Windows sees the OEM SLP key, it checks the computer's Bios for the Proper OEM Bios flag.  If the proper flag is found, Windows will self-activate.

    OEM Bios Flags are specific to the Manufacturer And to the version of Windows it is good for.  That means an OEM Bios Flag for Vista (which your computer originally came with) would not be the proper OEM Bios Flag for Windows 7.

    So, either they need to provide you a Windows 7 Product Key or they need to help you flash the computer's Bios with a Bios that containes the Proper OEM Bios Flag for that version of Windows 7 and the Windows 7 OEM SLP key so windows will self-activate. Either way, it's on them to help you fix the issue.

     


    Darin MS
    Thursday, July 22, 2010 7:08 PM

All replies

  • According to your report (Windows License Type: Retail), you have a retail Windows 7 Home Premium edition. installed.  Retail licenses always require a product key.  If you received the upgrade disk from Toshiba, then you need to ask them for the corresponding product key.
    Carey Frisch
    Thursday, July 22, 2010 2:26 AM
    Moderator
  • "Mason7" wrote in message news:7d8199e2-a2fb-4ad3-84b1-919cbf6e5f12...

    Hello.  Windows Vista that came pre-installed on a Toshiba laptop was upgraded to Windows 7 using the free upgrade option.  The upgrade went fine and it did not ask to be activated.  It did ask for a product key, which Toshiba said to skip because the upgrade does not require a key.  After a while (possibly about 30 days) it popped up saying it was not a genuine copy of Windows 7 and would not activate.

    We called Toshiba who told us to call Microsoft who told us to call Toshiba.

    The Windows 7 free upgrade did not come with its own Product Key and Toshiba claims it should simply upgrade without a hitch.  Microsoft claims Windows 7 requires its own product key.  Toshiba says to reinstall Windows Vista and then upgrade to Windows 7 again, however if Win7 does require its own product key, it will be a royal waste of time to reinstall everything only to find out it doesn't work again in 30 days.

    Some more information on this would be helpful.  If it does require a product key then Toshiba failed at understanding their own ____ and we can use the information gathered here when contacting them again in the future.

    Here is the diagnostic report.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: N/A, hr = 0xc004f012
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-74XYM-BH4JX-XM76F
    Windows Product Key Hash: KeYfcvXg/a1Q01x73+f8IL/JC4Y=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-112-0000007-85920
    Windows Product ID Type: 5
    Windows License Type: Retail
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003

     


    Interesting - the Key that's in use on this machine is a Retail one.
    The Key is also the 'Keyless Install' Key - which would fit with you not having entered a key during the install - which cannot be activated.
     
    I suspect that what happened was that you did a Clean install from the DVD, rather than an upgrade install starting from within Windows Vista - this could result in this scenario.
     
    Darin (or Carl, or Dan) may confirm it - but I suspect that what you will need to do is to re-read the instructions for performing the upgrade, and then do a full System recovery to factory-fresh in Vista, and repeat the upgrade from within Vista.
     
    You could first try using the COA Key on the Sticker on the base of the laptop (or in the battery compartment), and the Change Product Key option at the bottom of the System Properties page - it *may* work.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Thursday, July 22, 2010 2:34 AM
    Moderator
  • According to your report (Windows License Type: Retail ), you have a retail Windows 7 Home Premium edition. installed.  Retail licenses always require a product key.  If you received the upgrade disk from Toshiba, then you need to ask them for the corresponding product key.
    Carey Frisch
    I couldn't have done an upgrade from Vista with a retail version, right?  I just looked at the Win7 disc again and it is indeed a Windows 7 upgrade disc, complete with the Toshiba logo on it.  Since no product key was entered, how would it know it's a retail version?  How could it upgrade Vista to 7?
    Thursday, July 22, 2010 4:04 AM
  • Interesting - the Key that's in use on this machine is a Retail one.
    The Key is also the 'Keyless Install' Key - which would fit with you not having entered a key during the install - which cannot be activated.
     
    I suspect that what happened was that you did a Clean install from the DVD, rather than an upgrade install starting from within Windows Vista - this could result in this scenario.
     
    Darin (or Carl, or Dan) may confirm it - but I suspect that what you will need to do is to re-read the instructions for performing the upgrade, and then do a full System recovery to factory-fresh in Vista, and repeat the upgrade from within Vista.
     
    You could first try using the COA Key on the Sticker on the base of the laptop (or in the battery compartment), and the Change Product Key option at the bottom of the System Properties page - it *may* work.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    No, I definitely did an upgrade from within Vista and followed the instructions laid out by Toshiba. I know because it took over 6 hours to do the upgrade :(  The only thing that was different from Toshiba's screenshots of the upgrade process was the fact that I had to enter a key (and skip it).  Toshiba tech support told me to skip it when I mentioned that screen on the phone to them. 

    I did try re-entering the Vista key from the bottom of the laptop and it just says the key is invalid.

    There was a time limit on ordering the Win7 free upgrade, and it was ordered within that time limit.  Is there perhaps a time limit on when it needed to be installed and activated?  The upgrade disc was laying around for a few months before it was installed.

    I really appreciate the fast responses here by the way!

     

     

    Thursday, July 22, 2010 6:26 AM
  • "Mason7" wrote in message news:0558cd80-a60b-4cae-a9b0-f935b49e753d...
    Interesting - the Key that's in use on this machine is a Retail one.
    The Key is also the 'Keyless Install' Key - which would fit with you not having entered a key during the install - which cannot be activated.
     
    I suspect that what happened was that you did a Clean install from the DVD, rather than an upgrade install starting from within Windows Vista - this could result in this scenario.
     
    Darin (or Carl, or Dan) may confirm it - but I suspect that what you will need to do is to re-read the instructions for performing the upgrade, and then do a full System recovery to factory-fresh in Vista, and repeat the upgrade from within Vista.
     
    You could first try using the COA Key on the Sticker on the base of the laptop (or in the battery compartment), and the Change Product Key option at the bottom of the System Properties page - it *may* work.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    No, I definitely did an upgrade from within Vista and followed the instructions laid out by Toshiba. I know because it took over 6 hours to do the upgrade :(  The only thing that was different from Toshiba's screenshots of the upgrade process was the fact that I had to enter a key (and skip it).  Toshiba tech support told me to skip it when I mentioned that screen on the phone to them. 

    I did try re-entering the Vista key from the bottom of the laptop and it just says the key is invalid.

    There was a time limit on ordering the Win7 free upgrade, and it was ordered within that time limit.  Is there perhaps a time limit on when it needed to be installed and activated?  The upgrade disc was laying around for a few months before it was installed.

    I really appreciate the fast responses here by the way!

     

     


    There is no time limit on the install - for the reason that reinstalls may be required.
    Check the packaging that came with the disk again - it should, AFAIK, have included a Key on a sticky label. Whoever at Toshiba said otherwise was not using their mouth :)
     

    seems to be the extent of their support for the process - which is not exactly prolific. Their presence in their own forums is minimal at best.
     
    Did You use the Upgrade Assistant, or not?
     
    Did you make a set of Recovery disks before the upgrade?
     
    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Thursday, July 22, 2010 7:39 AM
    Moderator
  • There is no time limit on the install - for the reason that reinstalls may be required.
    Check the packaging that came with the disk again - it should, AFAIK, have included a Key on a sticky label. Whoever at Toshiba said otherwise was not using their mouth :)
     

    seems to be the extent of their support for the process - which is not exactly prolific. Their presence in their own forums is minimal at best.
     
    Did You use the Upgrade Assistant, or not?
     
    Did you make a set of Recovery disks before the upgrade?
     
    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Yes, I used the upgrade assistant and it managed some specific toshiba software, removing it prior to the upgrade and reinstalling some of it when it was finished.

    I did not make a set of recovery discs unfortunately, but I do think it came with one that will restore it to factory default, something I had hoped to avoid.

    It definitely did not come with a sticky label with its own key.  Toshiba has said repeatedly (two different phone reps) that it does not require a key and they do not have a key to give us.

    I just thought of a possibility.  While Vista was still installed, a few months before upgrading to Win7, the laptop was taken to a computer store to fix a wireless network driver problem.  They never actually fixed it, but they most likely reinstalled Vista while attempting to fix it.  Would it be possible that they used a retail disc to install over top of the oem version it came with, using the key from the bottom of the laptop? Would that turn it into a "retail" version?  Thus when I upgrade it to Win7, it becomes a "retail" version as well and now requires activation (but has no key to activate).

    Would they be able to use the key from the bottom of the laptop with a retail disc?  I don't think they'd have used an actual retail key to attempt to fix it. I also thought oem / retail was determined by the key not the physical disc, but I thought I would post the idea anyway.  I'll do anything to avoid reinstalling.  Just.. painfully slow.

    Thanks again for the help!

     

     

     

    Thursday, July 22, 2010 9:05 AM
  • "Mason7" wrote in message news:12932259-9536-4e93-8ae1-02137f56651c...
    There is no time limit on the install - for the reason that reinstalls may be required.
    Check the packaging that came with the disk again - it should, AFAIK, have included a Key on a sticky label. Whoever at Toshiba said otherwise was not using their mouth :)
     

    seems to be the extent of their support for the process - which is not exactly prolific. Their presence in their own forums is minimal at best.
     
    Did You use the Upgrade Assistant, or not?
     
    Did you make a set of Recovery disks before the upgrade?
     
    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Yes, I used the upgrade assistant and it managed some specific toshiba software, removing it prior to the upgrade and reinstalling some of it when it was finished.

    I did not make a set of recovery discs unfortunately, but I do think it came with one that will restore it to factory default, something I had hoped to avoid.

    It definitely did not come with a sticky label with its own key.  Toshiba has said repeatedly (two different phone reps) that it does not require a key and they do not have a key to give us.

    I just thought of a possibility.  While Vista was still installed, a few months before upgrading to Win7, the laptop was taken to a computer store to fix a wireless network driver problem.  They never actually fixed it, but they most likely reinstalled Vista while attempting to fix it.  Would it be possible that they used a retail disc to install over top of the oem version it came with, using the key from the bottom of the laptop? Would that turn it into a "retail" version?  Thus when I upgrade it to Win7, it becomes a "retail" version as well and now requires activation (but has no key to activate).

    Would they be able to use the key from the bottom of the laptop with a retail disc?  I don't think they'd have used an actual retail key to attempt to fix it. I also thought oem / retail was determined by the key not the physical disc, but I thought I would post the idea anyway.  I'll do anything to avoid reinstalling.  Just.. painfully slow.

    Thanks again for the help!

     

     

     


    It is a distinct possibility that the repair shop did something like what you suggest - although they should have used either the Recovery disks, or at least the COA key from the sticky label on your machine for the reinstall. Did you notice anything different about the machine when you got it back from them? - was any software missing or different from before? The sort of thing that often changes is the CD/DVD burning software, or the Anti-Virus.
    As you say - it's usually the Key that determines OEM/Retail - but it's quite possible to use a Retail disk for an OEM install (but not usually the other way around). The Key also determines which edition of Windows you get installed.
    The best thing I think you can do now is try the procedure here....
     It may work!
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Thursday, July 22, 2010 11:26 AM
    Moderator
  • Hello Mason7,

    I am assuming the Toshiba W7 Upgrade installation disc and the Toshiba Upgrade Assistant disc were shipped separately from the computer and arrived by post or courier.

    Did you get a Certificate of Authenticity (CoA) to accompany the W7 Upgrade Disc?


    Buy Office 2007 Now, Get Office 2010 Free http://office2010.microsoft.com/en-us/tech-guarantee/microsoft-office-2010-technology-guarantee-FX101825695.aspx?CTT=97
    Thursday, July 22, 2010 3:23 PM
  • It is a distinct possibility that the repair shop did something like what you suggest - although they should have used either the Recovery disks, or at least the COA key from the sticky label on your machine for the reinstall. Did you notice anything different about the machine when you got it back from them? - was any software missing or different from before? The sort of thing that often changes is the CD/DVD burning software, or the Anti-Virus.
    As you say - it's usually the Key that determines OEM/Retail - but it's quite possible to use a Retail disk for an OEM install (but not usually the other way around). The Key also determines which edition of Windows you get installed.
    The best thing I think you can do now is try the procedure here....
     It may work!
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    No, I did not notice any major changes to the OS as you describe.  I'm pretty sure they did not format it because all the documents and software were still present.  If the key determines the product type, then that whole idea couldn't have happened unless they used their own retail product key when reinstalling.  Which would be stupid of them.

    I suppose I will give that site a try, but I still need a confirmation on the key.  Should I have received a Windows 7 Upgrade key with the Upgrade disc, or should an upgrade without entering a key work, assuming a fresh, factory Vista install?  The reason I ask is if it does require a key, reinstalling everything won't work and I will need to call Toshiba to complain more.

    Thanks!

     

    Thursday, July 22, 2010 3:30 PM
  •   Should I have received a Windows 7 Upgrade key with the Upgrade disc, or should an upgrade without entering a key work, assuming a fresh, factory Vista install?  The reason I ask is if it does require a key, reinstalling everything won't work and I will need to call Toshiba to complain more.


    In your case, yes.

    There is OEM Software (usually installed at the factory) that has an OEM SLP product key already entered.  When Windows sees the OEM SLP key, it checks the computer's Bios for the Proper OEM Bios flag.  If the proper flag is found, Windows will self-activate.

    OEM Bios Flags are specific to the Manufacturer And to the version of Windows it is good for.  That means an OEM Bios Flag for Vista (which your computer originally came with) would not be the proper OEM Bios Flag for Windows 7.

    So, either they need to provide you a Windows 7 Product Key or they need to help you flash the computer's Bios with a Bios that containes the Proper OEM Bios Flag for that version of Windows 7 and the Windows 7 OEM SLP key so windows will self-activate. Either way, it's on them to help you fix the issue.

     


    Darin MS
    Thursday, July 22, 2010 7:08 PM
  • In your case, yes.

    There is OEM Software (usually installed at the factory) that has an OEM SLP product key already entered.  When Windows sees the OEM SLP key, it checks the computer's Bios for the Proper OEM Bios flag.  If the proper flag is found, Windows will self-activate.

    OEM Bios Flags are specific to the Manufacturer And to the version of Windows it is good for.  That means an OEM Bios Flag for Vista (which your computer originally came with) would not be the proper OEM Bios Flag for Windows 7.

    So, either they need to provide you a Windows 7 Product Key or they need to help you flash the computer's Bios with a Bios that containes the Proper OEM Bios Flag for that version of Windows 7 and the Windows 7 OEM SLP key so windows will self-activate. Either way, it's on them to help you fix the issue.

     


    Darin MS


    Excellent help. Thanks again, I will direct them to this thread.  I have already posted on their forums but have yet to receive a response.  Is there some place I can rate the service here? :)

     

    Thursday, July 22, 2010 8:27 PM
  • Excellent help. Thanks again, I will direct them to this thread.  I have already posted on their forums but have yet to receive a response.  Is there some place I can rate the service here? :)

    Aside from the "Vote as Helpful" button, unfortunatly, no there isn't.

    However, I will share this thread with people that may find your feedback useful.

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    Friday, July 23, 2010 8:53 PM
  • Hello again.  Just a quick question about the report I posted above.

    It shows Windows Product Key: *****-*****-74XYM-BH4JX-XM76F

    Are those the actual last 3 segments of my product key? Because they do not match the product key on the bottom of the laptop.

    I just tried to reinstall Windows Vista using the key on the bottom of the laptop and it says it's an invalid key, so now I'm thinking someone entered a Retail key because the laptop one didn't work.

    Maybe I could PM the key to someone and they could tell me what's going on?

    Saturday, July 31, 2010 3:01 AM
  • "Mason7" wrote in message news:c96ccb7c-f05e-4c0d-97e7-9459fb457d27...

    Hello again.  Just a quick question about the report I posted above.

    It shows Windows Product Key: *****-*****-74XYM-BH4JX-XM76F

    Are those the actual last 3 segments of my product key? Because they do not match the product key on the bottom of the laptop.

    I just tried to reinstall Windows Vista using the key on the bottom of the laptop and it says it's an invalid key, so now I'm thinking someone entered a Retail key because the laptop one didn't work.

    Maybe I could PM the key to someone and they could tell me what's going on?

    With what media did you reinstall Vista? If you used the Recovery disks (or the Recovery partition) then you should not have needed the key at all, as the Recovery system will include its own OEM SLP Key which should be valid for the machines on which it is designed to be used. If you used a Retail disk, then the failure is to be expected, as you can't usually use an OEM Key on a Retail install. Please run a new MGADiag report, and post the results.
     
    The Key you are quoting here (from your first post, with Win 7 installed) is a Keyless Install Key for Windows 7 - which would never be the same as the COA Key for Vista on the base of your machine.
     

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    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Saturday, July 31, 2010 8:10 AM
    Moderator
  • With what media did you reinstall Vista? If you used the Recovery disks (or the Recovery partition) then you should not have needed the key at all, as the Recovery system will include its own OEM SLP Key which should be valid for the machines on which it is designed to be used. If you used a Retail disk, then the failure is to be expected, as you can't usually use an OEM Key on a Retail install. Please run a new MGADiag report, and post the results.
     
    The Key you are quoting here (from your first post, with Win 7 installed) is a Keyless Install Key for Windows 7 - which would never be the same as the COA Key for Vista on the base of your machine.
     

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    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Since it told me the Vista key was invalid, I did not install it, so the laptop still has the same "not genuine" Win7 (so no new MGADiag results to post).

    It was a disc labeled Windows Vista Repair, and I booted up on that disc, hit "install now" instead of Repair and it asked for a key right away.

    Thanks for the clarification on the key.  I think I'll be sending the laptop back to Toshiba and let them mess with it.  It has 27 days left of warranty and now has a hardware problem (NIC not functional) that needs fixing as well.

    Saturday, July 31, 2010 8:22 AM
  • Youch!!

    At least you discovered the hardware problem in time - although it's debatable whether anyone could hold fast to the strict warranty terms under some legal systems (in the UK, it could be argued that you are entitled yto expect that a machine such as a laptop would be expected to work for more than 12 months and x days).

    I would recommend that you *demand* that the system come back with WIn 7 installed and valid, since you bought the machine with that expectation. Once you get the machine back - acquire the Key in use using Belarc Advisor, and file it for future reference, and also create the recovery disks.

     

    Good Luck - from the spunds of it, you may need it.


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Saturday, July 31, 2010 5:58 PM
    Moderator