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Windows 7 Is Not Genuine Anymore??? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Today I suddenly recieved the "Windows 7 /// Build 7600 /// This copy of Windows is not genuine" at the bottom right of my screen, screen is now black, etc. Not sure how this could happen... Only thing of signifigance I did today was wipe my display drivers as I just installed a new video card. Here is the diagnostics.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: N/A, hr = 0xc004f012
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-TC9B4-8DYW4-TT7J8
    Windows Product Key Hash: 0gUZqhvTU/do1dhJvOLRTASWgmA=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-112-4166335-85859
    Windows Product ID Type: 5
    Windows License Type: Retail
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003
    ID: {024DF848-41C0-4BD1-AE5C-E063AEA1FCF4}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000000
    Build lab: 7600.win7_gdr.100226-1909
    TTS Error: T:20100811224850483-
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: 77F760FE-153-80070002_7E90FEE8-175-80070002_025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{024DF848-41C0-4BD1-AE5C-E063AEA1FCF4}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-TT7J8</PKey><PID>00359-112-4166335-85859</PID><PIDType>5</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-2762514395-1855553145-1729235475</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>System manufacturer</Manufacturer><Model>System Product Name</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Phoenix Technologies, LTD</Manufacturer><Version>ASUS M2N32-SLI DELUXE ACPI BIOS Revision 1903</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20080401000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>D5B93607018400F6</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Mountain Standard Time(GMT-07:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 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

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7600.16385
    Error: product key not found.

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: 0x00000000
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000
    Event Time Stamp: 5:26:2010 15:03
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: MAAAAAEAAwABAAEAAAACAAAAAQABAAEA6GFUAFjEBnuSAKw7TuLYYqQ31V839ybp

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table
    Windows marker version: N/A
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: N/A
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name OEMID Value OEMTableID Value
      APIC   Nvidia  ASUSACPI
      FACP   Nvidia  ASUSACPI
      HPET   Nvidia  ASUSACPI
      MCFG   Nvidia  ASUSACPI

     

    Hope this is enough, and thanks in advance.

    Thursday, August 12, 2010 5:50 AM

Answers

  • Hello Rungreek1,

    "TTS Error: T:20100811224850483-"

     Your Diagnostic Report is telling me that your Windows is suffering from a Trusted Store Tamper.  (This type of issue seems to be rare in Windows 7 as I have seen this a few times).   In Windows, there are files that have, what is known as, a Digital Signature. A Digital Signature is an industry standard that ensures that a file is, in fact, from the specified source. If a file is modified, in any way, the Diagital Signature is broken. 

    Example: lets say you get a Printer Driver that is Digitally Signed from HP. Since the Digital Signature was created by a Trusted Source (HP) a Certificate is created within Window's Trusted Store. The Digital Signature is dependent on the file's Hash (think fingerprint) so if the file is changed in any way, it's Digital Signature is broken and becomes invalid.  So lets say that the HP Driver got modified by some sort of Malware. The File's Hash would no longer match the hash listed in the Digitally Signature (or the Signature may not even be readable at that point). The Digital Signature become invalid because windows now don't know what has been done to that file, so the file can no longer be trusted. This in turn invalidates the corresponding Certificate within the Trusted Store.

      What I have described in the above example is basically what is happening with your Windows 7.  Some Digitally Signed file has been modified in some way (replaced, rewritten or just become corrupt) and the Certificate within Windows's Trusted Store has become invalid (i.e. no longer trusted) and that is what has triggered the Non-Genuine messaging.

      Unfortunatly, none of my tools are able to pinpoint which file/signature/certificate is causing the problem. However there are a few thing you can try that may correct the issue.


      1) First off not all Digitally Signed files are Drivers, but from experience we have found that this issue seems to occure the most with Drivers.  So my first suggestion is to confirm that all your hardware drivers are up to date. Note: Figuring out id a Driver is up to date and/or replacing a driver with a more current one can sometimes take semi-advanced computer knowledge and me explaining the process is outside the scope of this forum. If you do not know how to work with Drivers seak assistance or skip down to #2 or #3 below

      2) Restore Windows back to a past System Restore Point.

    1) Boot into Windows
    2) Click the ‘Start’ button
    3) In the Start Search field, type: System Restore and hit “Enter” keyboard key
    4) Select "Choose Different Restore Point", Put a check in the box that says "Show restore points older than 5 days", select the restore point that corresponds to a date Before you first noticed the issue.
    5) Click the "Next" button.
    6) Reboot

      3) Repair Windows using the 'sfc /scannow' command

    The Scan Now will look for any bad Windows files and attempt to repair them, if possible (it isn't always able to)

    1) Login to Windows
    2) Click the Start button
    3) Type: cmd.exe in the search field
    4) Right-click the cmd.exe file and select Run as Administrator
    5) In the CMD window, type: sfc /scannow
    6) Reboot and see if that resolves the issue.

    If none of my suggestions resolves the issue, then the only other thing I can suggest is to either create a (no cost) support request at http://support.microsoft.com/gp/contactwga or reinstall Windows.

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, August 12, 2010 6:25 PM
    Thursday, August 12, 2010 6:25 PM

All replies

  • Please review How to Update Your Product Key in Windows 7 and re-enter your Windows 7 Home Premium product key.
    Carey Frisch
    Thursday, August 12, 2010 6:34 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Carey. Thanks for the quick reply. When I follow those steps, there is no option to "Change Product Key" at the bottom of the dialog box, Where it looks like it should be it reads:

     

    Windows Activation -----------------------------------------

         Status not available

         Product ID: Not Available

     

    Any ideas? I bought this copy of windows at a local Office Max, I am sure it is genuine.

    ***Edit: Just to clear it up, when I do enter my Product key when prompted at startup, it checks it and states it doesn't pass, is not genuine.

    Thursday, August 12, 2010 4:06 PM
  • Hello Rungreek1,

    "TTS Error: T:20100811224850483-"

     Your Diagnostic Report is telling me that your Windows is suffering from a Trusted Store Tamper.  (This type of issue seems to be rare in Windows 7 as I have seen this a few times).   In Windows, there are files that have, what is known as, a Digital Signature. A Digital Signature is an industry standard that ensures that a file is, in fact, from the specified source. If a file is modified, in any way, the Diagital Signature is broken. 

    Example: lets say you get a Printer Driver that is Digitally Signed from HP. Since the Digital Signature was created by a Trusted Source (HP) a Certificate is created within Window's Trusted Store. The Digital Signature is dependent on the file's Hash (think fingerprint) so if the file is changed in any way, it's Digital Signature is broken and becomes invalid.  So lets say that the HP Driver got modified by some sort of Malware. The File's Hash would no longer match the hash listed in the Digitally Signature (or the Signature may not even be readable at that point). The Digital Signature become invalid because windows now don't know what has been done to that file, so the file can no longer be trusted. This in turn invalidates the corresponding Certificate within the Trusted Store.

      What I have described in the above example is basically what is happening with your Windows 7.  Some Digitally Signed file has been modified in some way (replaced, rewritten or just become corrupt) and the Certificate within Windows's Trusted Store has become invalid (i.e. no longer trusted) and that is what has triggered the Non-Genuine messaging.

      Unfortunatly, none of my tools are able to pinpoint which file/signature/certificate is causing the problem. However there are a few thing you can try that may correct the issue.


      1) First off not all Digitally Signed files are Drivers, but from experience we have found that this issue seems to occure the most with Drivers.  So my first suggestion is to confirm that all your hardware drivers are up to date. Note: Figuring out id a Driver is up to date and/or replacing a driver with a more current one can sometimes take semi-advanced computer knowledge and me explaining the process is outside the scope of this forum. If you do not know how to work with Drivers seak assistance or skip down to #2 or #3 below

      2) Restore Windows back to a past System Restore Point.

    1) Boot into Windows
    2) Click the ‘Start’ button
    3) In the Start Search field, type: System Restore and hit “Enter” keyboard key
    4) Select "Choose Different Restore Point", Put a check in the box that says "Show restore points older than 5 days", select the restore point that corresponds to a date Before you first noticed the issue.
    5) Click the "Next" button.
    6) Reboot

      3) Repair Windows using the 'sfc /scannow' command

    The Scan Now will look for any bad Windows files and attempt to repair them, if possible (it isn't always able to)

    1) Login to Windows
    2) Click the Start button
    3) Type: cmd.exe in the search field
    4) Right-click the cmd.exe file and select Run as Administrator
    5) In the CMD window, type: sfc /scannow
    6) Reboot and see if that resolves the issue.

    If none of my suggestions resolves the issue, then the only other thing I can suggest is to either create a (no cost) support request at http://support.microsoft.com/gp/contactwga or reinstall Windows.

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Thursday, August 12, 2010 6:25 PM
    Thursday, August 12, 2010 6:25 PM