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OEM XP Pro fails WGA RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a OEM XP Pro in shrink wrap newly installed with COA sticker and all. It fails WGA. Below is the output from the diagnostic tool.

    What do I do to solve this? Thanks.



    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0006.1):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Invalid Product Key
    Validation Code: 8
    Online Validation Code: N/A
    Cached Validation Code: N/A
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-TJ7C3-MCGFK-XH9YY
    Windows Product Key Hash: wgOc1L100YRri/8MOv4t2GGpV8o=
    Windows Product ID: 55274-640-0147603-23214
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro
    ID: {1878C4F6-7B8F-4F8E-866D-B6AD9B9C904D}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    WGA Version: Registered, 1.9.40.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Product Name: N/A
    Architecture: N/A
    Build lab: N/A
    TTS Error: N/A
    Validation Diagnostic: 025D1FF3-230-1
    Resolution Status: N/A

    WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A
    Version: N/A

    WGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: 8
    File Exists: Yes
    Version: 1.9.40.0
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WGATray.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: Registered, 1.7.111.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-230-1

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\IEXPLORE.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{1878C4F6-7B8F-4F8E-866D-B6AD9B9C904D}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0006.1</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-XH9YY</PKey><PID>55274-640-0147603-23214</PID><PIDType>1</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-343818398-1035525444-839522115</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>MICRO-STAR INTERNATIONAL CO., LTD</Manufacturer><Model>MS-7211</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Phoenix Technologies, LTD</Manufacturer><Version>6.00 PG</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="3"/><Date>20051020000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>E60534F70184225D</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Central Standard Time(GMT-06:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification><File Name="WgaTray.exe" Version="1.9.40.0"/><File Name="WgaLogon.dll" Version="1.9.40.0"/></GANotification></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Licensing Data-->
    N/A

    HWID Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    BIOS string matches: no
    Marker string from BIOS: N/A
    Marker string from OEMBIOS.DAT: N/A, hr = 0x80004005

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    N/A

    Saturday, June 20, 2009 9:27 PM

Answers

  • Contact the seller of the software and demand a refund.  You do not have an OEM version of Windows XP.  It is a counterfeit "volume license" copy with a counterfeit product key.
    Carey Frisch
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 2:08 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Contact the seller of the software and demand a refund.  You do not have an OEM version of Windows XP.  It is a counterfeit "volume license" copy with a counterfeit product key.
    Carey Frisch
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 2:08 PM
    Moderator
  • With all due respect, I don't believe this is correct. I don't just have a product key.

    It has a sticker with the holes in it and all the authenticity writing. It is pure microsoft. And the disk has all the shiny holographs.

    So what do I do?
    Sunday, June 21, 2009 4:45 PM
  • Contact the seller of the software and demand a refund.  You do not have an OEM version of Windows XP.  It is a counterfeit "volume license" copy with a counterfeit product key.

    From your MGA report:

    Windows License Type: Volume

    Validation Status: Invalid Product Key

    Carey Frisch
    Monday, June 22, 2009 2:39 AM
    Moderator
  • Sigh. I guess the answer is: "Because I Said So."

    This *is* an OEM copy of Windows. Would you like me to send you a picture of it. How about the very authentic disk and sticker?

    That answer "Invalid Product Key" is wrong.
    Monday, June 22, 2009 2:44 AM
  • The truth is in the MGA report and not the "authentic-looking CD" you have.  Please see:
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/default.aspx
    Carey Frisch
    Monday, June 22, 2009 2:48 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Big Creek,


    No, the "Invalid Product Key" is correct as well as the line "Windows License Type: Volume".

    Only Large Orginization (University, Large Company, Government agency...so on) are able to purchase Volume Licenses.

    In addition to Carey's post, I also encourage you to submit a Piracy Report at http://microsoft.com/piracy regarding the Person or Company that sold you this software.

    Thank you,
    Darin MS
    Monday, June 22, 2009 4:32 PM
  • I find it comical that no-one is even willing to consider the possibility that the key could be valid - without even seeing the key. It's not as if MS' WGA code has never had bugs.

    Nevertheless I shall slavishly bow to authority ...

    I bought this copy about 9 months ago to keep in stock. I don't remember for a certainty which vendor I purchased it from. It appears MS isn't willing to hear from you unless you are planning to rat on someone. I don't want to falsely accuse a vendor who may not deserve it. Is there any recourse?
    Monday, June 22, 2009 5:51 PM
  • The Windows XP CD you used installed a Volume License version.  The product key has nothing to do with this.  If you had a genuine OEM copy, the line in the MGA report would indicate Windows License Type: OEM and not Windows License Type: Volume.

    As far as any recourse action, that would be between you and the seller.  In order to correct your unfortunate non-genuine licensing issue, visit
    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/default.aspx and click on Validate Windows.  When validation fails, you'll see a link to purchase a WGA Kit.

    Carey Frisch
    Monday, June 22, 2009 6:41 PM
    Moderator
  • The Windows XP CD you used installed a Volume License version.  The product key has nothing to do with this.  If you had a genuine OEM copy, the line in the MGA report would indicate Windows License Type: OEM and not Windows License Type: Volume .

    As far as any recourse action, that would be between you and the seller.  In order to correct your unfortunate non-genuine licensing issue, visit
    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/default.aspx and click on Validate Windows .  When validation fails, you'll see a link to purchase a WGA Kit .

    Carey Frisch

    One again, you're unable/unwilling to even ponder the possibility that the dumb software tool could be wrong.

    The "purchase a WGA kit" (I've been there several times the last couple of days) merely offers to sell me a copy of XP at a price higher than retail. Why on earth would anyone want to do that? Are there people who actually take that option?

    Thanks for the replies. It's obvious that this is the Microsoft-is-always-right-and-never-has-made-a-mistake forum. I'm pretty sure I don't belong here. Thanks, anyway.
    Monday, June 22, 2009 7:02 PM
  • In over three years, I have yet to witness the MGA tool to report incorrect information.  Thousands of Windows users have taken advantage of the generous WGA Kit offer to correct a non-genuine Windows licencing issue.  One cannot generally buy a "Genuine Full Retail" version of Windows XP Professional for the price Microsoft is offering.  Maybe a genuine OEM version, but not a full retail version.

    Feel free to file a confidential Suspected Piracy Report: http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/reports/report.aspx
    Carey Frisch
    Monday, June 22, 2009 9:39 PM
    Moderator
  • In over three years, I have yet to witness the MGA tool to report incorrect information.  Thousands of Windows users have taken advantage of the generous WGA Kit offer to correct a non-genuine Windows licencing issue.  One cannot generally buy a "Genuine Full Retail" version of Windows XP Professional for the price Microsoft is offering.  Maybe a genuine OEM version, but not a full retail version.

    Feel free to file a confidential Suspected Piracy Report : http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/reports/report.aspx
    Carey Frisch

    Well, of course you haven't seen it be wrong. You send everyone packing based on nothing other than what the tool itself reported. (I don't think the tool is likely to say "I could be wrong about this, but ...". So if it ever was wrong, how would you know? It's never wrong because it's right by definition.

    Microsoft's offer isn't generous. I don't have, need, or want a "Genuine Full Retail" version. I want the OEM copy I have to work. So Microsoft is offering me something I don't want at a price no-one would pay. And they want me to do the legwork of tracking down the supposed counterfeiter in return for this. If they'd offer me a similarly discounted OEM copy I might bite.

    BTW, I've looked through the gallery of "high-grade counterfeits" and I still don't see anything to indicate it is not genuine.
    Monday, June 22, 2009 11:29 PM
  • The problen is you do not have an OEM copy of of Windows XP Professional.  You have a counterfeit copy of a "Volume License" copy with an illegally-generated key-gen product key.  As i mentioned before, take up your issue with the seller.  If they won't deal with you, file a piracy report so others don't suffer the same issue. You can contact Microsoft directly if you wish to further pursue the issue: http://support.microsoft.com/gp/contactwga
    Carey Frisch
    Tuesday, June 23, 2009 2:07 AM
    Moderator
  • The problen is you do not have an OEM copy of of Windows XP Professional .  You have a counterfeit copy of a "Volume License " copy with an illegally-generated key-gen product key.  As i mentioned before, take up your issue with the seller.
    Yes, you have indeed mentioned that. And if you KEEP YELLING IT LOUD ENOUGH AND LONG ENOUGH maybe it will somehow become true.

    In the meantime I promise to waste no more of your time as clearly this forum is not for people who think MS might someday make a mistake. Thank you.
    Tuesday, June 23, 2009 2:16 AM
  • Complimentary offer: Microsoft will make a complimentary copy of Windows XP available to customers who have been sold counterfeit Windows. Customers will be required to submit a proof of purchase, the counterfeit CD, and a counterfeit report with details of their purchase. Only high-quality counterfeit Windows will qualify for the complimentary offer.
    Carey Frisch
    Tuesday, June 23, 2009 12:25 PM
    Moderator
  • Complimentary offer: Microsoft will make a complimentary copy of Windows XP available to customers who have been sold counterfeit Windows. Customers will be required to submit a proof of purchase, the counterfeit CD, and a counterfeit report with details of their purchase. Only high-quality counterfeit Windows will qualify for the complimentary offer.
    Thanks. Yes. I've seen that. But as I cannot be certain where I bought this copy, I do not believe I could qualify.
    Tuesday, June 23, 2009 1:15 PM
  • Hello Big Creek,

    Here  are two BIG indicators of counterfeit software that you can check for yourself:

    1.   Look very closely at the CD itself.  Is the hologram a very thin label affixed to the top surface of the CD or is it embedded within the plastic layers of the CD?  A hologram that is a label is a major indicator of a counterfeit CD.


    2.  If an OEM CD, in the upper left quadrant it will have "For distribution only with a new PC" in the hologram.  Now insert the CD into a computer and navigate to the \386 folder, and look for a file called setupp.ini.  This is a small text file.  Open it for viewing in Notepad.  The file has two sections, look at the second section.  It should look a lot like this:

    [Pid]
    ExtraData=786F687170637175716954806365EF
    Pid=76487OEM

    My expectation is that yours will have a Pid=value that does not have OEM as the last three, but will have either "270" or will have a value between 640 and 649.  A purported "OEM" CD with a setupp.ini file with those values, which are Volume Licensing values, rather than "OEM" as the value, is another major indicator of a counterfeit CD.


    The reason why the counterfeits look so "good" is that they were being manufactured in the same factory as the real Microsoft products were being manufactured.  http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2007/jul07/07-24CounterfeitingSyndicatePR.mspx


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, June 23, 2009 3:29 PM
  • Hello Big Creek,

    Here  are two BIG indicators of counterfeit software that you can check for yourself:

    1.   Look very closely at the CD itself.  Is the hologram a very thin label affixed to the top surface of the CD or is it embedded within the plastic layers of the CD?  A hologram that is a label is a major indicator of a counterfeit CD.


    2.  If an OEM CD, in the upper left quadrant it will have "For distribution only with a new PC" in the hologram.  Now insert the CD into a computer and navigate to the \386 folder, and look for a file called setupp.ini.  This is a small text file.  Open it for viewing in Notepad.  The file has two sections, look at the second section.  It should look a lot like this:

    [Pid]
    ExtraData=786F687170637175716954806365EF
    Pid=76487OEM

    My expectation is that yours will have a Pid=value that does not have OEM as the last three, but will have either "270" or will have a value between 640 and 649.  A purported "OEM" CD with a setupp.ini file with those values, which are Volume Licensing values, rather than "OEM" as the value, is another major indicator of a counterfeit CD.


    The reason why the counterfeits look so "good" is that they were being manufactured in the same factory as the real Microsoft products were being manufactured.  http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2007/jul07/07-24CounterfeitingSyndicatePR.mspx


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    The hologram appears to be part of the plastic. At least there is no discernible edge that can be felt with a fingernail.

    The pid does end in 270. A random OEM CD I checked has OEM at the end.
    Tuesday, June 23, 2009 4:31 PM
  • Hello Big Creek,

    With the PID value being 270, I think it's an open-and-shut case that you inadvertently acquired a hi-quality counterfeit licensing kit from one of your vendors.

    Of course, only the Microsoft-approved crypto lab (where you would send the materials to be evaluated for the complimentary Windows offer) is authorized to officially proclaim the materials as such, and send you a free full retail copy, but based on what I have learned in this forum, you do have the HQ materials to qualify.

    Here's an extract from the FAQ:
    ****************************

    Requirements and limitations of the genuine Windows offer

    Q:

    Who can participate in the genuine Windows offer?

    A:

    The offer is open to any person who purchased Microsoft Windows XP (Professional or Home Edition) or Windows XP Operating System pre-installed on a new computer. Windows XP upgrade purchases and purchases made under volume license agreements are not eligible.

    Q:

    Can genuine Windows XP customers participate in the genuine Windows offer as well?

    A:

    No. Only users of counterfeit Windows XP are eligible for the genuine Windows offer.

    Q:

    Will people who participate in the genuine Windows offer face repercussions for having illegal software?

    A:

    Microsoft will not bring legal action against the people who participate in the genuine Windows offer.

    Q:

    What can I use for proof of purchase?

    A:

    Because purchase documentation varies widely, we are flexible. Proof of purchase can be a purchase order, the original supplier invoice, or some other store receipt. The proof of purchase must show the supplier’s name and address, the date of purchase, and a reference to Windows.

    Q:

    What must I provide on the counterfeit report?

    A:

    The counterfeit report helps Microsoft identify the reseller and type of counterfeit software transaction that took place. The information that is required on the report is:

    • Was the copy of Windows preinstalled?
    • Where was it purchased (Web, street vendor, store, etc)?
    • What was the reseller’s name?
    • Did you receive a CD and a Certificate of Authenticity (COA)?
    • How much did you pay?
    • What was the date of purchase?

    You must also provide your shipping address so Microsoft can send you a Windows Genuine Advantage Kit for Windows XP CD.

     

    Q:

    Why does Microsoft need this information?

    A:

    Microsoft is collecting information on counterfeit sellers to get information on illegal practices and to work with authorities to enforce anti-piracy policies and laws. The counterfeit report will be treated by Microsoft as confidential. Microsoft devotes substantial time and energy to fighting software counterfeiting, and you can be assured that we will take appropriate action in response to your report.

    Q:

    Will Microsoft return the counterfeit software I submit?

    A:

    Microsoft cannot return the documentation you submit, including the counterfeit software.

    ****************************


    Now the ball is in your court. :-) 


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, June 23, 2009 4:44 PM