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Reinstalling an OEM xp installation without the cd key. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I recieved a computer from a friend with an xp installation that was full of viruses and other stuff so bad that I could not get any software to run on it even to remove the viruses. Normally I would just take the master recovery disc, but the former owner had lost it. I could not get that key. So I decided to try installing with another copy of xp.  I recovered the key for the old xp installation off of the old machine, wrote it down, then formatted the harddrive and installed xp from the discs that are part of my other computer. It does not authenticate properly. Is what I did against the law stuff you guys have on the liscence, or can we get it to work?

     

    Thanks,

    W. Stilwell

    Thursday, May 31, 2007 2:51 AM

Answers

  • W_Stilwell,

     

    I would recommend reading the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) for all the legal explaination.  Maybe what happened is the key used originally wasn't genuine and this may be why you are experiencing problems. You may be able to contact the original manufacturer  of the system and explain the situation. In turn you may be able to purchase the orginal recovery software.

     

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    OGA and WGA Forum Manager

    Friday, June 1, 2007 10:07 PM
  • W_Stillwell,

     

    Please follow these steps for assistance:

    Step 1 is to run the utility at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012, then click the Windows tab, click the "Copy" button, then paste the report into a response in this thread.

    Step 2 is to look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer or with your retail purchase of  Windows to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticity (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another version of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    Saturday, June 2, 2007 1:48 AM
  • Well thanks for the help guys, but I am just gonna install my old copy of Win2K on it, that will keep it running until I can save up enough money to upgrade and get Vista. If you still have time to answer a question, if I buy the OEM version of Vista, is the licensing agreement different?
    Saturday, June 9, 2007 4:31 PM
  • W_Stillwell,

     

    The basic concepts of Windows Operating Systems licensing for consumers has not changed with Vista.

     

    1.  The Vista OEM license is permanently tied to the computer onto which it is first installed and it is not permitted by the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) to be moved to any other computer.

     

    2.  Customers with Vista OEM installations get their support for the Operating System from the OEM and not from Microsoft.

    Monday, June 11, 2007 12:55 AM

All replies

  • W_Stilwell,

     

    I would recommend reading the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) for all the legal explaination.  Maybe what happened is the key used originally wasn't genuine and this may be why you are experiencing problems. You may be able to contact the original manufacturer  of the system and explain the situation. In turn you may be able to purchase the orginal recovery software.

     

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    OGA and WGA Forum Manager

    Friday, June 1, 2007 10:07 PM
  • W_Stillwell,

     

    Please follow these steps for assistance:

    Step 1 is to run the utility at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012, then click the Windows tab, click the "Copy" button, then paste the report into a response in this thread.

    Step 2 is to look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer or with your retail purchase of  Windows to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticity (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another version of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    Saturday, June 2, 2007 1:48 AM
  • Well thanks for the help guys, but I am just gonna install my old copy of Win2K on it, that will keep it running until I can save up enough money to upgrade and get Vista. If you still have time to answer a question, if I buy the OEM version of Vista, is the licensing agreement different?
    Saturday, June 9, 2007 4:31 PM
  • W_Stillwell,

     

    The basic concepts of Windows Operating Systems licensing for consumers has not changed with Vista.

     

    1.  The Vista OEM license is permanently tied to the computer onto which it is first installed and it is not permitted by the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) to be moved to any other computer.

     

    2.  Customers with Vista OEM installations get their support for the Operating System from the OEM and not from Microsoft.

    Monday, June 11, 2007 12:55 AM