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Create a Restore Point? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Probably a dumb question, but is it possible to create a Restore Point in WHS?
    Sunday, May 10, 2009 7:03 AM

Answers

  • This is unsupported, but here's a tutorial
    http://wiki.wegotserved.com/index.php?title=System_Restore
    • Marked as answer by swales101 Tuesday, May 12, 2009 5:36 AM
    Monday, May 11, 2009 11:00 PM

All replies

  • Probably a dumb question, but is it possible to create a Restore Point in WHS?

    As in Windows Server 2003, it is not possible to create a Restore Point in Windows Home Server.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Sunday, May 10, 2009 8:07 PM
    Moderator
  • This is unsupported, but here's a tutorial
    http://wiki.wegotserved.com/index.php?title=System_Restore
    • Marked as answer by swales101 Tuesday, May 12, 2009 5:36 AM
    Monday, May 11, 2009 11:00 PM
  • Thanks Olaf - I didn't think it had the functionality but it was worth asking the question.

    Best regards

    Clive
    Tuesday, May 12, 2009 3:06 AM
  • This looks great and I'll give it a go.  Many thanks for the pointer.
    Tuesday, May 12, 2009 5:20 AM
  • Please be aware, if you try it, that you are taking a significant risk; Windows Home Server was designed to function in an environment which doesn't include system restore, and Drive Extender is likely to have some serious issues if you accidentally include a folder that it has control of in your system restore points.

    In addition, you're violating the Windows XP EULA, because Windows XP is the source of the files used to implement system restore and it requires reverse engineering to extract those files. And you're violating the Windows Home Server EULA, because it requires reverse engineering to insert the additional capability into the base operating system. (I doubt that Microsoft is going to hunt you down for this, however...)

    So be careful, and test extensively before you put a server modified in this fashion into production. And be aware that should you have problems in the future, server reinstallation is the most-recommended solution for server problems, so you will lose this work and have to go through the whole thing again if you reach the point where reinstallation is needed.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, May 12, 2009 3:52 PM
    Moderator
  • On top dont forget, that system restore would need a serious amount of disk space to be used senseful, which is not really given on the 20 GB system volume of WHS.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Tuesday, May 12, 2009 7:10 PM
    Moderator
  • Ken - First of all, I have long valued all the advice you give on these forums. I rarely post but I read a lot of the advice you give so thanks for all that. Now onto my question. I too would like to have the restore point functionality on my WHS because I want the option to Restore Previous Versions of files on my server. Arent restore points the best (most disk-conserving) way to do this? I dont want to save a ton of backups (Id prefer to just have one backup...) but I want to have my cake and eat it too when it comes to accessing older file versions when I may have screwed up something in a particular file (versus wanting to roll back my entire computer...)

    thanks
    jane
    Thursday, October 29, 2009 2:20 AM
  • Previous Versions functionality and system restore points are unrelated. Having one will not automatically give you the other.

    In any case, Previous Versions on Windows Home Server is buggy and unreliable; I recommend you not even bother with it. If you insist, you can consult this thread. But please bear in mind that it's not really a question of if Previous Versions will let you down on Windows Home Server, it's probably more a question of when.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, October 29, 2009 3:12 PM
    Moderator
  • Windows Home Server was designed to function in an environment which doesn't include system restore. . . .  So be careful, and test extensively before you put a server modified in this fashion into production.

    Ken,

    Though I value your - and others who post here - opinions and advice, there are two beefs I'd like to get off of my chest about WHS, and this thread is a significant example.

    • Every time I get on virtually ANY thread that talks about WHS of any flavor, the answer postings are replete with "server" based terminology and concepts, such as ". . . putting the server into production."
      Yes, I know that WHS is a stripped down version of Server '03 or '08, depending on the flavor, but (IMHO) the user experience emphasis is in the wrong place.  As it is now, the emphasis is "Windows Home SERVER", whereas I believe that the emphasis should be "Windows HOME Server".

      Again (IMHO), 99.999% of the people that Microsoft is marketing the Windows Home Server box toward are not true sysadmins, but are home users who want to include some media streaming, a NAS box, or like the idea of some kind of automagic backup on their network - and who look askance at the other non-Windows NAS offerings.  They are most familiar with the various Windows desktop editions and the features and capabilities available there.  Placing the home user smack-dab into the middle of a true "server" environment, with all the gotcha's available there, is a recipe for disaster.

      Now, if the intent of WHS is really to create an "Extremely Small Business Server" for those businesses who need (or want) a server but cannot afford the licensing associated with SBS, but know someone who knows their way around servers - then you are doing the right thing, and you should market it as such.  But even in this scenario, the "Extremely Small Business" - and the help they enlist - is probably more familiar with the desktop environment than the complexities of a true server.

    • The absence of features like System Restore simply underlines the point I am making above.  People who are intelligent enough to want a "home server" are probably familiar with the best-practices of a home desktop environment - but are not familiar with these practices in a server environment.  IMHO, eliminating all the carefully learned tools and practices of the Windows Desktop environment is a disservice to the customer.

    I guess my point is this:  If Microsoft wants to create - and market - a true HOME server, they should make it as familiar to the HOME user as possible.

    What say ye?

    Jim (JR)


    Friday, June 29, 2012 7:29 AM