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VERY Slow File Deletes on Server RRS feed

  • Question

  • I tried posting this on the software forum, and received no useful help, so I am trying here.  The problem could be hardware/could be software (so, what else is new?!?)

    I've been running WHS on a small home network with the server, two desktops (one Win7, the other XP) and a Win7 laptop for several months.  Most things seem fine--all the hardware is gigabyte rated, and I can move large files between the server and the clients at close to 100MB/sec.  However, if I try anything that involves a delete on the server, things slow WAY down.  I just tried doing a copy/past between the server and the Win7 desktop.  I copied a folder off of the server that had 17 files in it totalling 543 KBs.  The copy was, for all intensive purposes, instantaneous.  However, I then tried a cut/past from the server, and it took an unbelievable 5 minutes 45 seconds and showed an transfer rate of about 1.5 KBs!!  Anytime I do an action that involves a delete on the server (e.g. save a small (50KB) changed Excel workbook on the server) it takes way too much time (10 seconds in the Excel example).  If, however, I do a cut and paste from the desktop to the server, it's blazingly fast.  The problem only seems to occur when I change or delete something on the server.

    The server is a Shuttle K45 box running a Celeron 440 @2 GHz, with two 1 Gig memory sticks and two WD 750 Gig green drives.  The integrated NIC is a generic Marvell Yukon 88E8056 chip.  I wouldn't be surprised if the problem has something to do with the NIC, as I seem to get conflicting stories on the appropriate driver.  However, I am currently using a Marvell supplied driver 11.24.3.3, dated 2/15/2010, which their website says is appriate for Windows Server 2003.  I have tried going back to the older driver which was supplied by Shuttle, but it was no help.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Ed

    Friday, March 26, 2010 6:12 PM

Answers

  • ...
    2.  Installed ESET NOD 32 antivirus on the server 
    ...
    there will be no apparent action for about an hour.  The system is not hung--I assume it's rebuilding indices or whatever.  Don't be attempted to abort the installation because you think it has stalled--I did, and it cost me another 3 hours!

    I'm betting the cause of your performance issue was item 2.

    As for the other, the length of time it takes to rebuild the storage pool varies depending on how many disks and how much data you have. Many terabytes could take days.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Sailwithed Thursday, April 1, 2010 3:03 AM
    Tuesday, March 30, 2010 9:20 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Isn't this exactly the same statement as before that "Office is slow, how do I speed it up" dressed up as a Windows Home Server question?

    I think if you can throw large files around on your network at 100MB/s and you have pings in the order of single digits milliseconds there isn't much you can do in Windows Home Server to speed up office applications other than look at your client PCs.

     


    --
    Friday, March 26, 2010 9:54 PM
  • Al,

    I completely disagree--5min 45 seconds to do a cut and paste of less than a megabyte on a gigabyte network??  My slowest client alone will do the c/p in a second or two.  And we know the network isn't slowing this down. While I think the problem is probably software, this is NOT an issue of the speed of Office.  Heck, the cut and paste is just using Explorer!

    Thanks anyway,

    Ed

    Friday, March 26, 2010 10:42 PM
  • Well, after going nuts for awhile, I decided to do a reinstall of WHS.  It took about 6 hours, but did solve the problem.  The 5 min 45 seconds to do a cut/paste of a half meg folder with 17 files went down to approximately 1 or 2 seconds.  I don't know what I had done to mess up the original install, but I did do the following to the following which MAY have messed things up:

    1.  Used Windows defrag, but ONLY on the C: drive (SYS)
    2.  Installed ESET NOD 32 antivirus on the server
    3.  Used CCleaner on the server

    If anyone thinks that any of these actions could have caused a WHS problem, please respond for the good of all of us.

    One piece of information for anyone doing a reinstall--everything seems to proceed similar to the original install, EXCEPT, very late in the process, when you are informed that the system is installing WHS, there will be no apparent action for about an hour.  The system is not hung--I assume it's rebuilding indices or whatever.  Don't be attempted to abort the installation because you think it has stalled--I did, and it cost me another 3 hours!

    Thanks,
    Ed

    Tuesday, March 30, 2010 7:48 PM
  • ...
    2.  Installed ESET NOD 32 antivirus on the server 
    ...
    there will be no apparent action for about an hour.  The system is not hung--I assume it's rebuilding indices or whatever.  Don't be attempted to abort the installation because you think it has stalled--I did, and it cost me another 3 hours!

    I'm betting the cause of your performance issue was item 2.

    As for the other, the length of time it takes to rebuild the storage pool varies depending on how many disks and how much data you have. Many terabytes could take days.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Sailwithed Thursday, April 1, 2010 3:03 AM
    Tuesday, March 30, 2010 9:20 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks, Ken.  I won't install ESET on the server.  Actually, I NEVER access the Internet from the server (except when it does to do Microsoft Update, etc.  Is there any reason to have an anti virus package on the server?

    Ed

    Thursday, April 1, 2010 3:04 AM
  • Do you need AV on your server? Opinions will differ on that; mine comes from a (brief and unpleasant) stint as a network security consultant.

    If you have complete control over every computing device that will ever be connected to your network at home, then probably you don't need AV software on your server. That is, of course, a pipe dream; I could list a dozen or more potential avenues of entry into your home network that most people would never consider. The obvious one is house guests (overnight or day visitors) who bring a laptop and want to connect to your network. Since you don't have 100% control of every device, you're best off with anti-malware protection on every device you can install it on. That would include your server.

    Personally I use Avast! for Windows Home Server; I also use Avast! on all my home computers, and I like the way it allows me to control updates, see scan status on connected computers, etc. F-Secure has a product for Windows Home Server as well, and there are a few others that claim compatibility (Bit Defender's free version, I think, and clamwin, though clamwin free doesn't have an on access scanner). No single tool is enough, though; every engine has it's weaknesses, so in addition to Avast! I run monthly scans on all home computers with an online free scanner from a different vendor.

    In the end, you pay your money (or not) and take your chances. :)


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, April 1, 2010 2:56 PM
    Moderator