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Verifying Port Forwarding failed RRS feed

  • Question

  • I can set-up the specific IP address and computer name in the router (d-link DIR-655) but don't know which UDP ports to open - can anyone advise the correct port numbers please?  Thanks
    Wednesday, December 2, 2009 6:15 PM

Answers

  • No UDP ports. TCP ports 80 (optional but recommended), 443, and 4125 must be forwarded for your remote access web site to work properly. If ports 80 and 443 are blocked by your ISP (fairly common in the US) there is no facility to move the remote access site built in to Windows Home Server, so you would have to do that by configuring IIS directly (unsupported). If port 4125 is blocked, you will not have access to the Console or remote desktop access to your client computers (running supported operating systems) through the remote access web site.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, December 2, 2009 6:25 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • No UDP ports. TCP ports 80 (optional but recommended), 443, and 4125 must be forwarded for your remote access web site to work properly. If ports 80 and 443 are blocked by your ISP (fairly common in the US) there is no facility to move the remote access site built in to Windows Home Server, so you would have to do that by configuring IIS directly (unsupported). If port 4125 is blocked, you will not have access to the Console or remote desktop access to your client computers (running supported operating systems) through the remote access web site.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, December 2, 2009 6:25 PM
    Moderator
  • I thought to check McAfee port settings to update and then re-visited the WHS console. The warning message has now disappeared. N.F.A.
    thanks. 
    Wednesday, December 2, 2009 8:23 PM
  • Hi there

    I advised no further action required however I do need further input please.

    The 3 ports advised to correctly access windows home server remotely @ homeserver.com are: 80,443,4125

    I opened ports 80, 443 on McAfee and needed to add 4125 as a new port. I then went to D-link/port forwarding and only added 4125 against the server IP address as I considered based on McAfee that port 4125 was the "missing ingredient". After I did this and re-booted the W.H.S. warning message on server (1) has duly disappeared.

    I then decided to do the identical procedure for server (2) however when I added port 4125 against the IP address and attempted to save I could not proceed as the port number was already assigned to server (1). If so is there an alternative port number to 4125, which I can input to the router to provide the same functionality?

    If I understand correctly, port 4125 appears to accept a connection from an IP address which is requesting connection but drops other connections and closes the port once the proxy connection is established hence the problem constantly migrates between the 2 servers. How long does the router hold the IP address against port 4125 before releasing? Would this be router specific or port specific - at least I would then know if the port was released after X minutes before accessing the other server remotely? Would port 3389 be of any use or is port 4125 the only port available for this WHS remote connection procedure? I'm currently stuck for a workable solution involving 2 servers. Thanks

    Friday, December 4, 2009 11:46 PM
  • ...
    How long does the router hold the IP address against port 4125 before releasing? Would this be router specific or port specific - at least I would then know if the port was released after X minutes before accessing the other server remotely? Would port 3389 be of any use or is port 4125 the only port available for this WHS remote connection procedure? I'm currently stuck for a workable solution involving 2 servers. Thanks
    Probably the issue is router specific in this case, but (as I said elsewhere) port 4125 is built into Windows Home Server and can't be changed.

    You could forward port 3389 to the other server (though it's not recommended or supported) if all you want is desktop and (through the desktop) console access to that server. From that server's desktop you could then manually "hop" to the desktop of any computer in your home/business that supports incoming remote desktop connections. But you don't need to do so, as you can also simply connect to one of the computers connected to your first server, then "hop" from that one instead.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, December 5, 2009 3:06 PM
    Moderator
  • ...
    How long does the router hold the IP address against port 4125 before releasing? Would this be router specific or port specific - at least I would then know if the port was released after X minutes before accessing the other server remotely? Would port 3389 be of any use or is port 4125 the only port available for this WHS remote connection procedure? I'm currently stuck for a workable solution involving 2 servers. Thanks
    Probably the issue is router specific in this case, but (as I said elsewhere) port 4125 is built into Windows Home Server and can't be changed.

    You could forward port 3389 to the other server (though it's not recommended or supported) if all you want is desktop and (through the desktop) console access to that server. From that server's desktop you could then manually "hop" to the desktop of any computer in your home/business that supports incoming remote desktop connections. But you don't need to do so, as you can also simply connect to one of the computers connected to your first server, then "hop" from that one instead.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    How does one "hop" from the WHS? I'd like to access another web server on the LAN, but port 80 is being used by WHS. Is there a way in WHS or IIS to redirect a URL (e.g. mywhshomeserver/anotherwebserver) to another machine on the LAN?

    Mark


    Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:40 PM
  • Use Remote Desktop to connect to computer A, then run the TS client on that computer to connect to computer B. If your home network is well-built, you might manage a third hop without too much lag, but why bother?

    As for redirection, no, not to a different machine. You would want a reverse proxy server for that.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, January 21, 2010 9:35 PM
    Moderator
  • Use Remote Desktop to connect to computer A, then run the TS client on that computer to connect to computer B. If your home network is well-built, you might manage a third hop without too much lag, but why bother?

    As for redirection, no, not to a different machine. You would want a reverse proxy server for that.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    To utilize a reverse proxy running on the WHS on port 80, I would have to change the IIS port to use something other than port 80. How does one change the default port number on WHS?

    Mark
    Thursday, January 21, 2010 10:23 PM
  • You don't put it on your server. A reverse proxy server is usually a separate machine.

    If your router supports it, you could purchase additional static IP addresses from your ISP (usually along with a business plan) and have the router forward one IP to server A, and the other to server B. Then point the DNS records for one domain to IP A, and the other to IP B.

    But all of this is rather off-topic here; we're talking about how to set up a business network now...
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, January 22, 2010 12:59 PM
    Moderator