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Windows XP Pro OEM will not authenticate - 4 other installs have RRS feed

  • Question

  • Please help, I purchased 5 OEM XPs, 4 have passed authentication, this one has not.

    I have formated and installed many times.

    Below is the the WGA data:

    Thank you very much for your assistance as I don't want to look bad regarding this problem and want to keep my job.

    Sincerely,
    Enrico


    Diagnostic Report (1.5.0540.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Genuine Validation Status: Invalid Product Key
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-GHM73-CD9MX-7W8V3
    Windows Product Key Hash: Vg3BM5FKUlUml3WsJ8wnpajGKZI=
    Windows Product ID: 55274-640-0233974-23781
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro
    Download Center code: Expired code.
    ID: {B4E1DB12-7C78-4E00-A72C-C3EE21BC2097}
    Is Admin: Yes
    AutoDial:
    Registry: 0x0
    WGA Version: Registered, 1.9.40.0
    Signature Type: Microsoft
    Validation Diagnostic:

    System Scan Data-->
    Scan: Complete
    Cryptography: Complete

    Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: 8
    Cache refresh Interval: 1714 seconds
    Extended notification delay(non-genuine): N/A
    Extended notification delay(un-activated): N/A
    All disabled: N/A
    Reminder reduced: N/A
    File Exists: Yes
    Version: 1.9.40.0
    Signatue Type: Microsoft

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109
    Office Diagnostics: B4D0AA8B-467-80070002

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: D:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{B4E1DB12-7C78-4E00-A72C-C3EE21BC2097}</UGUID><Version>1.5.0540.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro</OS><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-7W8V3</PKey><PID>55274-640-0233974-23781</PID><PIDType>1</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1715567821-1708537768-725345543</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>ASUS </Manufacturer><Model>A7V8X-MX SE</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Phoenix Technologies, LTD</Manufacturer><Version>ASUS A7V8X-MX SE ACPI BIOS Revision 1003 </Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="2"/><Date>20040312000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>22C1370701843D6F</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone></MachineData>   <Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 4:48 PM

Answers

  • Hello enrico_j,

    Right now, the particular computer that generated this mgadiag report has a Volume Licensing edition of XP Pro installed (Line 10), and that installation was done with an Invalid Volume Licensing Key.  Invalid VLKs are generated by pirating programs called "key generators" (keygen for short) that are designed to mimic the same formula that Microsoft uses to generate genuine Porduct Keys.  However, since the Product Key is pirated and not generated by Microsoft, it is Invalid.

    As a rule, VL editions of XP should not be sold to individual consumers.  Businesses, schools and gov'ts normally use VL editions for flexibility in installing many computers.  Also, Volume Licenses are Upgrade Licenses only and cannot be sued as original or base licenses on a new computer.

    This is why you were seeing the "software counterfeiting" messages on your computer, because the current installation of XP is an unauthorized installation. 

    Look on the computer or in the materials that came with your computer to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticity (CoA).  If you have one, tell us about the CoA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?  We would expect it to read Compaq or HPQ.

    4.  DO NOT post the full Product Key that may be on the CoA.

    Not sure what to look for?  Click here:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    Look closely at the exact CD that did this exact installation.  Is the hologrammed label embedded within the plastic of the CD or is it a thin label on the top surface of the CD?

    Put the CD in the computer and navigate to the \i386 folder, then look for the setupp.ini file, a small text file with two sections.  Please copy and paste the last section in your reply to this message.


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 5:06 PM

All replies

  • Hello enrico_j,

    Right now, the particular computer that generated this mgadiag report has a Volume Licensing edition of XP Pro installed (Line 10), and that installation was done with an Invalid Volume Licensing Key.  Invalid VLKs are generated by pirating programs called "key generators" (keygen for short) that are designed to mimic the same formula that Microsoft uses to generate genuine Porduct Keys.  However, since the Product Key is pirated and not generated by Microsoft, it is Invalid.

    As a rule, VL editions of XP should not be sold to individual consumers.  Businesses, schools and gov'ts normally use VL editions for flexibility in installing many computers.  Also, Volume Licenses are Upgrade Licenses only and cannot be sued as original or base licenses on a new computer.

    This is why you were seeing the "software counterfeiting" messages on your computer, because the current installation of XP is an unauthorized installation. 

    Look on the computer or in the materials that came with your computer to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticity (CoA).  If you have one, tell us about the CoA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?  We would expect it to read Compaq or HPQ.

    4.  DO NOT post the full Product Key that may be on the CoA.

    Not sure what to look for?  Click here:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    Look closely at the exact CD that did this exact installation.  Is the hologrammed label embedded within the plastic of the CD or is it a thin label on the top surface of the CD?

    Put the CD in the computer and navigate to the \i386 folder, then look for the setupp.ini file, a small text file with two sections.  Please copy and paste the last section in your reply to this message.


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 5:06 PM
  • Dan,

    Thanks for the response.

    I definitely see the VL and your right, the label is on top of the cd and not embedded

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center: Pro

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering: It reads "OEM Software"

    I have seen pirated disks before, these have good holograms on both sides (inner circle of spindle).

    This is all I found in the setupp.ini

    [Pid]
    ExtraData=xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    Pid=55274270

    I know I had fake software on this computer before so I insisted on puchasing OEMs, I didn't really expect to tell my boss he bought fake software.

    Rico

    PS: I learn a lot from your reply and appreciate the time.

    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 5:41 PM
  • Hello enrico_j,

    Unfortunately, the materials you have are leaning very heavily toward the characteristics often displayed by counterfeit software:

    1.  Hologram label on affixed to the top of the CD rather than embeded within the plastic.
    2.  The CD laying down Volume Licensing bits.
    3.  The last three characters in the PID=value line being "270" or "640" thru "649" rather than "OEM."

    If the last three sections of the Product Key being reported by the mgadiag report GHM73-CD9MX-7W8V3 match the last three sections of the PK printed on the CoA, that's yet another indicator because in this case the PK is being ID'd as Invalid.

    Lastly, if your CD has "For distribution only with a new PC" in the upper left quadrant, that pretty muc verifies that the CD and its associated licensing materials are counterfeited to look like a genuine OEM licensing kit, but really contain Volume Licensing bits.

    Please use the messaging you are seeing from the WGA Notifications Utility to start the process of filling out a piracy report and to send in your materials.  You may qualify to have MS replce the materials for free.  Or you can fill out the report at www.microsoft.com/piracy.

    Good Luck and post back later (about 30 days +/-) when you get the ruling on whether these are high quality counterfeits and whether you got the complimentary replacement XP Pro.

    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 8:00 PM