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Headless, no monitor available, won't connect to network RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I've just received a new router after moving house, I have plugged my headless server into it which I usually access via RDC on my iMac. After plugging it in and booting it up it seems it is not connecting to the network.

    I don't have a monitor available currently to just plug it in and see what's going on.

    Could anyone tell my any blind commands or key sequences I could use to get it going.

    I've tried ctr-alt-del and then entering my Administrator password to no avail.

    Thanks, Tim

    Wednesday, July 13, 2016 1:23 PM

Answers

  • Indeed the subnet plays a role here. You can try to add another IP address to your client PC temporary (assuming both machines are connected to the same switch).

    • Open Network and Sharing Center.
    • Click Change Adapter Settings in the left frame.
    • Right click your LAN Adapter and select Properties.
    • Double click Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IP v4).
    • Give your client PC a fixed IP address in your current subnet (if it does not have one already), if you do not wish to lose Internet connection, otherwise you can also associate an IP from old subnet directly.
    • If you have done the first, click Advanced and on tab IP Settings in IP addresses click Add.
    • Enter an IP address like 192.168.1.2 and subnet mask 255.255.255.0.
    • Confirm the changes.
    • Try to ping the old WHS address. If this works, open a Remote Desktop session to the IP address of WHS, login and change it's IP address, default gateway and DNS server entry. (Confirming will make you lose connection to it, so you have to reconnect to the new IP and then reboot the server.)
    • Revert your clients IP settings.

    The other way around (if the router interface supports this) would be to tell your router to assign IPs in the range of your old network instead of the new and reboot all machines.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf



    Thursday, July 21, 2016 7:58 AM

All replies

  • Look in your router DHCP table to find the IP address of the server (assuming you are using DHCP). Then try "Ping IP_address" in a Cmd window. That will confirm there is a network connection. Then use your browser to try to connect to the server http://IP_address.

    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Wednesday, July 13, 2016 10:14 PM
  • That's the thing, there is no IP for it, it's not connecting to the router at all. I'm wondering if it's stuck at some sort of boot screen, prior to even logging in as I can usually get onto it no problem. I plugged it into the old router since and I was still having the same issue.

    I should be able to get hold of a monitor soon, but I'm sure it'll be a case of 'press this to do this' I could sort instantly.

    • Edited by tim_brp Wednesday, July 13, 2016 10:50 PM
    Wednesday, July 13, 2016 10:48 PM
  • Ah, so the new router is a red herring! The monitor is your friend!

    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Wednesday, July 13, 2016 11:27 PM
  • Hi,

    >I plugged it into the old router since and I was still having the same issue.
    Check to see if any other device is working when attached to the same router/port. 

    If the server is hung and can’t be connected, have a reboot, such as IPMI - KVM, which allows you to remote control the server including turning it on/off.

    Best Regards,
    Eve Wang


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, July 14, 2016 5:51 AM
  • Did the server use a fixed IP address before? If you do not see any information about a IP registration in your router (given it supports this stuff), this could be the case. It might also be helpful to know the old and the new router model name for being eventually able to give you blind support.

    Maybe (and this is often the case) your new router uses a different DHCP range now. If you know the original address of your server or PC, you could try to assign one to your PC manually and attempt to access it through remote desktop to change it.

    There are other issues ... different subnet may cause your client to raise the Windows Firewall etc.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf


    Friday, July 15, 2016 2:29 PM
  • It did have a fixed IP address yes. It doesn't show up on the DHCP table which was my first point of call.

    I've been away all weekend so haven't managed to source a monitor as yet, very frustrating.

    The new router is a Virgin Hub 3.0 and the address is 192.168.0.1 - whereas the old one was 192.168.1.1, does this indicate that the subnet is different and could be what is causing the issues? The servers static IP was set to 192.168.1.33.
    • Edited by tim_brp Tuesday, July 19, 2016 10:22 PM
    Tuesday, July 19, 2016 10:16 PM
  • Hi,

    This may be the cause. Log on locally and check the details.

    Post here if any update about this problem. 

    Best Regards,
    Eve Wang

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, July 21, 2016 7:44 AM
  • Indeed the subnet plays a role here. You can try to add another IP address to your client PC temporary (assuming both machines are connected to the same switch).

    • Open Network and Sharing Center.
    • Click Change Adapter Settings in the left frame.
    • Right click your LAN Adapter and select Properties.
    • Double click Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IP v4).
    • Give your client PC a fixed IP address in your current subnet (if it does not have one already), if you do not wish to lose Internet connection, otherwise you can also associate an IP from old subnet directly.
    • If you have done the first, click Advanced and on tab IP Settings in IP addresses click Add.
    • Enter an IP address like 192.168.1.2 and subnet mask 255.255.255.0.
    • Confirm the changes.
    • Try to ping the old WHS address. If this works, open a Remote Desktop session to the IP address of WHS, login and change it's IP address, default gateway and DNS server entry. (Confirming will make you lose connection to it, so you have to reconnect to the new IP and then reboot the server.)
    • Revert your clients IP settings.

    The other way around (if the router interface supports this) would be to tell your router to assign IPs in the range of your old network instead of the new and reboot all machines.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf



    Thursday, July 21, 2016 7:58 AM