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Adding Drive - Says not partitioned RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello there,

     

    I am quite the novice on WHS.  I have an HP EX470 (poor poor HP support).

     

    It had a single 500 gig drive.  I wanted to add a second 500 gig drive to use as backup for the first.

     

    Yesterday, I bought a Seagate ST3500641AS drive, 500Gig, SATA, 16Mb cache.

     

    Today, I added in in the top bay.

     

    WHS reconizes it but tells me (very slowly) that it needs to be partitioned and formated before WHS can add it.  How do I do that?  I have no other computers that use SATA drive to do this with.

     

    I have logged in to the WHS via the remote console on my Windows Vista/32 machine (slow - direct network cable connect though Netgear route).  Cool, until today, I didn;'t know I could do that.  I still can't figure out what to do.

     

    Help!!!!!  Thanks.

     

    Dave

     

    P.S. - any way to attach a monitor to the HP WHS?  I see that the Hardware Device Manager see video hardware.

    Saturday, August 2, 2008 9:13 PM

Answers

  • To partition and format:
    • Log into your server using Remote Desktop. Be very cautious; the tool you will have to use can severely damage your server (permanent data loss severity).
    • Start Disk Management by e.g. opening the Start menu, selecting Run, then typing 'diskmgmt.msc' and pressing Enter.
    • You should see two or more disks in the lower part of the display. One of them will be 'Unallocated'. Right click the bar on the right side, and select 'New Partition...' from the context menu.
    • The New Partition Wizard will start. Click Next.
    • On the Next screen, ensure that 'Primary partition' is selected, and click Next.
    • Allow it to allocate the full disk (it doesn't really matter, to be honest) and click Next.
    • Allow the wizard to assign a drive letter if you like; it won't matter in the end. Click Next.
    • Select 'Format this partition with the following settings:' and make sure that File system is NTFS. The other two options don't matter. Check off 'Perform a quick format' and click Next.
    • Click Finish.
    After the Wizard finishes you may have to reboot your server (I don't have an unpartitioned/OEM disk to test with). Take a look in the console first to see if you disk now shows up as available to add to the server pool.
    Saturday, August 2, 2008 10:31 PM
    Moderator
  • If you haven't added the drive to the storage pool for the server to use automatically for data storage, then what you see is correct.

    If you want to use that drive to back up your shared folders, then you will have to open the Console, go into the Computers & Backup tab and, after highlighting your server, you will find that the 'Backup' button is enabled, allowing you to back up your files. It is a manual process, so for example, you could then remove the drive and store it off-site.

     

    Colin

     

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 2:57 PM
  • Windows Home Server doesn't use RAID. If you install the software yourself, it's possible to install on hardware that uses RAID, but that's an unsupported configuration.

    If you've installed the drive and configured it as a server backup drive, then you will see that the server is now visible on the 'Computers & Backup' tab. You can select your server on that tab and either choose to 'View backups' or 'Backup now'. But  in my opinion using an internal drive as a backup drive isn't the best use of that drive. An internal drive is (semi-) permanently mounted in the server, and if a disaster destroys the server, it will destroy the backup drive as well. A backup drive should be an external drive; you can take it to another location (your office, for example) when you're not backing up your server.

    The best use of an internal drive is to increase your server storage and turn on share duplication for some or all of your shares.

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 3:04 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • To partition and format:
    • Log into your server using Remote Desktop. Be very cautious; the tool you will have to use can severely damage your server (permanent data loss severity).
    • Start Disk Management by e.g. opening the Start menu, selecting Run, then typing 'diskmgmt.msc' and pressing Enter.
    • You should see two or more disks in the lower part of the display. One of them will be 'Unallocated'. Right click the bar on the right side, and select 'New Partition...' from the context menu.
    • The New Partition Wizard will start. Click Next.
    • On the Next screen, ensure that 'Primary partition' is selected, and click Next.
    • Allow it to allocate the full disk (it doesn't really matter, to be honest) and click Next.
    • Allow the wizard to assign a drive letter if you like; it won't matter in the end. Click Next.
    • Select 'Format this partition with the following settings:' and make sure that File system is NTFS. The other two options don't matter. Check off 'Perform a quick format' and click Next.
    • Click Finish.
    After the Wizard finishes you may have to reboot your server (I don't have an unpartitioned/OEM disk to test with). Take a look in the console first to see if you disk now shows up as available to add to the server pool.
    Saturday, August 2, 2008 10:31 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you.  That was very detailed help!

     

    Saturday, August 2, 2008 10:35 PM
  • Another question.  With the second 500 gig drive added as a backup drive, when will MHS start ghosting to that drive?  Can any of the balancing times be configured/  Are those times know?

     

    Saturday, August 2, 2008 10:38 PM
  • If you add it to the storage pool, Windows Home Server will start using it immediately once you designate some shares for duplication. Balancing is not configurable, and happens once an hour. If you add it specifically as a backup drive, Windows Home Server will allow you to take a backup of your server shares at any time you want, but it's not scheduled; you have to take positive action to cause a backup to occur.
    Sunday, August 3, 2008 1:07 AM
    Moderator
  • I think your problem comes from not loading the new drive into the right bay. You are supposed to start at the bottom. Therefore, your new drive would go in the 2nd slot from the bottom.

    You did fold down the flap at the back of the drive tray, right?

    Also, does the drive have a jumper on it? If so, remove it; it only limits your speed.

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 8:07 AM
  • Okay, I am not 100% sure I understand.

     

    It's been a day and still there is 100% available space available on the new drive.  I set it up as a back-up drive for the server and not an expansion drive.  I want the server to back itself up, like RAID. 

     

    Is my concept wrong of what I was thinking for this new drive?  I want my network files backup (hopefully automatically).  I do not need more space, yet.  I just want to make sure that when the original drive fails, all I have to do is replace the original drive with a new blank one and the server continues on with no loss of files.

     

    Does that make sence and is it possible?

     

    Also, as someone else suggested, I should have put the new drive in the bay directly above the original one.  For airflow considerations, I used the drive bay third from the bottom.  HP's document showed using the TOP bay and their placement of the original drive was in the botton bay.  I figured better airflow in the 2nd bay from the top.  I didn't think it mattered.  Does it?


    Thanks kindly

     

    Dave

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 2:03 PM
  • Yes on folding the flap.  Don't think it would have fit without doing that.

     

    No on removing the jumper.  I figured that was for addressing the drive and thought I would first try it without changing that.  I am not familiar with SATA drives.  What is the purpose of the jumper?  It is a Seagate drive.

     

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 2:09 PM
  • If you haven't added the drive to the storage pool for the server to use automatically for data storage, then what you see is correct.

    If you want to use that drive to back up your shared folders, then you will have to open the Console, go into the Computers & Backup tab and, after highlighting your server, you will find that the 'Backup' button is enabled, allowing you to back up your files. It is a manual process, so for example, you could then remove the drive and store it off-site.

     

    Colin

     

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 2:57 PM
  • Windows Home Server doesn't use RAID. If you install the software yourself, it's possible to install on hardware that uses RAID, but that's an unsupported configuration.

    If you've installed the drive and configured it as a server backup drive, then you will see that the server is now visible on the 'Computers & Backup' tab. You can select your server on that tab and either choose to 'View backups' or 'Backup now'. But  in my opinion using an internal drive as a backup drive isn't the best use of that drive. An internal drive is (semi-) permanently mounted in the server, and if a disaster destroys the server, it will destroy the backup drive as well. A backup drive should be an external drive; you can take it to another location (your office, for example) when you're not backing up your server.

    The best use of an internal drive is to increase your server storage and turn on share duplication for some or all of your shares.

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 3:04 PM
    Moderator
  • Ah, very good; thank you.  It will add iteself to the nightly backup's along with the computer that are on-line? 

     

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 3:49 PM
  •  

    According to the Seagate support documentation, "The jumper block adjacent to the SATA interface connector on SATA 300MB/sec drives can be used to force the drive into SATA 150MB/sec mode for use with older SATA controllers that only work with SATA 150MB/sec drives."

    They then show a diagram showing no jumper as "normal operation" and a jumper as "Limit data transfer rate to 1.5 Gbits per second."

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 7:12 PM
  •  Davek01 wrote:

     

    Also, as someone else suggested, I should have put the new drive in the bay directly above the original one.  For airflow considerations, I used the drive bay third from the bottom.  HP's document showed using the TOP bay and their placement of the original drive was in the botton bay.  I figured better airflow in the 2nd bay from the top.  I didn't think it mattered.  Does it?


     

    I am holding in my hand the HP EXS470 "Using the Server" document. On Page 6-6 , when discussing adding a SATA drive to an expansion bay, it says "Add the new hard drive to the lowest available expansion bay."

     

    Likewise, if you look at the EX470 "Setup Poster" , it says "Open the door on the front of the server and gently remove the lowest empty hard disk drive tray." under the section "Adding an Internal Hard Disk Drive to your HP MediaSmart Server.

     

    I don't know if this matters, but I think it's usually safer to follow instructions, unless you have good reason not to.

    Sunday, August 3, 2008 7:21 PM
  • Another question.  I have backep up the server to my new spare 500gigdrive.  I selected all backup options.

     

    Now would I be able to remove the original hard drive and operate the WHS off the the backup drive?  I would have hope setting the new drive up as a backup drive that the system could withstand the failure of the main drive.  Is this how it operates?

    Monday, August 4, 2008 3:57 AM
  • As is documented in the Power Pack 1 release notes, the only thing backed up by a server backup drive is the files in your shares. What you're describing is RAID 1 (mirroring) which is not supported.
    Monday, August 4, 2008 12:26 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the info.  Loosing the main boot drive sounds like a major pain in the rump then.  I thought a server backup drive would have done just that backup the server and not just the data.  The HP EX470 become less and less impressive.

     

    Monday, August 4, 2008 3:34 PM
  • I have the same problem; a new drive and no way to Partition/Format it as a Server backup drive.  I can't use Remote Desktop to login as suggested, it doesn't allow me to login (I have remote acces on the PC I'm running from & Admin rights). Any other way to configure the drive?
    Wednesday, September 3, 2008 5:45 AM
  • RT, you will need to use the password you created for the server console when you attempt to log in using Remote Desktop.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, September 3, 2008 11:36 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Ken, but that is the password I'm using and I still get the long winded dialog box about remote access rights etc.
    Wednesday, September 3, 2008 12:13 PM
  • Can you let us know the exact error message you see when you attempt to use Remote Desktop to connect to your Home Server? And where are you attempting to connect from? Another computer on your home network? Your place of business? Starbucks?
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, September 3, 2008 2:02 PM
    Moderator
  • Well I finally got remote access working and got logged into the WHS (finally got my Zonealarm Z100G firewall/router configured).  However, it looks just like running the server manager console from any of the connected PC's.  I sure don't see a Start button and Run command on the WHS Server Console; obviously you have that on the PC your running from, but disk manager only looks at the PC's connected disk not the WHS. 

    Are we on the same page? 

    I can take the drive out of the server and partition/format on a PC, then reinstall into the WHS, but I'm hoping their is a way to avoid that step and configure the bare drive in the server itself.  Your thoughts?
    Thursday, September 4, 2008 3:17 AM
  • RT Hill said:

    Well I finally got remote access working and got logged into the WHS (finally got my Zonealarm Z100G firewall/router configured).  However, it looks just like running the server manager console from any of the connected PC's.  I sure don't see a Start button and Run command on the WHS Server Console; obviously you have that on the PC your running from, but disk manager only looks at the PC's connected disk not the WHS. 

    Are we on the same page? 

    I can take the drive out of the server and partition/format on a PC, then reinstall into the WHS, but I'm hoping their is a way to avoid that step and configure the bare drive in the server itself.  Your thoughts?


    RT, Remote Desktop isn't the same thing as the remote access web site. It's a way of accessing a remote computer just as though you were sitting in front of it with a monitor, keyboard and mouse. It's also unsupported as an access method for Windows Home Server, though it sometimes supplies a quicker way to get things done than the supported methods. To connect to your home server using Remote Desktop:
    • On XP, Start → Run → type MSTSC.exe and press Enter, or
    • On Vista, Start → type MSTSC.exe in the search box and press Enter.
    • Type your server name and press Enter.
    • Type the user name Administrator, and the password for the server console, and press Enter.
    A warning will display. Take it to heart; there are tools here (including Disk Management, though formatting a drive that's not in the storage pool is harmless) that can severely damage your server, potentially resulting in data loss. That's why anything done in a Remote Desktop session with your server is "unsupported".

    The only supported way to format your drive would be to remove it from your server temporarily and format it on some other computer.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, September 4, 2008 11:28 AM
    Moderator
  • Hello Ken,

    I'm aware of the difference of the tools, however my problem was trying to use remote desktop to the server using my username not Administrator.  Once I used Administrator as you directed....everything worked like a charm.  Thanks much for the insight and help......
    Thursday, September 4, 2008 6:31 PM