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Reactivate XP OEM RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi there,

    I had to replace a motherboard and RAM for a friend as hers had fried and after doing this I am informed by Microsoft that number 1: I am not authorised to do that and number 2: the activation isn't working as the motherboard has changed and I need to replace the motherboard with the exact same kind as the original.  In response to number 1, I am authorised to do it, who decides that anyway? Besides, the store at which she bought it has long since closed and in response to number 2, the original motherboard is no longer available as it is outdated. This reason is also why I had to replace the RAM.

    I don't think it's unreasonable to expect I can reactivate this copy of Windows given the circumstances.  I realise that OEM software is tied more or less to the hardware but when the hardware dies and cannot be replaced with exactly the same kind due to unavailability, I think it unfair to be told "You have to buy a new copy of Windows". 

    Surely there must be exceptions to this OEM system under the above circumstances?

    I have spoken to a support person on the phone who told me rather bluntly I had no options other than to buy a new copy all the while he found my predicament quite amusing! I don't appreciate being treated this way, I hope that's not how all clients are treated.

    I would appreciate a resolution to this problem.

    Thanks.
    Tuesday, August 18, 2009 8:18 AM

Answers

  • Hello Scotto1971,

     My apologies, the person that explained the OEM Licensing Terms, to you, did not do a very good job. We'll see if I can better explain them. 

     One of the primary Licensing Terms for OEM Windows is that it is tied to the first computer it is installed on (meaning it can not be installed on any other computers).  The reason for this (and some other OEM Licensing limitations) is because OEM software is sold at a substantial discount. And even though you did not buy the OEM Software directly, the OEM Licensing Terms were passed to you when the Computer's Manufacturer sold the computer (with the OEM Windows already installed) to you.

     Since computer parts are easily added and removed, Microsoft had to decide what the core part that Defines the computer as a whole. (Meaning if that part was changed, a new computer would be created). Microsoft decided that the Motherboard was the most logical part.

       Those two paragraphs come togeather to mean that if you have a computer with a OEM copy of Windows installed and the Motherboard is changed, then that OEM copy of Windows is no longer Licensed to run on that computer. 

      The only exception to this rule is if the Motherboard was changed out due to Warranty service. The motherboard must be changed out, usually by the manufacturer of the computer, for the same or equivalent model motherboard. Only in this exception, would the OEM Windows still be licensed to run on the computer even after the new Motherboard was installed.

      If your situation does not qualify under the exception to the OEM Licensing Terms, then the OEM software that was installed on your friend's computer (before the motherboard change) is no longer licensed to run on the computer once the new motherboard is installed.  In other words, the OEM's Licensing expired at the same time the Motherboard burnt out.


    I have inclided links to the OEM End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) for both XP Home and Pro.
    In both EULAs you can find the relevent information under section: "1. Grant of Licensce", see paragraph 2 that starts " Software as a Component of the Computer - Transfer..."

    OEM EULA for XP Home:  http://download.microsoft.com/Documents/UseTerms/Windows XP_Home Edition_English_c38be9c0-616c-4879-826a-9daf62123a7a.pdf

    OEM EULA for XP Pro: http://download.microsoft.com/Documents/UseTerms/Windows XP_Professional_English_0983ff38-f3c7-4a61-b0e0-579b807a3e26.pdf

    I hope that clarifies the situation,
    Thank you,
    Darin MS
    Tuesday, August 18, 2009 6:30 PM

All replies

  • Hello Scotto1971,

    We understand the inconvenience you are currently experiencing and would like to provide you with some self-help options we have made available for our customers. Please follow the steps outlined below as it could either resolve your issue or, if need be, provide us with additional information to determine the cause of this issue.

                                                          

    1.      Ensure you log onto the computer experiencing the issue with “Administrator” rights.

    2.      Next we would like to confirm that you are running the most current version of the Genuine Advantage control on your computer. In order to do this please follow the below link and choose the “Validate Windows” option.

     

    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine

     

    If the above steps did not resolve your issue lets continue with the steps below.

    If you could also please follow the steps outlined below, the diagnostics Web Site will attempt to resolve the validation errors you are experiencing with Windows.

    http://www.microsoft.com/Genuine/diag/RunDiags.aspx?displayLang=en

    Next follow the on-screen prompts to resolve the issue if any of the checks at the above site fail. If, after attempting to resolve the issue as per the instructions on the above site fails, please refer to the link below and run the MGA Diagnostics tool:

     

    http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012

     

    You will be prompted to either “Run” or “Save” the tool. Choose to “Run” the tool and follow the on-screen prompts. You will receive an “Internet Explorer-Security Warning” dialog box for the “Windows Genuine Advantage Diagnostic Tool”; you must choose to “Run” this tool when prompted.

     

    Once you are presented with the Diagnostics tool choose “Continue” to run the diagnostic report. If the “RESOLVE” button is available after running the diagnostics, please click “RESOLVE” to allow the diagnostic tool to attempt a repair.

     

    1.      After running the MGA Diagnostic tool, click on the “Windows” tab and then click on “Copy”.

    2.      Please return to this post and “Paste” the results here for additional review.

     

    Next look on the computer itself, in the documentation you received with the computer or with your retail purchase of Windows to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticity (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another version of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

     

    NOTE: The data collected with the Genuine Diagnostics Tool does NOT contain any information that can personally identify you and can be fully reviewed, by you, before being posted.


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Tuesday, August 18, 2009 2:24 PM
  • Hello Scotto1971,

     My apologies, the person that explained the OEM Licensing Terms, to you, did not do a very good job. We'll see if I can better explain them. 

     One of the primary Licensing Terms for OEM Windows is that it is tied to the first computer it is installed on (meaning it can not be installed on any other computers).  The reason for this (and some other OEM Licensing limitations) is because OEM software is sold at a substantial discount. And even though you did not buy the OEM Software directly, the OEM Licensing Terms were passed to you when the Computer's Manufacturer sold the computer (with the OEM Windows already installed) to you.

     Since computer parts are easily added and removed, Microsoft had to decide what the core part that Defines the computer as a whole. (Meaning if that part was changed, a new computer would be created). Microsoft decided that the Motherboard was the most logical part.

       Those two paragraphs come togeather to mean that if you have a computer with a OEM copy of Windows installed and the Motherboard is changed, then that OEM copy of Windows is no longer Licensed to run on that computer. 

      The only exception to this rule is if the Motherboard was changed out due to Warranty service. The motherboard must be changed out, usually by the manufacturer of the computer, for the same or equivalent model motherboard. Only in this exception, would the OEM Windows still be licensed to run on the computer even after the new Motherboard was installed.

      If your situation does not qualify under the exception to the OEM Licensing Terms, then the OEM software that was installed on your friend's computer (before the motherboard change) is no longer licensed to run on the computer once the new motherboard is installed.  In other words, the OEM's Licensing expired at the same time the Motherboard burnt out.


    I have inclided links to the OEM End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) for both XP Home and Pro.
    In both EULAs you can find the relevent information under section: "1. Grant of Licensce", see paragraph 2 that starts " Software as a Component of the Computer - Transfer..."

    OEM EULA for XP Home:  http://download.microsoft.com/Documents/UseTerms/Windows XP_Home Edition_English_c38be9c0-616c-4879-826a-9daf62123a7a.pdf

    OEM EULA for XP Pro: http://download.microsoft.com/Documents/UseTerms/Windows XP_Professional_English_0983ff38-f3c7-4a61-b0e0-579b807a3e26.pdf

    I hope that clarifies the situation,
    Thank you,
    Darin MS
    Tuesday, August 18, 2009 6:30 PM