locked
Windows XP Pro Validation Fails RRS feed

  • Question

  • Been fighting with this one for hours. Tried everything I could find online with no luck. I have the original packaging with the CD and MSoft Sticker with the hologram and all. But won't validate no matter what I do. I have tried reinstalling also. What now? Here is the output from the diagnostic tool:

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.7.0012.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Invalid Product Key
    Detailed Status: N/A
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-4VD63-QY6P7-4XJGQ
    Windows Product Key Hash: +Yo68E9iauoCMItrYz8Qoq5R5DA=
    Windows Product ID: 55274-640-6440851-23268
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro
    ID: 8542e1e6-1a29-4728-844c-501d86306481
    Is Admin: Yes
    AutoDial:
    Registry: 0x0
    WGA Version: Registered, 1.5.530.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Product Name: N/A
    Architecture: N/A
    Build lab: N/A
    TTS Error: N/A
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: Failed to retrieve file version. - 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: FCEE394C-3178-80070002_B4D0AA8B-469-80070002

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>8542e1e6-1a29-4728-844c-501d86306481</UGUID><Version>1.7.0012.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro</OS><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-4XJGQ</PKey><PID>55274-640-6440851-23268</PID><PIDType>1</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1085031214-1993962763-854245398</SID><SYSTEM/><BIOS/><HWID>6356349F0184C05A</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Pacific Standard Time(GMT-08:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/></MachineData>   <Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

     

    Sunday, April 22, 2007 6:39 PM

Answers

  • SoccerGuy3,

    Right now, your computer has a Volume Licensing (VL) edition of XP Pro installed (Line 8), and that installation was done with an invalid Volume Licensing Key (VLK) (Line 2).  VLKs are invalidated by Microsoft at the report of the original keyholder for such reasons as the key was lost, stolen, compromised, or misused.  Also, MS may have invalidated the key if it was generated by a non-MS Key Generator program.

    As a rule, VL editions of XP should not be sold to individual consumers.  Businesses, schools and gov'ts normally use VL editions for flexibility in installing many computers.  Also, Volume Licenses for XP are upgrade licenses only and can never be used as the orginal or base license for a computer.

    This is why you were seeing the "software counterfeiting" messages on the computer, because the current installation of XP is an unauthorized installation.

    The next step in the process is to look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer or with your retail purchase of Windows to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or some other version?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  Click here:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

     

    Next check the portion of the Product Key being reported by the mgadiag utility, 4VD63-QY6P7-4XJGQ, if it matches the corresponding portion of the Product Key printed on the COA.  Do they match?

     

    Next, compare your materials to known hi-quality counterfeit materials here:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/counterfeit.mspx

     

    Finally, on your CD, open up the setupp.ini file located in the \i386 folder.  Post the last line of the small file, which should be 8 characters.

    Sunday, April 22, 2007 7:06 PM
  • SoccerGuy3,

     

    The kidney-shaped CoAs are relatively new, they were introduced in August 2005, so counterfeit copies may be relatively rare.

     

    You definitely have an invalid Product Key, so if that invalid PK is printed on a CoA it casts significant doubt on the genuineness of the CoA, and the fact that your OEM CD does not have OEM in the setupp.ini file also seriously impeaches the validity of the CD.  As many nails in the coffin as that is, only an analysis by Microsoft cryptography can say for sure whether what you have is "really" counterfeit.

     

    What you do now is a matter of personal preference.  If you choose to file a counterfeit report and submit the materials, it will take about 30 days or so for MS to pass judgment and if the materials are indeed counterfeit, they will send you a free WGA kit, which consists of a genuine full retail XP CD (in your case XP Pro).  A full retail CD will be able to perform an inplace upgrade/repair that is designed to preserve your data, installed programs, and personal settings (although its always wise to back up before!), and that installation will "genuine-ize" your installation.  If you purchase a full retail copy of XP at a local store, you will be able to accomplish the same thing, but the typical price for a full retail copy of XP Pro is around $299 USD.  You may be able to accomplish it as well with an upgrade retail copy, but I cannot say for sure from experience.

     

    You won't be able to install IE7 until the issue of Genuine is ironed out.

    Thursday, April 26, 2007 12:28 AM

All replies

  • SoccerGuy3,

    Right now, your computer has a Volume Licensing (VL) edition of XP Pro installed (Line 8), and that installation was done with an invalid Volume Licensing Key (VLK) (Line 2).  VLKs are invalidated by Microsoft at the report of the original keyholder for such reasons as the key was lost, stolen, compromised, or misused.  Also, MS may have invalidated the key if it was generated by a non-MS Key Generator program.

    As a rule, VL editions of XP should not be sold to individual consumers.  Businesses, schools and gov'ts normally use VL editions for flexibility in installing many computers.  Also, Volume Licenses for XP are upgrade licenses only and can never be used as the orginal or base license for a computer.

    This is why you were seeing the "software counterfeiting" messages on the computer, because the current installation of XP is an unauthorized installation.

    The next step in the process is to look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer or with your retail purchase of Windows to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or some other version?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  Click here:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

     

    Next check the portion of the Product Key being reported by the mgadiag utility, 4VD63-QY6P7-4XJGQ, if it matches the corresponding portion of the Product Key printed on the COA.  Do they match?

     

    Next, compare your materials to known hi-quality counterfeit materials here:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/counterfeit.mspx

     

    Finally, on your CD, open up the setupp.ini file located in the \i386 folder.  Post the last line of the small file, which should be 8 characters.

    Sunday, April 22, 2007 7:06 PM
  • Yes I have a COA. It is for Windows XP Pro OEM Software. No manufacturer listed.

     

    mgadiag Utility numbers match the COA

     

    Setupp.ini Info: Pid=55274270

     

    Now what. Should I report the seller for selling something that was stolen? Can I get this going without being out a ton more money?

    Wednesday, April 25, 2007 3:17 AM
  • SoccerGuy3,

    The characteristics of the materials you purchased are consistent with counterfeit software:

    1.  A CoA that has an invalid, keygen Product Key printed on it.

    2.  A CD that purports to be a systembuilder/OEM CD but in reality contains Volume Licensing Edition bits for XP Pro.  A genuine systembuilder/OEM CD would have the letters "OEM" as the last three characters of the setupp.ini file data.  Your CD has the number "270" as the last three characters in the setupp.ini file, which is indicative of early Volume Licensing CDs.

     

    Please have a close look at the counterfeit gallery here:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/counterfeit.mspx  If your materials seem to be consistent with the hi-quality counterfeits shown, you should submit a counterfeit report by clicking on the WGA start icon in your system tray and follow the prompts.  If Microsoft deems your materials hi-quality counterfeits, you will receive complimentary replacements.  The evaluation process is said to take about four weeks.

    Wednesday, April 25, 2007 3:39 AM
  • Checking the counterfeit site makes me think the disk is genuine. I however don't see the type/shape of label that the COA is printed on (mine is kidney shaped). So is this a counterfeit or not? Anyway to install IE 7 in the mean time or am I screwed until this is resolved? If I buy a full retail package can I just update my current install (so I don't lose settings and such)?
    Wednesday, April 25, 2007 5:02 AM
  • SoccerGuy3,

     

    The kidney-shaped CoAs are relatively new, they were introduced in August 2005, so counterfeit copies may be relatively rare.

     

    You definitely have an invalid Product Key, so if that invalid PK is printed on a CoA it casts significant doubt on the genuineness of the CoA, and the fact that your OEM CD does not have OEM in the setupp.ini file also seriously impeaches the validity of the CD.  As many nails in the coffin as that is, only an analysis by Microsoft cryptography can say for sure whether what you have is "really" counterfeit.

     

    What you do now is a matter of personal preference.  If you choose to file a counterfeit report and submit the materials, it will take about 30 days or so for MS to pass judgment and if the materials are indeed counterfeit, they will send you a free WGA kit, which consists of a genuine full retail XP CD (in your case XP Pro).  A full retail CD will be able to perform an inplace upgrade/repair that is designed to preserve your data, installed programs, and personal settings (although its always wise to back up before!), and that installation will "genuine-ize" your installation.  If you purchase a full retail copy of XP at a local store, you will be able to accomplish the same thing, but the typical price for a full retail copy of XP Pro is around $299 USD.  You may be able to accomplish it as well with an upgrade retail copy, but I cannot say for sure from experience.

     

    You won't be able to install IE7 until the issue of Genuine is ironed out.

    Thursday, April 26, 2007 12:28 AM