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Restore - Red X When Selecting Drive RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm attempting to restore from the Home Server back to my RAID drive that I had to rebuild do to one of the drives going bad.  I have restored in the past but I don't recall having this problem.  Basically when I select the backup to restore and then it asks where to restore it shows the drive to be restore in the drop down box and the destination drive but there is a RED X and it won't let me continue.  I have tried deleting the partition and recreating it, Formatting different ways, not formatting, not assigning a name and all the various combinations.  Both the source and the destination are exactly the same size as it is a Raid Array created from two 74GB Raptor drives.  Is there anything I can do to force it to continue?  Is there a utility or something that will tell me why it won't let me continue?

    Thanks in advance,

    Adam
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 6:06 PM

Answers

  • Hi,
    usually the red X appears, if the target volume is smaller than the source volume was (independent of the real size of data on the drives). A few KByte less may be enough for this to happen - and I don't know any direct way (without either larger size of the target or involving another volume, which could be also an external drive) for restore.
    What was the reason for restore? Maybe bad clusters? In this case they may have been mapped out of the disk, but the size of the now created volume shrunk, which could explain such a behavior.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 6:36 PM
    Moderator
  • I can think of a number of possibilities. Most likely Windows Home Server believes the partition currently existing on the array is slightly smaller than the partition that was backed up. (There are a number of ways this can happen; which one is the real cause is normally immaterial.) The only way around this that I'm aware of is to use a larger hard drive , or in your case a larger pair of drives.

    There are other possibilities, though. Are you using the correct drivers? Is your BIOS properly configured? Et cetera...

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 6:38 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,
    usually the red X appears, if the target volume is smaller than the source volume was (independent of the real size of data on the drives). A few KByte less may be enough for this to happen - and I don't know any direct way (without either larger size of the target or involving another volume, which could be also an external drive) for restore.
    What was the reason for restore? Maybe bad clusters? In this case they may have been mapped out of the disk, but the size of the now created volume shrunk, which could explain such a behavior.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 6:36 PM
    Moderator
  • I can think of a number of possibilities. Most likely Windows Home Server believes the partition currently existing on the array is slightly smaller than the partition that was backed up. (There are a number of ways this can happen; which one is the real cause is normally immaterial.) The only way around this that I'm aware of is to use a larger hard drive , or in your case a larger pair of drives.

    There are other possibilities, though. Are you using the correct drivers? Is your BIOS properly configured? Et cetera...

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 6:38 PM
    Moderator
  • I was afraid of that.  One of the RAptors was failing so I got a refurbished replacement and it's possible that it had some mapped bad sectors that would make the drive slightly smaller.  I have tried variations of several different drivers, from the motherboard cd and the latest online.  I guess my only choice is to restore to a different drive, maybe I have one somewhere large enough, then use a program like Ghost to back it up and then restore it back to the hard drives.  Not an ideal solution at all.  It would be nice if Home Server didn't have this restriction.

    Thanks for your help!

    Adam
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 6:47 PM
  • Hi Adam,
    I agree with you here and have made a suggestion in this direction at Microsoft Connect some time ago.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 7:41 PM
    Moderator
  • agree! please can you provide a link to your suggestion to vote on it. this restriction is painful, special if you want to "eliminate" a client raid to switch to a normal connected drive. thanks
    kind regards...
    Friday, February 13, 2009 5:12 AM
  • Hi,
    here is the link.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, February 13, 2009 7:04 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Olaf!

    I ended up restoring my drive to a 750 GB drive and will re-image it to the smaller drive tonight.  Home Server works flawlessly as long as the drive is the same size or bigger but is nearly useless in situations like this... granted at least I do have a backup!
    Friday, February 13, 2009 1:36 PM
  • For myself, I will ask "why would anyone want to restore to a smaller disk?" Mass storage devices are cheaper per GB every month (every week!) and it's not uncommon to see a smaller disk drive that's just a few months old costing slightly more than a larger drive that was just introduced. Since Microsoft feels that RAID is not a consumer technology (for reasons I agree with, though I also have a RAID array on my primary workstation at home), the restriction that you've hit is one that's designed into the product.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, February 13, 2009 4:50 PM
    Moderator
  • 6pack said:

    I ended up restoring my drive to a 750 GB drive and will re-image it to the smaller drive tonight.  Home Server works flawlessly as long as the drive is the same size or bigger but is nearly useless in situations like this... granted at least I do have a backup!


    Hi,
    one idea, how you can eventually bring the backup back to your original disk (although I tend also to agree with Kens opinion).
    Attach the disk to a system running Vista, which is also a client. (Or use a Vista DVDs repair command prompt for the first steps.)
    Open command prompt.
    Enter following commands:
    diskpart
    list volume (take note, which is the volume you restored)
    select volume x (replace X with the number or drive letter of the above determined volume)
    shrink

    This will reduce the size of the volume as much as possible (the limit to which the volume can be cut is the last sector containing files).
    Now backup this volume on one of your other clients.
    After succeeding, restore it to the original disk.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, February 13, 2009 10:31 PM
    Moderator
  • Hello Ken,

    the answer for your sixty-four-dollar question:) 
    special if you want to reorganize a client which is working on RAID enviroment (e.g. RAID 0 or RAID 5) to a normal single HDD. While working with WHS a former needed RAID 5 for a client as the only security management could be obsolete, so Microsoft please open up the possebility migrating/ recovering a client with a (much) smaller HDD.

    kind regards...
    Saturday, February 28, 2009 5:37 PM
  • Not to mention the fact that even though hard drives are getting cheaper, why in the world would anyone want to replace their perfectly good hard drive if they had to recover from some software problem such as a virus?  Not to mention that if you are running a raptor drive or SSD, they aren't cheap and sometimes aren't available in larger sizes!  Apparently the way it currently works you pretty much have no choice unless you can do something similar to what I did and use another solution after recovering to a larger hard drive that I borrowed.  I know Microsoft has the ability to do this, there are some very smart cookies working there and many a technology to cover such things!

    Adam
    Saturday, February 28, 2009 9:07 PM