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Where to start? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have coded a few apps using ASP.net, VB and Visual Studio, but have only learned the minimum to get job done.  What e-learning path should I take to fill in all the gaps from basic knowledge to advanced.  It seems the e-learning jumps in at 2-3 years experience level.  Are there e-learning courses that start with basics?  Certification is my ultimate goal.  Currently, I have plenty of time to go through all the courses.

    Thanks.
    Monday, June 30, 2008 6:36 PM

Answers

  • Scott-

    You might want to try the Microsoft Beginner Developer Learning Center before the E-Learning if you are looking for more of a foundation before progressing to whichever path you like better.

    Dave
    Monday, June 30, 2008 8:22 PM
    Answerer
  • It is hard to determine how basic you want. However, you can browse the e-Learning courses and click on the links. When you click on any of the course titles, you will see a section titled "Audience". This section will give you a clear definition of who this course is for and what you should know before taking it.
    Michael D. Alligood, MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+ www.theitclassroom.com
    Monday, June 30, 2008 6:45 PM

All replies

  • It is hard to determine how basic you want. However, you can browse the e-Learning courses and click on the links. When you click on any of the course titles, you will see a section titled "Audience". This section will give you a clear definition of who this course is for and what you should know before taking it.
    Michael D. Alligood, MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+ www.theitclassroom.com
    Monday, June 30, 2008 6:45 PM
  • Thanks Michael.

     I am not sure how basic either.  I don't know, what I don't know,  if that makes sense.   I don't believe the courses have "prerequisites" like college courses.  For example, "Prerequisites CIS101, CIS102  for  CIS201" ? 

    I'll check the "Audience" and see if it gives me a better idea.

    Scott
    Monday, June 30, 2008 7:05 PM
  • Hi Scott,

    In Asp.net you don't need any eclasses because most of the tutorials you need are covered by the team in either video or written tutorials paid for by Microsoft.  So check the thread below to get started but you will need Exam specific books and test prep software when you are ready to certify for either MCTS or MCPD.  This will get you started.


    http://forums.msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/CertGeneral/thread/3714b750-e5ae-452f-9f17-7b385a5d89e5


    Asp.net MVP, MCPD Web C#, MCITP BI & MCTS SQL Server 2005
    Monday, June 30, 2008 7:27 PM
  • There are also "Prerequisites" listed on the course pages as well. That, along with the "Audience" section should give you a clear path as to where to start.
    Michael D. Alligood, MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+ www.theitclassroom.com
    Monday, June 30, 2008 7:52 PM
  • Scott-

    You might want to try the Microsoft Beginner Developer Learning Center before the E-Learning if you are looking for more of a foundation before progressing to whichever path you like better.

    Dave
    Monday, June 30, 2008 8:22 PM
    Answerer
  •  Hi Mr.Alligood

    I have worked in It since 2003. Was a MOUS teacher, and also PC technician. i can say it was basic level

    And i took CCNA in 2005 and MCP in configuring active directory in 03 server, but i didnt take the certification test in Both cases.

    i am looking to a New start, since i have the ability to certify now. I am Planning to do

    first MCDST, then MCITP and  for a start. do u think i am heading the right way Master?
    Your advice will be most welcome

    Wednesday, September 10, 2008 2:20 PM
  • If you have efficiently researched and planned your goals and sticking to that plan, then you are heading in the right direction. Sounds a little generic, right? Let me explain. Only you know what you are passionate about doing in the I.T. field. And hopefully that passion has led your research to pursue the correct path. If you are looking into desktop support, I hope you haven't researched developing certifications from Microsoft! Furthermore, it helps to get a feel for your community to see if your demographical area can support another I.T. support technician. Meaning, if the city you live in is saturated with support technicians, you may have a hard time finding gainful employment. It is always a good idea to know your surroundings and your place in it.

    Follow my mantra: Start. Research. Plan. Perform. Finish. Test. Evaluate. 

    It is not enough to just researched the certification you wish to achieve, you have to research it's impact on your surroundings. Certifications do not equal employment. Research the average salary for your desired position - while paying special attention for important variables such as years of experience. The most common mistake a individual new to the I.T. field makes is seeing some generic salary survey that states a MCITP: Consumer Support Technician's average salary is $97,000 + annually (Yes, Redmond Magazine that was a jab at you.) This is totally an unrealistic number for a person with little experience but holds this certification. It is unrealistic even for a person with experience who holds this certification in my opinion, but I disgress.

    Talk to people in your desired field. Ask them questions. Interview them. Because I will tell you this; there is nothing more depressing than investing time, money and energy into something you thought was a great decision for your future only to find out you hate performing the duties that utimately came with the position and you didn't perform the necessary research you should have.

    Anyway, I hope that helps.


    Michael D. Alligood,
    MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+

    The I.T. Classroom Blog
    Start. Research. Plan. Perform. End. Test. Evaluate.
    Thursday, September 11, 2008 8:58 PM