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Reinstalling windows 7 OEM on different motherboard RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have recently assembled a new computer for myself, but I found that the dvd drive attached to my old computer was not compatible with my motherboard

    I thought that maybe I could put my new hard drive into my old machine, and install windows 7 on the new hard drive using the old machine.  This didn't work.  (I now understand that this was a bad idea, and I don't need people in this thread to be reminding me of that).

    I have since cleaned the drive that had windows 7 installed on it.  I have also bought a new DVD drive that should be compatible with the new motherboard.

     

    My question is: Can I still install windows 7 on the new machine once the DVD drive arrives?  I'm under the impression that I might have to call Microsoft to do this.

    Wednesday, February 1, 2012 5:58 PM

Answers

  • Well, the fact of the matter is that I did indeed get Windows 7 installed on my new machine with my product key. 

    On the first(mistaken) installation I had to enter the product key to get it to work, but I don't think that necessaraly means that It was activated.  My system wouldn't run Explorer for me on the mistaken installation, so it's no stretch that it wasn't able to actually send the activation information off to microsoft.

    But ultimately, windows 7 installed and RAN(albeit with limited effect) on the first(mistaken) system, and it installed, ran and SUCCESSFULLY ACTIVATED on the system that the software was purchased for.

    So, could moderators please stop marking "you can't do it" as the answer, because those answers are incorrect.

    Tuesday, February 7, 2012 6:01 PM

All replies

  • "Samuel_Schoenberg" wrote in message news:9318294c-7045-4f97-bc3c-df49480999cb...

    I have recently assembled a new computer for myself, but I found that the dvd drive attached to my old computer was not compatible with my motherboard

    I thought that maybe I could put my new hard drive into my old machine, and install windows 7 on the new hard drive using the old machine.  This didn't work.  (I now understand that this was a bad idea, and I don't need people in this thread to be reminding me of that).

    I have since cleaned the drive that had windows 7 installed on it.  I have also bought a new DVD drive that should be compatible with the new motherboard.

     

    My question is: Can I still install windows 7 on the new machine once the DVD drive arrives?  I'm under the impression that I might have to call Microsoft to do this.

     
    OEM licenses for Windows CANNOT be transferred from one machine to another under any circumstances.

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Wednesday, February 1, 2012 6:11 PM
    Moderator
  • No.  The Microsoft OEM FAQs state in pertinent part:

    Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required.

    You need to purchase a full license copy of Windows and reinstall.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Wednesday, February 1, 2012 7:54 PM
    Answerer
  • I know that mods don't think it reflects good on the forum if there are a lot of unanswered threads, but I'll mark a "you can't do it response" response as the answer Only after I've given up on trying to get windows 7 installed on my pc, and that won't be until Friday night this week at the very least.
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 3:29 AM
  • Darin Smith of Microsoft marked the answers because there is no other.  Changing a motherboard to one that is not the manufacturer's warranty replacement part invalidates an OEM SLP license.  The motherboard must have specific codes in the BIOS on the motherboard in order for an OEM SLP copy to activate.  A different motherboard either has the wrong codes or, in the case of retail boards, none.  The license is specific to the original motherboard and edition of Windows because the license is issued to the user by the manufacturer, not Microsoft.  Your OEM End User License Agreement opens with this statement:

    These license terms are an agreement between you and

    · the computer manufacturer that distributes the software with the computer, or

    · the software installer that distributes the software with the computer.

    The manufacturer isn't about to allow his license to be transferred. 

    Retail licenses are issued to the user by Microsoft.  A Retail Windows license opens with this statement:

    These license terms are an agreement between Microsoft Corporation (or based on where you live, one of its affiliates) and you.

    Only retail licenses can be moved from one motherboard to a different motherboard. 


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Thursday, February 2, 2012 3:51 AM
    Answerer
  • I just re-read Samuel's original post and I am not sure he is trying to install an OEM Windows (from an old PC) on a new PC.

     

    Samuel_Schorenberg: would you explain further were the Windows 7, that you want to install on the new PC, came from?

    Is it from another PC or is it a brand new copy of Windows?

    If it is from another PC, how did you originally get that copy of Windows 7, was it per-installed on that other PC or was it purchased separately?

     

    Thank you,

     


    Darin MS


    Thursday, February 2, 2012 11:27 PM
  • I got it from newegg.com:  http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116992

     

    i did indeed get it activated on my new computer, but to be fair, I don't know if it actually got activated when i tried to install it using the old computer.

    Saturday, February 4, 2012 3:01 AM
  • Thank you for clarifying with the link.  The link you have provided is for an OEM System Builder pack.  Please read the information on the Details tab just below the stock photo of the item, which says:

    Use of this OEM System Builder Channel software is subject to the terms of the Microsoft OEM System Builder License. This software is intended for pre-installation on a new personal computer for resale. This OEM System Builder Channel software requires the assembler to provide end user support for the Windows software and cannot be transferred to another computer once it is installed. To acquire Windows software with support provided by Microsoft please see our full package "Retail" product offerings.

    So the question becomes are you reinstalling on the original motherboard or on the new motherboard you mention in your original post?  If is not the same motherboard you originally installed on then it is not valid to install it.  Microsoft defines the motherboard as the computer for licensing purposes so think of it this way; the motherboard owns an OEM license, you own a retail license.  That is why you cannot transfer an OEM copy to a new computer but you can transfer a retail copy.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Saturday, February 4, 2012 3:22 AM
    Answerer
  • You sound like what i'd expect from customer support before escalations.  You'd be surprised how many times a company tells you that you "can't do that" and you end up doing it anyway. 
    Saturday, February 4, 2012 5:35 PM
  • All I can tell you is that the license says what it says.  The System Builder license defines a system builder and a person who builds a computer for his own use is not included.

    'System Builder' means an original equipment manufacturer, an assembler, a refurbisher, or a software pre-installer that sells the Customer System(s) to a third party.

    In this case there is no escalation that will lead to a Microsoft staffer who says "it's OK to install OEM software on your own computer."  What you are suggesting is that moral equivalency (justifying bad behavior by citing other's bad behavior) makes it OK.  I'm sure that you don't want to do that. 


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Saturday, February 4, 2012 6:15 PM
    Answerer
  • Well, the fact of the matter is that I did indeed get Windows 7 installed on my new machine with my product key. 

    On the first(mistaken) installation I had to enter the product key to get it to work, but I don't think that necessaraly means that It was activated.  My system wouldn't run Explorer for me on the mistaken installation, so it's no stretch that it wasn't able to actually send the activation information off to microsoft.

    But ultimately, windows 7 installed and RAN(albeit with limited effect) on the first(mistaken) system, and it installed, ran and SUCCESSFULLY ACTIVATED on the system that the software was purchased for.

    So, could moderators please stop marking "you can't do it" as the answer, because those answers are incorrect.

    Tuesday, February 7, 2012 6:01 PM
  • They were marked as answers because with the information we had available at the time, they were the correct answers.

    Your statements were sufficiently unclear that no-one could be sure as to the xact sequence of events, and you at no time stated that you had not activated the prior install - had you done so, the response would have been different.

    Since you object to the moderators marking anything as an answer, please do so yourself - even if it's your own response above.


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Tuesday, February 7, 2012 6:11 PM
    Moderator