locked
Stereo Mix RRS feed

  • Question

  • It would be great if Songsmith could generate chords for existing vocals/music using stereo mix. I use Audacity and when I want to record a song from the internet, for example, I don't play the song on the speaker and let Audacity record the song from the speaker; I use stereo mix feature of Audacity to record the song so that the recorded sound is as clear/good quality as "what I hear". I can hear the song from the internet while it is being recorded by Audacity internally.

    I am generating melodies using melody generating softwares and then playing the generated melodies on the speaker and letting Songsmith generate chords for them. However, what I would prefer is for Audacity to get stereo mix/"what you hear" quality sound so that it can get accurate frequencies of the sound and, therefore, generate accurate chords for the sound since the sound played through speaker may not be as accurate as stereo mix due to environmental/ambient sound interference and also due to speaker qualities (poor frequency response). As to syncing, since you will be able to hear both the Songsmith metronome and the input sound (wav, midi, ect.), you would be able to sync the sound to the metronome. 


    Ermias





    Thursday, January 29, 2015 11:44 PM

Answers

  • Great suggestion, and glad you're interested in Songsmith.

    You're absolutely right that Songsmith is designed for interactive use, not for working with previously-recorded melodies, so I don't have an easy solution for you. I'll give you a few ideas, though... but recognize that none of these are what I'd call a "good experience", just some ideas to play around with in this scenario that's a bit outside what Songsmith was designed for.

    1) What you're doing is not as bad as you think... Songsmith's idea of a melody is really just the *main* frequency at every time instant, which is almost guaranteed not to change if you replay an existing recording through speakers.  Even if the *tone* of the new recording sounds off to your ears, Songsmith is almost definitely still seeing exactly the same notes.

    2) Rather than using a microphone to re-record audio, you can record it via a physical loopback wire, or - if your sound cards supports a "what you hear" input - through your soundcard's "what you hear" channel.  This is still clunkier than it would be if we had an "import" feature, but you'll lose little or no fidelity this way, and you definitely won't lose any information that affects the chords Songsmith generates (because, again, Songsmith doesn't care about the fine details of tone, only the one and only main frequency at any given instant).

    The big concern with either of these approaches is, as you mentioned, synchronization; this only works if your original recording is at a known tempo and you set Songsmith to exactly the same tempo.  If you're generating melodies in software, though, this might not be an issue (since your original melody probably *is* at a known, fixed tempo).

    The last idea I'll mention is that in an old forum post, I mentioned that you *can* actually open up a Songsmith file and swap in a new audio file.  It's clunky and not really supported, but it works. :)  See this thread for details:

    https://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/9d6d090f-3510-42f4-9e3c-dc2f983f599f/chord-generation-migrated-from-communityresearchmicrosoftcom?forum=songsmith

    Sorry we don't have a more elegant solution for this particular scenario.

    Good luck, and happy Songsmith'ing!

    -Dan from the Songsmith team

    Friday, January 30, 2015 2:22 AM
    Owner

All replies

  • Great suggestion, and glad you're interested in Songsmith.

    You're absolutely right that Songsmith is designed for interactive use, not for working with previously-recorded melodies, so I don't have an easy solution for you. I'll give you a few ideas, though... but recognize that none of these are what I'd call a "good experience", just some ideas to play around with in this scenario that's a bit outside what Songsmith was designed for.

    1) What you're doing is not as bad as you think... Songsmith's idea of a melody is really just the *main* frequency at every time instant, which is almost guaranteed not to change if you replay an existing recording through speakers.  Even if the *tone* of the new recording sounds off to your ears, Songsmith is almost definitely still seeing exactly the same notes.

    2) Rather than using a microphone to re-record audio, you can record it via a physical loopback wire, or - if your sound cards supports a "what you hear" input - through your soundcard's "what you hear" channel.  This is still clunkier than it would be if we had an "import" feature, but you'll lose little or no fidelity this way, and you definitely won't lose any information that affects the chords Songsmith generates (because, again, Songsmith doesn't care about the fine details of tone, only the one and only main frequency at any given instant).

    The big concern with either of these approaches is, as you mentioned, synchronization; this only works if your original recording is at a known tempo and you set Songsmith to exactly the same tempo.  If you're generating melodies in software, though, this might not be an issue (since your original melody probably *is* at a known, fixed tempo).

    The last idea I'll mention is that in an old forum post, I mentioned that you *can* actually open up a Songsmith file and swap in a new audio file.  It's clunky and not really supported, but it works. :)  See this thread for details:

    https://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/9d6d090f-3510-42f4-9e3c-dc2f983f599f/chord-generation-migrated-from-communityresearchmicrosoftcom?forum=songsmith

    Sorry we don't have a more elegant solution for this particular scenario.

    Good luck, and happy Songsmith'ing!

    -Dan from the Songsmith team

    Friday, January 30, 2015 2:22 AM
    Owner
  • Thanks Dan for the clarification and for the link :). 


    Ermias

    Friday, January 30, 2015 3:17 AM