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SSD Primary Drive and TRIM is it Possible? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm contemplating using an Intel x25-m 80Gb SSD as the Primary Drive in an iminent WHS build, but I'm not so sure 80Gb would do the trick or should I be thinking larger?  As well with the Intel Toolbox v1.1 supporting TRIM for this drive on XP and Vista by running the application manually or through scheduler would this work now on WHS as well?

    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
    Saturday, December 12, 2009 4:52 AM

Answers

  • It would be possible, but I don't see the benefit given the currently still high prices of such disks.
    The system drive usually is not the bottleneck in the WHS performance, and while the risk to have the disk fail is smaller, recovery after a real failure will be much harder and the protection against other reasons, that the OS goes down like a random crash or a memory error during write processes is as bad as with a normal disk.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    • Proposed as answer by Ken WarrenModerator Sunday, December 13, 2009 4:55 AM
    • Marked as answer by lordfoul Monday, December 14, 2009 8:15 PM
    Saturday, December 12, 2009 1:53 PM
    Moderator
  • Most consumer-grade SSDs are MLC, not SLC. If reliability is your goal, the latter is a better choice, but expensive.

    As Olaf replied, there's probably little benefit, at least in the current version of WHS. If the next version incorporates improvements found in Win7, using an SSD in WHS may become beneficial, and cheaper.

    I'm not an expert in this topic by any stretch of the imagination. I simply had an interest in using an SSD in WHS and researched it a bit. My interest was more towards "how low can you go" in terms of WHS power consumption, without adversely affecting the performance I wanted, for my uses of WHS.

    You can easily find relevant information on line by searching for "SSD Win7" and "SLC MLC SSD comparison".

    Chris

    • Marked as answer by lordfoul Monday, December 14, 2009 8:15 PM
    Sunday, December 13, 2009 6:37 PM
  • More reliable? Yes, may be. They have not those moving parts. But also the chips used for forming a flash drive may develop issues, be it due to overheating, due to writing too often into the same cell etc. As almost each new technology they have not only benefits, but also their drawbacks. Especially in cooperation with older software there may be additional drawbacks (I did experiment with a 16 GB drive and Windows XP a while ago, and this was not as reliable and performant as I did hope).
    The most recovery tools are designed with the aim of recovering stuff from disks, using well known physical structures. I may be wrong but I assume, that many of these tools are not yet available for flash drives, which have a different structure.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    • Marked as answer by lordfoul Monday, December 14, 2009 8:15 PM
    Monday, December 14, 2009 11:15 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • It would be possible, but I don't see the benefit given the currently still high prices of such disks.
    The system drive usually is not the bottleneck in the WHS performance, and while the risk to have the disk fail is smaller, recovery after a real failure will be much harder and the protection against other reasons, that the OS goes down like a random crash or a memory error during write processes is as bad as with a normal disk.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    • Proposed as answer by Ken WarrenModerator Sunday, December 13, 2009 4:55 AM
    • Marked as answer by lordfoul Monday, December 14, 2009 8:15 PM
    Saturday, December 12, 2009 1:53 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the reply Olaf. 

    I was thinking that the SSD would be a more reliable drive than a spindle based drive, am I mistaken?  How would recovery from a failed SSD complicate recovery over a spindle based drive?  I'm not really worried about the cost it seems reasonable to me if there are real benefits to be had.  Is there a better way to guard against a boot drive failure?  What would best practices be in anticipation of an inevitable WHS boot drive failure to ensure ease of recovery?

    Again any assistance is appreciated.
    Sunday, December 13, 2009 1:59 AM
  • Most consumer-grade SSDs are MLC, not SLC. If reliability is your goal, the latter is a better choice, but expensive.

    As Olaf replied, there's probably little benefit, at least in the current version of WHS. If the next version incorporates improvements found in Win7, using an SSD in WHS may become beneficial, and cheaper.

    I'm not an expert in this topic by any stretch of the imagination. I simply had an interest in using an SSD in WHS and researched it a bit. My interest was more towards "how low can you go" in terms of WHS power consumption, without adversely affecting the performance I wanted, for my uses of WHS.

    You can easily find relevant information on line by searching for "SSD Win7" and "SLC MLC SSD comparison".

    Chris

    • Marked as answer by lordfoul Monday, December 14, 2009 8:15 PM
    Sunday, December 13, 2009 6:37 PM
  • More reliable? Yes, may be. They have not those moving parts. But also the chips used for forming a flash drive may develop issues, be it due to overheating, due to writing too often into the same cell etc. As almost each new technology they have not only benefits, but also their drawbacks. Especially in cooperation with older software there may be additional drawbacks (I did experiment with a 16 GB drive and Windows XP a while ago, and this was not as reliable and performant as I did hope).
    The most recovery tools are designed with the aim of recovering stuff from disks, using well known physical structures. I may be wrong but I assume, that many of these tools are not yet available for flash drives, which have a different structure.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    • Marked as answer by lordfoul Monday, December 14, 2009 8:15 PM
    Monday, December 14, 2009 11:15 AM
    Moderator