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Windows 7 Restore RRS feed

  • Question

  • C:\program files\windows home server\clientrestorewizard.exe is a cool fast way to do a restore of a machine that you can't get to restore the normal way.

    As you know Windows 7 creates a 100MB hidden partition. While using a Windows 7 PC to do this type of restore of a Windows 7 PC I got to the point of selecting which image to restore and to what hard drive to restore it to. What I didn't know is where is WHS going to put this restore of the 100MB partition. Is it going to put it on the selected restore drive or is it going to put it on the host Windows 7 drive partition? I ask because WHS doesn't give you the option of where to point the hidden partition. Does anyone know the answer to this?

    If WHS wants to replace the host OS 100MB partition we got a problem doing this kind of restore on a Windows 7 machine!

    fasthair
    Sunday, November 8, 2009 1:23 AM

Answers

  • I got to the same point you did trying to restore a Windows 7 client HD.  I picked the 100MB partition to restore first and then restored the main partition.  That is not the correct way to do it since it just wrote over the 100MB partition.  However, it worked out since the 100MB partition is only needed if you plan to use the BitLocker Drive Encryption feature.  I did have to run a repair from the Windows 7 CD first before it would boot-up.

    If you want to keep the 100MB partition, there's an extra step involved during the restore.  After restoring the 100MB partition, make the 100MB partition active by right-clicking on the partition in Disk Management and choose "Mark partition as Active".  Then restore the main partition.

    Your original question: Is it going to put it on the selected restore drive or is it going to put it on the host Windows 7 drive partition? It's treated like any other partition (example if you had a "C" and "D" partition) and is put on the restore drive.  There are just extra steps involved as noted above to get both partitions restored.

    • Proposed as answer by kariya21Moderator Sunday, November 8, 2009 11:45 PM
    • Marked as answer by fasthair Monday, November 9, 2009 11:31 PM
    Sunday, November 8, 2009 4:01 PM

All replies

  • I got to the same point you did trying to restore a Windows 7 client HD.  I picked the 100MB partition to restore first and then restored the main partition.  That is not the correct way to do it since it just wrote over the 100MB partition.  However, it worked out since the 100MB partition is only needed if you plan to use the BitLocker Drive Encryption feature.  I did have to run a repair from the Windows 7 CD first before it would boot-up.

    If you want to keep the 100MB partition, there's an extra step involved during the restore.  After restoring the 100MB partition, make the 100MB partition active by right-clicking on the partition in Disk Management and choose "Mark partition as Active".  Then restore the main partition.

    Your original question: Is it going to put it on the selected restore drive or is it going to put it on the host Windows 7 drive partition? It's treated like any other partition (example if you had a "C" and "D" partition) and is put on the restore drive.  There are just extra steps involved as noted above to get both partitions restored.

    • Proposed as answer by kariya21Moderator Sunday, November 8, 2009 11:45 PM
    • Marked as answer by fasthair Monday, November 9, 2009 11:31 PM
    Sunday, November 8, 2009 4:01 PM
  • I just put up another post with the same question. It makes it more difficult for the casual WHS user to do a retore. Can Win 7 run without the reserve partition for sure?
    Laser Tech
    Monday, November 23, 2009 9:00 PM