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  • Question

  • hi i have a problem. my old computer went wrong so i have brought a second hand tower but it has a pirate copy of window xp pro.i have already brought a genuine copy of windows xp home editon. as the hard drive was the problem on the old computer i was wondering if i can register the pruduct key on the hard drive of the second hand computer.or have i have to have the hard drive reformatted any info will be much welcome

    thanks alot steve 

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 12:18 PM

Answers

  • Steve Osman,

     

    First, let's try to determine something about your original Windows installation on the now-defunct computer.

     

    Please look on the computer, or with the materials you received with the computer or with your retail purchase of  Windows, to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticity (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another version of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 12:26 PM
  • hi dan first off its windows home edition

                second it reads oem software

                   thirdly no computer manufactures name is on it

    by the way the window home edition was brought seprately from the now defunct computer

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 12:47 PM
  • Steve Osman,

     

    Thanks for the info.  Can you tell me if there is a Certificate of Authenticity on the replacement second hand computer you purchased, or any other indication that it may have come from its maker with Windows installed?  Is the second hand computer a no-name computer or is it a brand name computer?

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 3:46 PM
  • hi dan there is no certificate of authenticity on the second hand computer as it comes up with "you may be a victim of conterfiting" when you start the computer and the computer is not a brand name computer cheers steve
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 7:12 PM
  •  steve osman wrote:

    hi i have a problem. my old computer went wrong so i have brought a second hand tower but it has a pirate copy of window xp pro.i have already brought a genuine copy of windows xp home editon. as the hard drive was the problem on the old computer i was wondering if i can register the pruduct key on the hard drive of the second hand computer.or have i have to have the hard drive reformatted any info will be much welcome

    thanks alot steve



    If you are saying that you just want to change the key over on the XP Pro, no home edition and XP Pro editions are different and very in costs so in that case you would need to reinstall XP with your Home Edition CD. If its different then I have stated here please explain your situation unless others assistance has helped you with solving your issue.

    Regards,

    Josh
    Support Specialist
    Client Services Division
    Mwest International Services LTD.
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 8:49 PM
  • Steve Osman,

     

    OEM licenses for XP, such as the license on your now-defunct original computer, are tied to the computer onto which they are first installed and are not permitted by the End User Licensing Agreement to be moved to or installed on any other computer.  Once that original computer is "retired" and no longer in service, the OEM license "expires" with the original computer.

     

    However, just because a computer breaks does not mean that you "lose your license" for XP.  The restrictions on the OEM license do allow you to repair an inoperatrive computer up to and including the replacement of the computer's base component, the motherboard.  So, for example, if you were to use parts from the newly acquired but nongenine computer to repair the old computer, you would still be able to use your existing OEM license.  If one of the parts repaired was the motherboard, you would most likely have to do a Telephonic Activation of XP.

     

    The restriction on the OEM license that prohibits transfering the license to another computer, unfortunately, is what will be preventing you from simply installing your existing OEM license on your newly purchased second-hand computer.  If your original computer had a full retail license for XP installed on it, you would be well within your EULA rights to move the license from the old computer to the newly acquired but nongenuine computer.

     

    Your options for "Getting Genuine" on you newly acquired computer include participating in the Genuien Windows Offer and purchasing a WGA Kit, purchasing a full retail license for the edition of XP desired at a trusted local or online retail store, or purchasing another OEM license for the edition of XP desired at a trusted local or online retail store.

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 11:59 PM

All replies

  • Steve Osman,

     

    First, let's try to determine something about your original Windows installation on the now-defunct computer.

     

    Please look on the computer, or with the materials you received with the computer or with your retail purchase of  Windows, to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticity (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another version of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 12:26 PM
  • hi dan first off its windows home edition

                second it reads oem software

                   thirdly no computer manufactures name is on it

    by the way the window home edition was brought seprately from the now defunct computer

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 12:47 PM
  • Steve Osman,

     

    Thanks for the info.  Can you tell me if there is a Certificate of Authenticity on the replacement second hand computer you purchased, or any other indication that it may have come from its maker with Windows installed?  Is the second hand computer a no-name computer or is it a brand name computer?

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 3:46 PM
  • hi dan there is no certificate of authenticity on the second hand computer as it comes up with "you may be a victim of conterfiting" when you start the computer and the computer is not a brand name computer cheers steve
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 7:12 PM
  •  steve osman wrote:

    hi i have a problem. my old computer went wrong so i have brought a second hand tower but it has a pirate copy of window xp pro.i have already brought a genuine copy of windows xp home editon. as the hard drive was the problem on the old computer i was wondering if i can register the pruduct key on the hard drive of the second hand computer.or have i have to have the hard drive reformatted any info will be much welcome

    thanks alot steve



    If you are saying that you just want to change the key over on the XP Pro, no home edition and XP Pro editions are different and very in costs so in that case you would need to reinstall XP with your Home Edition CD. If its different then I have stated here please explain your situation unless others assistance has helped you with solving your issue.

    Regards,

    Josh
    Support Specialist
    Client Services Division
    Mwest International Services LTD.
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 8:49 PM
  • Steve Osman,

     

    OEM licenses for XP, such as the license on your now-defunct original computer, are tied to the computer onto which they are first installed and are not permitted by the End User Licensing Agreement to be moved to or installed on any other computer.  Once that original computer is "retired" and no longer in service, the OEM license "expires" with the original computer.

     

    However, just because a computer breaks does not mean that you "lose your license" for XP.  The restrictions on the OEM license do allow you to repair an inoperatrive computer up to and including the replacement of the computer's base component, the motherboard.  So, for example, if you were to use parts from the newly acquired but nongenine computer to repair the old computer, you would still be able to use your existing OEM license.  If one of the parts repaired was the motherboard, you would most likely have to do a Telephonic Activation of XP.

     

    The restriction on the OEM license that prohibits transfering the license to another computer, unfortunately, is what will be preventing you from simply installing your existing OEM license on your newly purchased second-hand computer.  If your original computer had a full retail license for XP installed on it, you would be well within your EULA rights to move the license from the old computer to the newly acquired but nongenuine computer.

     

    Your options for "Getting Genuine" on you newly acquired computer include participating in the Genuien Windows Offer and purchasing a WGA Kit, purchasing a full retail license for the edition of XP desired at a trusted local or online retail store, or purchasing another OEM license for the edition of XP desired at a trusted local or online retail store.

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 11:59 PM