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change the Windows XP or Windows 2000 boot screen RRS feed

Answers

  • install resouce hacker

     

    Start Resource Hacker.
    From the file menu, select Open.
    Navigate to the \%systemroot%\system32 folder (e.g., c:\windows\system32) and select ntoskrnl.exe.
    From the File menu, select Save As and enter a name of ntoskrmd.exe (now you can safely edit the new file without risk of damaging the original file).
    Expand the Bitmap folder in the left-hand pane, expand item 1, and select item 1033.
    From the Action menu, select "Save [ Bitmap : 1 : 1033]".
    Enter a location and name to use to save the existing bitmap, then click Save (keep Resource Hacker open and running on your system).
    Start Paint Shop Pro and load the bitmap you just saved. (If you're modifying an XP boot screen, you'll see only a black image; if you're modifying a Win2K boot screen, skip to step 11).
    From the Colors menu, select Load Palette.
    Load the 16.pal file (i.e., the viewable palette file) you downloaded and ensure you've selected "Maintain indexes" under the "Apply palette using" section. After you load the viewable palette, the boot screen bitmap will appear on screen.
    Modify the boot screen bitmap as you desire.
    If you're modifying an XP boot screen, after you finish modifying the bitmap, select Load Palette from the Colors menu, then load the win.pal file (i.e., the Windows palette file) you downloaded. The screen will go black again. If you're modifying a Win2K boot screen, continue to the next step.
    Save the bitmap file and close your paint program.
    Back in Resource Hacker, ensure that you still have the 1 under Bitmap selected (from step 5).
    From the Action menu, select Replace Bitmap.
    Press the "Open file with new bitmap" button.
    Select the new bitmap you created, then click Open.
    On the Replace dialog box, ensure that bitmap 1 is selected, then click Replace.
    From the File menu, click Save.
    Go to Start, Run, and type
    cmd.exe
    to open a command prompt.
    Navigate to the root of the C: drive by typing
    c:
    cd \
    So that you can edit the file, modify the boot.ini file attributes by typing
    attrib boot.ini -r -s -h
    Edit boot.ini, copy your current Windows start line to a new entry with a modified kernel to create a modified boot option, then save. For example, you would change
      [boot loader]
      timeout=5
      default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
      [operating systems]
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
      Professional" /fastdetect
    to
      [boot loader]
      timeout=5
      default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
      [operating systems]
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
      Professional" /fastdetect
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
      Professional Modified Start Screen" /fastdetect /kernel=ntoskrmd.exe
    Reset the boot.ini attributes to their default state by typing
    attrib boot.ini +r +s +h
    Reboot the machine and select the modified boot option you just created to view your modified boot screen. If the boot process fails, select the unmodified boot option.

    After you're happy with your modified boot screen, you can change the boot.ini file to include only the modified boot entry with the /kernel option. For example,

      [boot loader]
      timeout=5
      default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
      [operating systems]
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
      Professional Modified Start Screen" /fastdetect /kernel=ntoskrmd.exe

    Be aware that if you apply a service pack or a hotfix and you continue to use the modified ntoskrnl.exe file, the fixes you apply won't go into effect and you might experience compatibility problems. Should this happen, you can manually replace the standard ntoskrnl.exe file with the modified version by booting into the Recovery Console or by pressing F8 during the boot process to boot into "Safe mode command prompt." If you use either method, you'll boot to a command prompt where you can overwrite the standard ntoskrnl.exe. If a service pack or hotfix replaces ntoskrnl.exe, you'll need to modify the new ntoskrnl.exe file supplied with the fix to restore your modified boot screen.

    You can use Resource Hacker to explore the other bitmaps you can change. Just be sure you always have an alternative boot option and that you don't change the original ntoskrnl.exe while experimenting. For example, bitmap 8 for XP is the three progress bars that scroll across the screen during the boot process (you can change this bitmap by following the steps I outlined above and substituting bitmap 1 for bitmap 8).

    A few words of warning. I've noticed that when I edit a bitmap in Paint Shop Pro and save the image under a different name, the new picture is a different size. As a result, when I insert the image into ntoskrnl.exe and attempt to boot the system, the boot process fails and displays an error message indicating that the system can't find ntoskrnl.exe. You must save the bitmap image over the existing file that you used Resource Hacker to expor

     

    Sunday, September 16, 2007 4:49 PM

All replies

  • install resouce hacker

     

    Start Resource Hacker.
    From the file menu, select Open.
    Navigate to the \%systemroot%\system32 folder (e.g., c:\windows\system32) and select ntoskrnl.exe.
    From the File menu, select Save As and enter a name of ntoskrmd.exe (now you can safely edit the new file without risk of damaging the original file).
    Expand the Bitmap folder in the left-hand pane, expand item 1, and select item 1033.
    From the Action menu, select "Save [ Bitmap : 1 : 1033]".
    Enter a location and name to use to save the existing bitmap, then click Save (keep Resource Hacker open and running on your system).
    Start Paint Shop Pro and load the bitmap you just saved. (If you're modifying an XP boot screen, you'll see only a black image; if you're modifying a Win2K boot screen, skip to step 11).
    From the Colors menu, select Load Palette.
    Load the 16.pal file (i.e., the viewable palette file) you downloaded and ensure you've selected "Maintain indexes" under the "Apply palette using" section. After you load the viewable palette, the boot screen bitmap will appear on screen.
    Modify the boot screen bitmap as you desire.
    If you're modifying an XP boot screen, after you finish modifying the bitmap, select Load Palette from the Colors menu, then load the win.pal file (i.e., the Windows palette file) you downloaded. The screen will go black again. If you're modifying a Win2K boot screen, continue to the next step.
    Save the bitmap file and close your paint program.
    Back in Resource Hacker, ensure that you still have the 1 under Bitmap selected (from step 5).
    From the Action menu, select Replace Bitmap.
    Press the "Open file with new bitmap" button.
    Select the new bitmap you created, then click Open.
    On the Replace dialog box, ensure that bitmap 1 is selected, then click Replace.
    From the File menu, click Save.
    Go to Start, Run, and type
    cmd.exe
    to open a command prompt.
    Navigate to the root of the C: drive by typing
    c:
    cd \
    So that you can edit the file, modify the boot.ini file attributes by typing
    attrib boot.ini -r -s -h
    Edit boot.ini, copy your current Windows start line to a new entry with a modified kernel to create a modified boot option, then save. For example, you would change
      [boot loader]
      timeout=5
      default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
      [operating systems]
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
      Professional" /fastdetect
    to
      [boot loader]
      timeout=5
      default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
      [operating systems]
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
      Professional" /fastdetect
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
      Professional Modified Start Screen" /fastdetect /kernel=ntoskrmd.exe
    Reset the boot.ini attributes to their default state by typing
    attrib boot.ini +r +s +h
    Reboot the machine and select the modified boot option you just created to view your modified boot screen. If the boot process fails, select the unmodified boot option.

    After you're happy with your modified boot screen, you can change the boot.ini file to include only the modified boot entry with the /kernel option. For example,

      [boot loader]
      timeout=5
      default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
      [operating systems]
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
      Professional Modified Start Screen" /fastdetect /kernel=ntoskrmd.exe

    Be aware that if you apply a service pack or a hotfix and you continue to use the modified ntoskrnl.exe file, the fixes you apply won't go into effect and you might experience compatibility problems. Should this happen, you can manually replace the standard ntoskrnl.exe file with the modified version by booting into the Recovery Console or by pressing F8 during the boot process to boot into "Safe mode command prompt." If you use either method, you'll boot to a command prompt where you can overwrite the standard ntoskrnl.exe. If a service pack or hotfix replaces ntoskrnl.exe, you'll need to modify the new ntoskrnl.exe file supplied with the fix to restore your modified boot screen.

    You can use Resource Hacker to explore the other bitmaps you can change. Just be sure you always have an alternative boot option and that you don't change the original ntoskrnl.exe while experimenting. For example, bitmap 8 for XP is the three progress bars that scroll across the screen during the boot process (you can change this bitmap by following the steps I outlined above and substituting bitmap 1 for bitmap 8).

    A few words of warning. I've noticed that when I edit a bitmap in Paint Shop Pro and save the image under a different name, the new picture is a different size. As a result, when I insert the image into ntoskrnl.exe and attempt to boot the system, the boot process fails and displays an error message indicating that the system can't find ntoskrnl.exe. You must save the bitmap image over the existing file that you used Resource Hacker to expor

     

    Sunday, September 16, 2007 4:49 PM
  • Forgive me for bieng a little skeptical, but there are 5 posts from bo_boys and all have been answered by Narayanan. What is even more odd, is that every reply was marked as an answer.

     

    But then again, it could be a coincident, so i hope i am forgiven if wrong. I hope we all remember, that forum points are not dependent on 'Top Answerers' ranking.

     

    Sunday, September 16, 2007 8:22 PM
  • Don`t try to do this.

    This wil slow ur computer very much..

    If u r very anxious just change the wallpapers leave the windows to microsoft.

     

     

    Monday, September 17, 2007 6:17 AM
  • U may try Tune Up utilities

     

    that is the best way to change the boot screen with out any hack to XP

     

    Plz avoid Resource Hacker  that might be dangerous............

    Friday, October 19, 2007 8:11 AM
  •  

    tell me y iwant to do tht .. n destroy my machine??
    Tuesday, December 4, 2007 4:00 AM
  • Why is Resource Hacker dangerous? It worked safe for me and I edited the ORIGINAL file, likey, I the guide says not to. Actually I messed it up by making it 256 colors instead of 16, I just pulled out my XP cd and went into the recovery console to fix it. Tune Up and Stardock is for n00bz.
    Saturday, April 10, 2010 1:50 PM