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Going back to "school" - where to start? RRS feed

  • Question

  • It is an exciting time for me - I have an opportunity to re-train and update my developer skills, and I'm looking for some input to help me get some focus! I have only a few questions.  

    Looking at the market and trying to match to my interests & experience (I wrote business software - inventory, billing, etc., on IBM mini-computers for many years), it seems that developing Windows store apps is a good field to train for. I see no reason NOT to learn and take certification exams for C# as well as HTML/CSS & Javascript.  Reading a little about Windows 10, and how we will soon develop once for all Microsoft platforms, it makes me wonder:

    1) Which certification best prepares me for the future (ie. finding jobs as a developer) with Windows 10 and mobile apps:  MCSD-Windows Store Apps, or MCSD-Web Apps? 

    2) Using Xamarin looks like a great (marketable) skill to develop, since it claims to allow a developer to write a C# mobile app, and then convert the code for iOS and Android. The basic Xamarin Studio dev environment is free to download.  Do you agree that this looks like a valuable tool to learn for the coming years?

    3) Given the current issues (almost a crisis, it seems) with hacking and security, and also having seen a number of jobs in my area that are looking for developers with encryption experience, it seems that it would be worthwhile to study the AES standard and get proficient in writing code that conforms to this standard. Do you agree that this is a growing need and would this enhance my marketability?

    4) I'm on a budget.  My plan is to leverage Microsoft Virtual Academy to learn and study for the exams for certification as an MCSD. Any other advice to that end?

    Thanks!!

    Saturday, December 27, 2014 5:57 PM

Answers

  • Responding to your question number 3: No, it is not worthwile studying the AES standard, except as a curiosity if you are interested in cryptographic algorithms. In practice, when you write a program, you are NEVER going to be coding yourself the cryptographic algorithm. Instead, you will use one of the library functions that internally implement the required algorithm. These libraries have already been well-tested and debugged, and are included with the Framework. You just call them to get your data encrypted, without worrying about the details about how the encryption algorithm is actually implemented.

    If you wish to get certified on the development of secure applications, take a look at the EC-Council Certified Secure Programmer (ESCP) .NET: http://www.eccouncil.org/Certification/ec-council-certified-secure-programmer-dotnet

    Sunday, December 28, 2014 8:40 AM

All replies

  • Responding to your question number 3: No, it is not worthwile studying the AES standard, except as a curiosity if you are interested in cryptographic algorithms. In practice, when you write a program, you are NEVER going to be coding yourself the cryptographic algorithm. Instead, you will use one of the library functions that internally implement the required algorithm. These libraries have already been well-tested and debugged, and are included with the Framework. You just call them to get your data encrypted, without worrying about the details about how the encryption algorithm is actually implemented.

    If you wish to get certified on the development of secure applications, take a look at the EC-Council Certified Secure Programmer (ESCP) .NET: http://www.eccouncil.org/Certification/ec-council-certified-secure-programmer-dotnet

    Sunday, December 28, 2014 8:40 AM
  • That is good info, I'll check out the link to ESCP.  Thanks for the info, Alberto.
    Sunday, December 28, 2014 11:03 PM