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Should I begin with an MTA, win server 2008 or jump into 2012? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am at the point of choosing a path to follow and build a career in i.t, which the only work experience I have is using word, onenote and outlook 2010 and have used powerpoint, excel and publisher in the past. I have been using windows desktop since 3.11 and along the way self taught to troubleshoot most issues in the subsequent environments.

    I have looked mainly at windows server as my goal, as I'm not great with learning code to become a dev and I can use my OS experience and not interested in design.

    So, I'm hoping someone who is an i.t or H.R manager can give me some tips.

    I am considering the MTA windows server 98-365 which is a 6 month course through computeach as a starting point. I am also wondering is it too basic for me and go straight into server 2012 overview then MCSA.

    Thankyou in advance.

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 1:48 PM

Answers

  • Hi

    If you learn new things easily then the MCSA: Server 2012 would be a good start.

    The 3 exams for MCSA have self-paced study books from MS-Press and there are also instructor video recording from CBT Nuggets or Trainsignal.


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    MCSE:Server Infrastructure, MCSE:Desktop Infrastructure, MCSA Server 2012, Citrix CCIA & CCEE, Cisco CCNA, VMware VCP 3/4/5 Twitter: @dnyvandam http://www.dannyvandam.net


    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 4:56 PM
    Moderator
  • Know that there are multiple paths to get where you want.  Each is a bit different.  In my opinion, your best bet is going the following order.

    1. Learn hardware.  Things such as building a computer from the ground up, swapping out components, and troubleshooting hardware problems.  It sounds like you may have some of this (maybe all of it) already.  Obtain your CompTIA A+ certification.
    2. Work at a job doing client support or desktop support.  There are two main reasons to do this.  The first is that it will be tough to get a job working with servers when you don't have any work experience.  The second is that when you are working on servers (or infrastructure related stuff), it has a direct impact on employees and computing devices (desktop/laptops/tablet/smartphone)... so having experience supporting those will likely make you a much better server guy later.
    3. Study, train, and get certified on Windows Server and related (such as Microsoft System Center 2012).  Build a Windows Server 2012 server at home, add Hyper-V, and then build a bunch of virtual machines running Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, and Windows 8.  Use the home server for your studying, training, and certifications.
    4. Apply for jobs that involve servers.  You may have to start out in smaller shops doing what some call a jack-of-all-trades job (where you take care of all computing devices and anything else that non-technical people think is a computer).  But this will get you exposed to servers and infrastructure.  Work for a year or two and continue to study, train, and get certified.
    5. Apply for a dedicated server job -systems engineer, server admin, etc.  You now have the skills and experience.
    6. Continue to increase skills, experience.  Make more money, take on interesting projects.
    7. Retire after a long, long time!  Should be fun along the way!

    Looping back to your question about MTA (98-365) or straight into Windows Server 2012 (MCSA).  Pros and cons to both. 98-365 will cover more stuff that is in use today. Allow you to hit the ground running in jobs right now. Windows Server 2012 is still fairly new and many organizations haven't moved to it yet (although it is rock solid and virtually all organizations will eventually move to it).  So your Windows Server 2012 skills will differentiate you (not as many people will have those skills).  But, Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2 skills are going to be important for years to come.  Lots of projects for upgrading, updating, migrating, etc.

    Hope that helps!  Remember, multiple paths will take you where you want to go.  This is just one of those.

    Brian

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 9:33 PM

All replies

  • Hi

    If you learn new things easily then the MCSA: Server 2012 would be a good start.

    The 3 exams for MCSA have self-paced study books from MS-Press and there are also instructor video recording from CBT Nuggets or Trainsignal.


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    MCSE:Server Infrastructure, MCSE:Desktop Infrastructure, MCSA Server 2012, Citrix CCIA & CCEE, Cisco CCNA, VMware VCP 3/4/5 Twitter: @dnyvandam http://www.dannyvandam.net


    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 4:56 PM
    Moderator
  • Know that there are multiple paths to get where you want.  Each is a bit different.  In my opinion, your best bet is going the following order.

    1. Learn hardware.  Things such as building a computer from the ground up, swapping out components, and troubleshooting hardware problems.  It sounds like you may have some of this (maybe all of it) already.  Obtain your CompTIA A+ certification.
    2. Work at a job doing client support or desktop support.  There are two main reasons to do this.  The first is that it will be tough to get a job working with servers when you don't have any work experience.  The second is that when you are working on servers (or infrastructure related stuff), it has a direct impact on employees and computing devices (desktop/laptops/tablet/smartphone)... so having experience supporting those will likely make you a much better server guy later.
    3. Study, train, and get certified on Windows Server and related (such as Microsoft System Center 2012).  Build a Windows Server 2012 server at home, add Hyper-V, and then build a bunch of virtual machines running Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, and Windows 8.  Use the home server for your studying, training, and certifications.
    4. Apply for jobs that involve servers.  You may have to start out in smaller shops doing what some call a jack-of-all-trades job (where you take care of all computing devices and anything else that non-technical people think is a computer).  But this will get you exposed to servers and infrastructure.  Work for a year or two and continue to study, train, and get certified.
    5. Apply for a dedicated server job -systems engineer, server admin, etc.  You now have the skills and experience.
    6. Continue to increase skills, experience.  Make more money, take on interesting projects.
    7. Retire after a long, long time!  Should be fun along the way!

    Looping back to your question about MTA (98-365) or straight into Windows Server 2012 (MCSA).  Pros and cons to both. 98-365 will cover more stuff that is in use today. Allow you to hit the ground running in jobs right now. Windows Server 2012 is still fairly new and many organizations haven't moved to it yet (although it is rock solid and virtually all organizations will eventually move to it).  So your Windows Server 2012 skills will differentiate you (not as many people will have those skills).  But, Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2 skills are going to be important for years to come.  Lots of projects for upgrading, updating, migrating, etc.

    Hope that helps!  Remember, multiple paths will take you where you want to go.  This is just one of those.

    Brian

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 9:33 PM