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Wireless Clients RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have WHS connected to my router through wired connection. I then have a desktop and a laptop both wirelessly connected to the router, as well as an Xbox 360 wireless connected as well.

     

    I'm new to WHS and am thinking about transfering all my files to the user files on the server, so that they duplicate across the board from whichever computer I log on to. As I'm getting tired of leaving files on one pc and having totally different ones on another. They are in pretty close range of each other (15-20ft) but connecting them all with a wire would be too much hassle as they're all around my living room.

     

    I've started to copy files but cancelled as its terribly slow, if I was to connect my clients to the router with a wired connection and transfer the files then, and then went back to wireless once they'd been transfered, would the files still be extremely slow to access etc? if so, how do I improve that while still maintaining wireless connectivity for my clients?

     

    Thanks in advance.

    Thursday, August 21, 2008 9:10 AM

Answers

  • Wireless networking is slower than wired networking. There's no way around that. You don't say what kind of wireless network you have, but if we assume 802.11g, your maximum theoretical throughput is only 54 Mbps, about 5% of the theoretical throughput of gigabit Ethernet. And you won't see anywhere near a full 54 Mbps on a typical wireless network. Wireless N is faster, but you probably won't see enough of an improvement to make it a worthwhile investment (and some systems won't be able to upgrade anyway, such as your Xbox).

    The best way to improve performance when transferring files is to use a wired connection. Once your files are on your server, your wireless network may prove fast enough to work with them from there. If not, again you will need to go to a wired connection for those systems that need frequent access to your files.
    Thursday, August 21, 2008 11:40 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    you did not give any specification of your wireless connection (which hardware and standards, walls between?).

    So the question is, what means "terrible slow"?

     

    Download the latest drivers for your WLAN adapters and install the latest firmware on your router, if not yet done. Try to adjust the antenna on the router or replace it against a more powerfull.

    You also should be aware, that WLAN is very sensitive to environmental influences, i.e. wireless devices in your neighbourhood, certain electrical devices and phones, metall in walls etc.

     

    Best greetings from Germany

    Olaf
    Thursday, August 21, 2008 11:36 AM
    Moderator
  • Wireless networking is slower than wired networking. There's no way around that. You don't say what kind of wireless network you have, but if we assume 802.11g, your maximum theoretical throughput is only 54 Mbps, about 5% of the theoretical throughput of gigabit Ethernet. And you won't see anywhere near a full 54 Mbps on a typical wireless network. Wireless N is faster, but you probably won't see enough of an improvement to make it a worthwhile investment (and some systems won't be able to upgrade anyway, such as your Xbox).

    The best way to improve performance when transferring files is to use a wired connection. Once your files are on your server, your wireless network may prove fast enough to work with them from there. If not, again you will need to go to a wired connection for those systems that need frequent access to your files.
    Thursday, August 21, 2008 11:40 AM
    Moderator
  • Oh yeah sorry, it is 802.11g (though my router is capable of b) and my WLAN adapters have capabilities of 54mbps.

     

    My router is currently a Netgear D834GT router. Which ones would you recommend for maximum transfer capability?

     

    Cheers guys

     

    Thursday, August 21, 2008 11:51 AM
  • Currently WLAN access routers fullfilling the Draft N standard (together with the proper adapters) would best fit the need for high transfer rates (if you are stuck with WLAN instead of wire).

    Cannot recommend any, since you are in another area, where different models may dominate the market.

    Best greetings from Germany

    Olaf

    Thursday, August 21, 2008 12:00 PM
    Moderator
  • Seriously, I can't recommend anything short of draft N if you need to transport large files on a regular basis. And even that is pushing things. In theory, draft N is as fast as "fast Ethernet" (100BaseT). In reality, wireless overhead cuts that down significantly, and in any case anything short of gigabit ethernet is, umm, suboptimal if you're thinking about streaming HD content at some point. (IIRC H.264 at 720p is around 15 MBps = 150 Mbps.)

    I'm not terribly willing to recommend specific hardware (look around the forums and you'll see my reluctance all over; I do a great sidestep when that sort of question comes up Smile) but in general I like Netgear and D-Link routers (except the D-Link DIR-655, which many people seem to have had trouble with) more than Linksys. I used to like Cisco a whole lot, but I haven't been very happy with recent products and support. At home I use a SonicWall TZ-170 (which is apparently due for replacement as it recently developed a dead ethernet port) and a Linksys WAP54G (it will fail someday, but it's been bulletproof for years even though I don't generally like Linksys) for wireless.
    Thursday, August 21, 2008 3:48 PM
    Moderator
  • I have also all my family PCs wired (built the house with Gigabit Ethernet in the walls). There is sitting a FRITZ!Box 7270 as router, and a Linksys SRW224G4 managed switch behind.

    WLAN is available as well through the FRITZ!Box, but I will use it only for my laptop sometimes for convenience.

    So I agree, if it can be avoided, circumvent WLAN for the normal use with larger data transfers involved.

    Best greetings from Gemany

    Olaf

    Thursday, August 21, 2008 5:40 PM
    Moderator
  • What if I used FTP to transfer the files instead of just copying and moving them via Windows Explorer? Would it make it any faster? See, I'm not too bothered about the transfer rate as I can plug my computers into the router while they transfer, but afterwards I won't be able to use a wire because it's a lot of hassle it being sprawled over my living room. If the files can be accessed, read and edited lightly with not much slowness then I'm not too bothered.

     

    I installed WHS simply because I wanted to access the same files on my laptop and computer fast and efficiently. And if I can't do that on WHS because of the slow connectivity, then what other solutions would you suggest?

     

    Thanks in advance Smile

    Friday, August 22, 2008 9:08 AM
  • I am regularly experiencing issues with wireless clients, especially when transferring big chunks of data. Not to be forgotten, that the data is transferred from your client to the router and from the router to the WHS including all the bi-directional handshaking. Even worse if your desktop and laptop are simultaneously accessing the WHS.

     

    In my home set-up, I have organised, that only laptops can access the wireless router. Other connections should be wired (ethernet), and where possible the amount of channels on the router should be explored.

     

    I have the same issue with wiring hassle, but recently found and installed a great alternative: powerline networking. Price for an adapter is becoming acceptable: I bought 4 adapters for 40 Euro each (~60 USD), the so-called 200Mbps versions. I am getting an actual throughput of 50-60 Mbps.

    Friday, August 22, 2008 10:55 AM
  • BenQuo, to see a significant improvement over your current wireless speeds, you will need to use a wired connection. If the files you're working with are very large (hundreds of MB, GB) they may also be slow to open when you want to edit them. If they're relatively small, they'll still be slower than they would be on a wired connection, but you probably won't notice.
    Friday, August 22, 2008 11:52 AM
    Moderator