locked
Are dual NICs useless RRS feed

  • Question

  • I see a few threads suggesting the use of two nics and then today I found a thread on Nics and it talked about subnets and the fact that WHS will only use 1 Nic effectively.

     

    Can someone from the WHS team clarify.

     

    I am on a 100Mbit network right now even though I have a gigabit onboard NIC. So I thought I could atleast double my bandwidth by adding another Gigabit Nic I had laying around for a potential 200Mb of bandwith.

     

    And if it is capable of using two or more do I bridge them or leave them alone and let the O.S. manage whatever needs to be done?

     

    BTW I do love WHS. I saw somewhere that the install is good for 180 days. Will the final version be out by then?

    Friday, July 13, 2007 6:32 PM

All replies

  •  PAPutzback247814 wrote:

    I see a few threads suggesting the use of two nics and then today I found a thread on Nics and it talked about subnets and the fact that WHS will only use 1 Nic effectively.

    Can someone from the WHS team clarify.

    I am on a 100Mbit network right now even though I have a gigabit onboard NIC. So I thought I could atleast double my bandwidth by adding another Gigabit Nic I had laying around for a potential 200Mb of bandwith.

    And if it is capable of using two or more do I bridge them or leave them alone and let the O.S. manage whatever needs to be done?

    BTW I do love WHS. I saw somewhere that the install is good for 180 days. Will the final version be out by then?



    You can only bond together SOME expensive server NICs and even then, you'd need a special switch that can bond the ports on the other side to do what you're thinking, speed wise. The more common use of multiple NICs is to multi-home a machine, which is to say, have a machine on 2 (or more) networks.

    EDIT:
    You can use 2 NICs on the same subnet to serve two connections, at once, but you can't easily double your bandwidth for a single thread.

    Friday, July 13, 2007 7:05 PM
  • Mybee your Harddrives are the bottelnecks... if they cant deliver more data then your actualy using by one GB-NIC then the second one would be useless... -just a thought...
    Sunday, July 15, 2007 8:23 AM
  •  Novocain wrote:
    Mybee your Harddrives are the bottelnecks... if they cant deliver more data then your actualy using by one GB-NIC then the second one would be useless... -just a thought...

    Actually, he said he's using 100mbit network, he'd be better off buying a gbit switch and getting more speed that way. He never even mentioned his drives so I wouldn't worry about that yet. Wink

    Sunday, July 15, 2007 8:33 AM
  • A few questions.

    Does the router have to be gigabit or just the switch?

    Is Dlink hardware decent enough for this? I've heard the term jumbo packets before when talking about video on the network and I don't know if home grade equipment has this tech.

     

    Is Cat6 a noticeable or needed improvement over cat5e when running a gigabit network?

     

    Here is a home grade switch from DLink

    DGS-2208: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833127082&Tpk=DGS-2208

     

    Or If I need a gigabit router I see this at DLink.

    http://games.dlink.com/products/?pid=371&#DGL-4100

     

    Thanks.

     

    Monday, July 16, 2007 2:29 PM
  • You only need a switch but the "gaming router" has one built in. I personally don't like dlink  or linksys products but Netgear makes an inexpensive gbit switch too.

    Cat6 has better shielding but 5e should work for your home network.

    Hope that helps...


    Monday, July 16, 2007 5:44 PM
  • I have dual intel nics in mine and you can configure them for load balancing as well, for failover support. i've not been able to get teaming to work right at all on WHS.
    Monday, July 16, 2007 6:55 PM
  •  WeezulDK wrote:
    I have dual intel nics in mine and you can configure them for load balancing as well, for failover support. i've not been able to get teaming to work right at all on WHS.


    I've been told that multi-homing is not supported on WHS. YMMV.
    Monday, July 16, 2007 7:22 PM
  • Teaming is not the same thing as multi homing.

     

    When you team Intel server nics you get a "virtual" nic created that handles the "team" of multiple nics "grouped" together to appear to be one nic to the OS. You can have 10/100 and 1gb nics in a team in certain configurations even. But to the network it only provides a single IP at first, you can add IP's manually later by setting it up as statically assigned. So to the OS, you're dealing with ONE IP at the beginning unless you take that team off of being DHCP, hence, you're not multihoming (which means the system is dealing with multiple ip's across multiple nics.

     

    Where I used to work we used teaming for load balancing and failover at a web server and it provided nice throughput and stability.  To anything outside that box, it saw one IP and dealt with it accordingly.

     

    Of course you have to install the Intel drivers for the nics which provides the teaming functionality. It works fine under 2003, and breaks under WHS for some reason, even though at it's heart it's essentially 2003 server.

    Tuesday, July 17, 2007 8:46 PM
  •  WeezulDK wrote:

    Teaming is not the same thing as multi homing.

    When you team Intel server nics you get a "virtual" nic created that handles the "team" of multiple nics "grouped" together to appear to be one nic to the OS. You can have 10/100 and 1gb nics in a team in certain configurations even. But to the network it only provides a single IP at first, you can add IP's manually later by setting it up as statically assigned. So to the OS, you're dealing with ONE IP at the beginning unless you take that team off of being DHCP, hence, you're not multihoming (which means the system is dealing with multiple ip's across multiple nics.

    Where I used to work we used teaming for load balancing and failover at a web server and it provided nice throughput and stability. To anything outside that box, it saw one IP and dealt with it accordingly.

    Of course you have to install the Intel drivers for the nics which provides the teaming functionality. It works fine under 2003, and breaks under WHS for some reason, even though at it's heart it's essentially 2003 server.


    If multi-homing isn't supported, do you really think teaming would be? I know what it is and how it works. My point was, it's not supported.

    Hope that helps...

    Tuesday, July 17, 2007 8:51 PM
  • @WeezulDK - that was interesting, thanks
    Tuesday, July 17, 2007 9:33 PM