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Can i run 2 servers using 2 copies of windows home server on the same network RRS feed

  • Question

  • Can i run 2 servers using 2 copies of windows home server on the same network and how can i do it
    right now i can only access one server at a time with home server console and to access the other server i have to reinstall the home server console and during the install pick which server i want.
    thanks for any help you can provide.
    Sunday, January 24, 2010 7:29 PM

Answers

  • Yes, but you will only be able to configure one server for remote access, and a given client computer can only be joined to a single server at a time. To switch a client from one server to the other, you don't have to uninstall/reinstall the client software; instead you can run C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server\discovery.exe on the client.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Proposed as answer by kariya21Moderator Monday, January 25, 2010 1:38 AM
    • Marked as answer by KelCam Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:37 AM
    Sunday, January 24, 2010 7:43 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks alot Ken, that was alot of help. I was just wandering if that is the only way to do it. 
    • Marked as answer by KelCam Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:37 AM
    Sunday, January 24, 2010 8:30 PM
  • I was wondering whether a direct Remote Desktop Connection to each of the servers IP's would give you the control/access you need from a single computer?

    • Marked as answer by KelCam Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:37 AM
    Monday, January 25, 2010 1:06 PM
  • Remote Desktop from a single computer works with my two Windows Home Servers.  The downside is you need to install add-ins from a client, which does not work with Remote Desktop.

    One option: With a client running Windows 7 that supports XP mode, you can create a virtual client to a different WHS.  That's how I got my add-ins loaded.  My computer runs very slow in XP mode, so I use Remote Desktop to access the second WHS which only exists to back-up the main WHS.
    • Marked as answer by KelCam Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:41 AM
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:31 AM

All replies

  • Yes, but you will only be able to configure one server for remote access, and a given client computer can only be joined to a single server at a time. To switch a client from one server to the other, you don't have to uninstall/reinstall the client software; instead you can run C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server\discovery.exe on the client.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Proposed as answer by kariya21Moderator Monday, January 25, 2010 1:38 AM
    • Marked as answer by KelCam Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:37 AM
    Sunday, January 24, 2010 7:43 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks alot Ken, that was alot of help. I was just wandering if that is the only way to do it. 
    • Marked as answer by KelCam Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:37 AM
    Sunday, January 24, 2010 8:30 PM
  • I was wondering whether a direct Remote Desktop Connection to each of the servers IP's would give you the control/access you need from a single computer?

    • Marked as answer by KelCam Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:37 AM
    Monday, January 25, 2010 1:06 PM
  • Remote Desktop from a single computer works with my two Windows Home Servers.  The downside is you need to install add-ins from a client, which does not work with Remote Desktop.

    One option: With a client running Windows 7 that supports XP mode, you can create a virtual client to a different WHS.  That's how I got my add-ins loaded.  My computer runs very slow in XP mode, so I use Remote Desktop to access the second WHS which only exists to back-up the main WHS.
    • Marked as answer by KelCam Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:41 AM
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 12:31 AM
  • Yes, but you will only be able to configure one server for remote access, and a given client computer can only be joined to a single server at a time. To switch a client from one server to the other, you don't have to uninstall/reinstall the client software; instead you can run C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server\discovery.exe on the client.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    That's not always the case though is it Ken?

    My router to the outside world can port forward to any internal IP based on a trigger port, which is not necessarily the same as the forwarded port.  So I could access say https://mydomain.homeserver.com:80  and  https://mydomain.homeserver.com:8001 and have each route to the relevant Home Server accordingly on port 80.  The latter one being a "triggered" port.

       

     

    Then the relevant rule gets assigned to the network device (Server IP).

    Unless I've misunderstood the purpose and implementation of trigger ports!

    • Proposed as answer by Al West Tuesday, January 26, 2010 10:29 AM
    • Edited by BobC_01 Sunday, January 31, 2010 10:03 PM
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 9:42 AM
  • I have two Windows Home Servers and I can install Add-Ins using remote desktop on both - so your downside seems to be something strange in your setup. 
    --
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 10:29 AM
  • If you want to employ advanced networking techniques, sure, you can configure your own network as you like, though a more robust solution by far than "port triggering" is to buy a business class of service with multiple static IP addresses and a good business class router.

    In the general case, however, the answer is no, because A) most consumer routers don't offer the configuration required, and B) most people using Windows Home Server won't have a clear understanding of how to configure their routers to achieve this, even with their router manual sitting in front of them.

    You will also run into problems trying to configure Remote Access if you're using port triggering, because both servers will want to configure a custom domain name, and because certain functionality (remote desktop to client computers) is tied to a single port which can't be changed.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 3:42 PM
    Moderator
  • If you want to employ advanced networking techniques, sure, you can configure your own network as you like, though a more robust solution by far than "port triggering" is to buy a business class of service with multiple static IP addresses and a good business class router.

    But as you say Ken, most "Home Server" implementers are probably of a skill and knowledge level that would naturally exclude them from implementing a business class of service, let alone pay for one!
    In the general case, however, the answer is no, because A) most consumer routers don't offer the configuration required, and B) most people using Windows Home Server won't have a clear understanding of how to configure their routers to achieve this, even with their router manual sitting in front of them.

    True, but perhaps I was lucky with my router from my ISP.  Also I would not consider a Home Server user who wants to implement two servers and apparently confident of Remote Desktop, someone who is likely to baulk at network configurations. So a router/network re-jig is a reasonable suggestion.  Besides, if you think most Home Server users are not that proficient, I would have been very wary about posting instructions on how to cajole WHS to set up its own System Restore capabilities! Far more involved and potentially dangerous than run-of-the-mill router/network settings!  I consider myself reasonably proficient in screwing up my PC, but even so, I will steer clear of implementing System Restore capabilities on my beloved WHS!
    You will also run into problems trying to configure Remote Access if you're using port triggering, because both servers will want to configure a custom domain name, and because certain functionality (remote desktop to client computers) is tied to a single port which can't be changed.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    To test a set up, I had been running WHS in a VM and on a separate server on the same network at the same time. The fact that they both used the same MS Live account to get the domain name was not an issue IIRC. They both "registered" as mydomain.homeserver.com without issue. As I didn't need simultaneous remote access I just manually configured my router to forward the traffic to the WHS I wanted to use at that time. It overrode the PnP config each server "wrote" to the router.  But port triggering and forwarding could have been used to good effect I think.

    Just as an aside, couldn't a remote web session to one WHS web interface also do an "internal" Remote Desktop session to the the other WHS? I seem to remember when connected to my WHS externally I could pass through to a remote desktop via the (IE) browser to my main desktop PC. No reason why this couldn't be the other WHS IMO.
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 11:31 PM
  • Hmm. I've made suggestions, you've made suggestions. I know mine will work; they're pretty standard and I've configured multiple servers using multiple IP addresses on my own network. I'm not so sure about yours, to be honest; I think you need to test your theories. And the average user of Windows Home Server can't figure out how to do a backup of their home computers using the software built into Windows, so I feel pretty comfortable saying the average user has a fairly low level of technical ability.

    Mostly, though, I think we aren't helping the OP at this point, so let's move on.

    Oh, yes, regarding system restore: I don't believe I've ever recommended someone try to implement system restore on Windows Home Server. Doing so requires reverse engineering both Windows XP and Windows Home Server (illegal) and definitely will leave your server in an unsupported state at the end of the process.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, January 27, 2010 4:10 AM
    Moderator
  • Ken Warren: You're an idiotic and stubborn person for your obstinance and antiquated ways and your refusal to recognize that someone else may just have the answers you have failed to provide. Your assessment of the avg home user is dead wrong and arrogant....I guess MVP stands for Most Vacuous Person...
    Sunday, January 31, 2010 6:13 PM
  • Ken Warren: You're an idiotic and stubborn person for your obstinance and antiquated ways and your refusal to recognize that someone else may just have the answers you have failed to provide. Your assessment of the avg home user is dead wrong and arrogant....I guess MVP stands for Most Vacuous Person...
    A) Reported for abuse.

    B) Ken is (and always has been) more than willing to listen to other points of view/alternate methods of fixing problems. However, his view of the average user is dead on.  You go to any true average person (i.e. 10 co-workers or family members that don't work in any form of IT department - either currently or previously - and who know nothing more about computers than how to use whatever programs they were trained to use for work and/or how to surf the internet) and you ask them "How do you backup your PC at home?".  I'll bet at least a few of them will say something like "I don't backup.  Why should I?" or "What's a backup and how do I do it?"
    Sunday, January 31, 2010 8:35 PM
    Moderator
  • Hmm. I've made suggestions, you've made suggestions. I know mine will work; they're pretty standard and I've configured multiple servers using multiple IP addresses on my own network. I'm not so sure about yours, to be honest; I think you need to test your theories . And the average user of Windows Home Server can't figure out how to do a backup of their home computers using the software built into Windows, so I feel pretty comfortable saying the average user has a fairly low level of technical ability.

    Mostly, though, I think we aren't helping the OP at this point, so let's move on.

    Oh, yes, regarding system restore: I don't believe I've ever recommended someone try to implement system restore on Windows Home Server. Doing so requires reverse engineering both Windows XP and Windows Home Server (illegal) and definitely will leave your server in an unsupported state at the end of the process.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    Well, my theories were more wrong than right!  Where the theory fell down for me is that the servers turn off overnight and depending on which of the two servers boots first, depends what gets routed to what because even though the router has rules, it appears on my router at least that the UPnP from the WHS will take precedent.  For me the way to manage two servers remotely is to use the "normal" WHS web pages and to remotely connect to the first WHS using the first option, then connect to a desktop which is backed up that server and use Remote desktop to access the 2nd WHS.  In either instance, I could not get both WHS servers to simultaneously expose their shared folders through the router. So I suppose the answer to the original question is both yes and no, depending on what you want to achieve!

     

    Sunday, January 31, 2010 9:55 PM
  • sorry to interupt,

    but can anyone tell me why i don't have a

    REMOTE ACCESS TO WINDOWS HOME SERVER

    link on my remote screen?

    Sunday, April 18, 2010 10:03 PM
  • You also don't have a Computers tab, I would wager. The remote connection functionality uses an ActiveX control, which will only work in Internet Explorer, so you should use Internet Explorer instead of Firefox, Chrome, etc. Or use the IE Tab add-in for Firefox, which hosts Internet Explorer inside Firefox.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, April 19, 2010 2:32 AM
    Moderator