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Moving my validated copy of windows XP to my new PC RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have just purchased a new copy of Windows XP professional from Microsoft which has been validated on my existing PC. This PC has developed a motherboard fault and I am therefore in the process of purchasing a new PC and will need to load my new copy of Windows XP on to it .What problems will I have with the re validation and how do I go about it.
    Friday, January 5, 2007 2:09 PM

Answers

  • Justcurious,

    Retail copies of XP come in a pretty retail box that has the Certificate of Authenticity (COA) affixed to the boxtop.  For this reason, retail COAs do not have the Prodcut Key printed on them.  Inside the pretty box is an equally pretty folder that has a black sponge thingie that secures the CD.  Affixed to the back of this folder is a yellow-orange label with the Product Key.

    Here is what I would do given your circumstances:

    1.  Temporarily disconnect the old disk from data and power cables.

    2.  Rejumper (if you are not using cable select) and recable the new disk to be the master disk on the primary IDE channel.

    3.  Regardless of what you have done so far, do a clean installation of XP onto the new disk.  (This will clear up potentially nasty drive letter issues since XP likes to be installed on the C: drive, not the D: or other drive that the new installation is now on.)  Do NOT activate just yet.  You have a 30-day grace period.

    4.  Since you are not yet activated, you cannot download Windows Updates yet, but you can install programs that you will need in the interim while you are fine-tuning the new installation.  Install whatever security and productivity programs you need set up email accounts, etc.

    5.  Shut down, reconnect the old disk, but set it up as the slave on the Primary IDE channel, and restart.  As of this point, with default motherboard settings, it will not be a boot selection.  If you have a requirement to run the old XP installation, manually edit the new installation's boot.ini file to add the old XP onto the boot menu, or use the Recovery Console's BOOTCFG command to add it. This KB aticle tells you how to start the computer into the RC and how to use the BOOTCFG command http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314058/en-us  Once you are done with the old XP installation you can easily remove the line that adds it to the boot menu and then the boot menu will no longer appear.

    6.  Now the computer is running from the new XP and has access to the old disk as a slave drive.  Leaving the old XP and programs alone for now, you copy your data, email, pix, etc. from the old disk to the new.

    7.  Once you are sure that you will not have a need to start and run the old XP, simply use the activation wizard to do an online activation of the new XP installation.  There is no specific step to deactivate the old before you activate the new---the process of activating the new automatically deactivates the old.

    8.  Once activated, you can go to Windows Updates and get about a million updates.

    9.  Finally when you are sure there is nothing on the old disk you need, use Disk Managment to repartition and reformat it as desired.  If it's not a reliable disk as you said, it would be best to trash it.  If the disk had important personal info on it, you may want to consider formatting it several times or using a program to "wipe" it.

    Tuesday, February 6, 2007 3:25 PM
  •  

    Bryce,

     

    Thank you for visiting the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Forum.  The purpose of this forum is the support of Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program.  Your question is off topic as well as outside my area of knowledge. I suggest posting your question to one of the Office newsgroups here:

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/newsgroups/reader.mspx 

     

     

    Thank you,

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    Monday, August 6, 2007 9:00 PM

All replies

  • Michael,

    Is your copy of XP:

    1.  A retail copy?

    2.  A systembuilder/OEM copy?  (The Certificate of Authenticity will have "OEM Product" or "OEM Software" printed in black lettering.)

    3.  A major manufacturer OEM copy?  (The Certificate of Authenticity will have the computer manufacturer's name printed on it.)

    Do you have:

    1.  A Microsoft Hologram CD?

    2.  Or a CD with the manufacturer's name printed on it?

    3.  Or did you get a Recovery Partition and no actual CD?

    Friday, January 5, 2007 2:57 PM
  • Dan,
    the original poster seems to have lost interest in this, but I've gained it. I have a simular problem. My old hard drive (120g Maxtor little older, little slower) seems as if it's on it's way out, I got a newer one (PATA 300g little newer, little faster) which I want to do a clean install of XP Pro on. Installed Pro without a problem, but it wants an activation key. I could use another program like Ghost to just copy my current install of XP over, but it's so clogged up with extraneous junk and such that I'd rather just start anew. Trick is, the activation key is registered to the original install, so, not wanting to be without a computer till I get all my stuff in order, I now have 2 copies of XP on my computer (newer drive set as slave with copy that prompts for activation key, older drive set as master "old copy") and the weird thing is that it wants to load the newer one on the slave drive as the first option. When I have to reboot, I have to manually select the second option to get my working copy of XP running.

    I have a retail disk (complete with hologram on disk and the silly orange and blue "folder" thing it came in) with an XP Key that cost me the full $200 a couple of years ago, but I can't change over untill I can figure out how to "unactivate" my original copy. Is "unactivateing" even an option? On a side note, as I recall, I did strip out the original version and slipstream in an SP2 version (I hate waiting for the updates, which seem to take forever) and that is the version that I installed. It doesn't seem likely that it would make any difference, but I thought I'd add that anyway.

    Please let me know what I can do, or if I need to add additional info.
    Thanks!
    ~J
    Tuesday, February 6, 2007 4:19 AM
  • Justcurious,

    Retail copies of XP come in a pretty retail box that has the Certificate of Authenticity (COA) affixed to the boxtop.  For this reason, retail COAs do not have the Prodcut Key printed on them.  Inside the pretty box is an equally pretty folder that has a black sponge thingie that secures the CD.  Affixed to the back of this folder is a yellow-orange label with the Product Key.

    Here is what I would do given your circumstances:

    1.  Temporarily disconnect the old disk from data and power cables.

    2.  Rejumper (if you are not using cable select) and recable the new disk to be the master disk on the primary IDE channel.

    3.  Regardless of what you have done so far, do a clean installation of XP onto the new disk.  (This will clear up potentially nasty drive letter issues since XP likes to be installed on the C: drive, not the D: or other drive that the new installation is now on.)  Do NOT activate just yet.  You have a 30-day grace period.

    4.  Since you are not yet activated, you cannot download Windows Updates yet, but you can install programs that you will need in the interim while you are fine-tuning the new installation.  Install whatever security and productivity programs you need set up email accounts, etc.

    5.  Shut down, reconnect the old disk, but set it up as the slave on the Primary IDE channel, and restart.  As of this point, with default motherboard settings, it will not be a boot selection.  If you have a requirement to run the old XP installation, manually edit the new installation's boot.ini file to add the old XP onto the boot menu, or use the Recovery Console's BOOTCFG command to add it. This KB aticle tells you how to start the computer into the RC and how to use the BOOTCFG command http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314058/en-us  Once you are done with the old XP installation you can easily remove the line that adds it to the boot menu and then the boot menu will no longer appear.

    6.  Now the computer is running from the new XP and has access to the old disk as a slave drive.  Leaving the old XP and programs alone for now, you copy your data, email, pix, etc. from the old disk to the new.

    7.  Once you are sure that you will not have a need to start and run the old XP, simply use the activation wizard to do an online activation of the new XP installation.  There is no specific step to deactivate the old before you activate the new---the process of activating the new automatically deactivates the old.

    8.  Once activated, you can go to Windows Updates and get about a million updates.

    9.  Finally when you are sure there is nothing on the old disk you need, use Disk Managment to repartition and reformat it as desired.  If it's not a reliable disk as you said, it would be best to trash it.  If the disk had important personal info on it, you may want to consider formatting it several times or using a program to "wipe" it.

    Tuesday, February 6, 2007 3:25 PM
  • hey I am prolly posting this in the wrong area, if I am could you redirect me.

    I have a Dell Inspiron 1520 with Windows Vista Basic on it. Vista is already activated. I want to Install windows xp pro on the laptop, but I want to also be able to move back to vista later. Is there a way to un-activate vista basic, so when I re-install it later it will activate properly. this is a oem vista basic, it came pre installed on the laptop from dell. I want to move back to xp simply because of a compatibility issue.

    thanks,
    Monday, August 6, 2007 12:54 AM
  •  

    Bryce,

     

    Thank you for visiting the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Forum.  The purpose of this forum is the support of Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program.  Your question is off topic as well as outside my area of knowledge. I suggest posting your question to one of the Office newsgroups here:

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/newsgroups/reader.mspx 

     

     

    Thank you,

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    Monday, August 6, 2007 9:00 PM