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SteadyState randomly reboots computers RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I have 14 computers running Vista Business 32-bit SP2. SteadyState was installed on a fresh clean install of Vista, with Office 2007 and a few other applications. We used to have AVG antivirus, but thinking that might be the culprit we uninstalled it and now have no AV (I know!).

    SteadyState manages the updates every evening at a given time. I have a Scheduled Task to shut the PC off about 2 hours after the updates.

    We are having an issue with the computers randomly rebooting. I switched off automatically reboot on error on a couple of test PCs as well as WDP to see if anything was being logged in the event logs. Nothing, and no clue as to why this is happening.

    I suspect SteadyState as we have 25 other PCs of the same make and model (Dell Optiplex 745 and 755 small form factor) that do not have SteadyState installed and do not reboot randomly. Dell support said to try switching power supplies, and to test the temperature of the computer but the temp was normal and they still do it. Disabling SteadyState does not help.

    I took a couple of the PCs and re-imaged them, re-installed SteadyState and they still do it. Any suggestions? It's been like this for months and clients are getting tired of losing their work. Some computers will reboot almost every day others, once a week. And sometimes the Scheduled Shutdown task does not run and we come in the morning and 1 or 2 of the computers will still be on. Thanks!

    • Edited by x13x Thursday, May 12, 2011 12:17 AM Lost paragraph breaks
    Thursday, May 12, 2011 12:16 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    Windows SteadyState doesn’t fully compatible with Windows Vista SP2, it may cause unexpected issue.

     

    Furthermore, please try some generally tests to troubleshoot the issue:

    1 Turn off WDP

    2 Set no restrictions to user

    3 Disable schedule updates on Windows SteadyState

     

    Hope that helps.

     

    Regards,

    Leo   Huang

     

     


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by Leo Huang Monday, May 16, 2011 7:02 AM
    Thursday, May 12, 2011 9:44 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    Windows SteadyState doesn’t fully compatible with Windows Vista SP2, it may cause unexpected issue.

     

    Furthermore, please try some generally tests to troubleshoot the issue:

    1 Turn off WDP

    2 Set no restrictions to user

    3 Disable schedule updates on Windows SteadyState

     

    Hope that helps.

     

    Regards,

    Leo   Huang

     

     


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Marked as answer by Leo Huang Monday, May 16, 2011 7:02 AM
    Thursday, May 12, 2011 9:44 AM
  • I know this is an old thread but its still a problem for people like me that have to use Steady State even years after it went off support.

    Your problem sounds identical to ours and a lot of system monitoring determined Adobe's insidious update service was launching and immediately hiding under a svchost process and downloading 500+mb's of updates before forcing a reboot. It explained why our afflicted Vista boxes kept restarting about 15 minutes after start since it took that long to install and download Adobe hotfixes deeply embedded under a common files directory in %programfiles%.

    Adobe's intentional design to launch then fork into a svchost is just slimy itself, but the confirmation of miscreance was the absence of any notification about its download, or background installation  and obviously its unwillingness to even popup a warning that it's rebooting our shit.

    Whether your mysterious SteadyState reboots are for the same Adobe update reason or any other,  it is important to reconfigure Windows Event Logging especially the system and application log to write events to a non protected drive.

    It seems steady state can have issues storing events since some SteadyState protected systems preserves events even if you reboot and select flush changes while other SteadyState systems even the same version might act as expected and flush valuable troubleshooting events written to a protected volume.

    When we examined our systems logs we noticed "User32" traps that unapologetically reported planned reboots via User32 but with details which cannot be understood by the dll and left mysteriously at that right before noninteractive shutdowns. Adobe's inability to properly post events was the cause of the mysterious user32 traps that were only detailed enough to declare a shutdown but claimed an inability to elaborate why.

    Since then, we've been using Procmon to just eKG any steadystate box that doesn't behave as expected since it would've ID'd that Adobe and any other non windows service / application commandeering and rebooting the system.

    Friday, April 5, 2013 8:03 AM